Tag Archive | "Well"

These 4 Copywriting Techniques Work Really Well … Right Up Until They Don’t

Search on Google and you’ll find hundreds of thousands of pages devoted to copywriting secrets, tips, tricks, and techniques. Go…

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How to Find a Juicy Writing Idea When Your Creative Well Has Run Dry

It’s the hard part. The thing about being a writer that isn’t necessarily all that awesome. Sometimes it’s the part that makes you doubt yourself, doubt your creativity and abilities, maybe even doubt whether this whole professional writing thing really makes sense for you. “What the &$ %# am I going to write about this week?”–
Read More…

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Online Marketing News: Less Filling Facebook, Organic Is Live & Well, Mobile Makes Modest Move

Evolution Of Twitter

The Evolution of Twitter – Twitter which was launched way back in 2006 has definitely gone a long way eversince it was created. To date, there are more than 288 million users who are active in sharing and sending tweets in a day. In using Twitter, you can now share and read tweets anytime and anywhere. Check out the full history of Twitter in this infographic. Tech & Science

STUDY: Facebook Pages’ Organic Reach Is Not Quite Dead – The conventional wisdom about Facebook pages is that organic reach is virtually nonexistent and posts with photos perform the best, but a study by social analytics and reporting firm Locowise poked holes in those theories. SocialTimes

Study: Searchers Use Question Formats 27% Of The Time – A new study analyzes how searchers type in queries by looking at the query format and query length. Search Engine Land

Marketing Departments to Move Majority of Apps to Cloud in 2 Years – Forty-seven percent of marketing departments will have 60 percent of their apps on a cloud platform within two years. Almost half of marketing departments will have two-thirds of their applications on a cloud platform in two years, a report from 451 Research has revealed. ClickZ

Facebook Partners With Shopify to Launch Its Own ‘Buy’ Button – It was announced today that Shopify and Facebook are teaming up to launch a ‘Buy’ button that will enable people to buy items found in the news feed without having to leave the world’s top social network. Search Engine Journal

Facebook Announces Facebook Lite – This week, Facebook introduced Facebook Lite, a new version of Facebook for Android that uses less data and works well across all network conditions. Facebook

Content Marketing Now Comprises 40% of LinkedIn’s Ad Revenue – LinkedIn generated revenue of $ 119 million selling ads during the first three months of 2015, a 38% increase over the year-earlier period, the company said Thursday. But the outlook for the second quarter and full year was weaker than expected, and headwinds for display ad sales meant a lot rides on the continued expansion of LinkedIn’s sponsored posts. Ad Age

STUDY: Envy of Friends, Family Can Make Facebook Use Depressing – All of these studies suggesting that Facebook use causes depression, are, well, depressing.The latest comes from University of Houston researcher Mai-Ly Steers, who found after conducting two separate studies that some Facebook users find themselves comparing their lives with the activities and accomplishments of their friends and family on the social network. SocialTimes

Report: YouTube Still Trumps Facebook Video For Brands Over The Long Haul – Visible Measures data shows Facebook with 35% of video views from a sample of March campaigns, but over time the balance shifts in YouTube’s favor. Marketing Land

Report: Mobile Search Queries 29 Percent Of Total But Growth Modest – comScore released its latest “Digital Future in Focus” compilation of key stats for the US market. Most of the material has been previously exposed in one form or another. However for the first time comScore released search volumes for mobile. Search Engine Land

Twitter Improves User Experience with New Block Tools – The platform is going to enable users to block multiple unwanted accounts at the same time and share lists of accounts they have blocked. ClickZ

REPORT: Page Likes Down 3% to 4% After Facebook Cuts Inactive Accounts – Social analytics provider Quintly broke up pages into two groups — those with fewer than and more than 1 million likes — and found that pages in the former group saw their like totals drop by an average of around 3 percent, while that figure was approximately 4 percent for the latter group. SocialTimes

What were the top online and digital marketing news stories for you this week?

Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!

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How to Create Compelling Content that Ranks Well in Search Engines

Image of MyCopyblogger SEO Copywriting Marketing Icon

I don’t think there’s a single topic in online marketing that’s as misunderstood as SEO.

Partly it’s because on the surface, SEO has changed so much. What worked even a few years ago will destroy your rankings today.

Oddly enough, though, the SEO strategy at Copyblogger has stayed remarkably consistent since Brian Clark started the blog in January, 2006.

It’s not because Brian was staying up late at night reading Google algorithm patents.

It’s because he understood something fundamental about the search engines that most people still don’t see.

He understood that for search engines to be happy — they need happy searchers.

Content that creates happy searchers will be content that makes Google look smart for finding it.

Interestingly enough, that same content is always what will build your audience, connect you with potential customers, and show them that your business is the one they want to choose above all others.

Brian’s search strategy raised some eyebrows in the hardcore SEO community at first. But these days, the advice coming out of the world’s best and brightest SEOs looks a lot like … well … like the Copyblogger archives.

But we’re not here to boast. Because it’s so much more interesting to show you how you can do it, too.

And if it’s cool with you, we’d like to do that for free.

SEO copywriting probably isn’t what you think it is

Search engine research shows that almost 85% of the total factors determining how a web page is ranked are based on things that happen off the page itself. But what you do with your site can absolutely influence that 85%, and help tip the balance in your favor.

Simply put, modern SEO is all about crafting content so compelling that other people want to promote it by linking to it or sharing it, which increases your trust and authority and helps the pages you want to rank well for certain keywords.

We’d love to show how to make that happen for your site. Our (free) 27-page ebook on How to Create Compelling Content that Ranks Well in Search Engines will teach you:

  • Why SEO copywriting still matters
  • How to “spoon-feed” the search engines
  • Three link-building strategies that actually work
  • The five areas you need to focus on with SEO copywriting
  • How to make SEO copywriting simple

This ebook is just one in our comprehensive library for online marketers, available instantly when you register for MyCopyblogger.

When you register (at no charge) you’ll get instant access to nearly 100,000 words of proven marketing training in fourteen high-impact ebooks, plus our completely revamped 20-part Internet marketing course.

Take a quick look at what’s waiting for you in MyCopyblogger right now …

  • Copywriting 101: How to Craft Compelling Copy
  • How to Write Magnetic Headlines
  • How to Create Compelling Content that Ranks Well in Search Engines
  • Content Marketing: How to Build an Audience that Builds Your Business
  • The Business Case for Agile Content Marketing
  • A Content Marketing Strategy that Works
  • How to Create Content that Converts
  • How to Effectively Promote Your Content
  • Content Marketing Research: The Crucial First Step
  • How to Build Authority through Content and Google Authorship
  • Email Marketing: How to Push Send and Grow Your Business
  • Keyword Research for Web Writers and Content Producers
  • Landing Pages: How to Turn Traffic into Money

Inside these ebooks you’ll find the very same tactics, strategies, and processes that allowed us to build Copyblogger Media from a simple blog into a content-fueled software and training company with more than 100,000 customers.

More than ever, SEO is now a game that rewards the well-rounded, strategic content marketer. Sign up for MyCopyblogger to find out how to become that marketer, and to take advantage of months of valuable free marketing education.

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About the Author: Sonia Simone is co-founder and CMO of Copyblogger Media. Get more from Sonia on Twitter and .

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How Unique Does Content Need to Be to Perform Well in Search Engines? – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

We all know that content needs to be unique to rank highly in the SERPs, but how "unique" are we talking? From a content creation perspective, it's imperative to know what duplicate content really means and to understand the implications it can have on SEO.

In this week's Whiteboard Friday, Rand discusses what makes content unique in the eyes of the crawlers, and the bane of duplicate content.

Video Transcription

"Howdy SEOmoz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week I want to take some time to talk about content duplication and content uniqueness, which is very important from an SEO perspective. It can also be important from a content marketing perspective.

For SEO purposes, search engines like to filter out what they view as duplicative content, things that are exactly the same. They never want to show you a set of results where result two, three, four, and five are all exactly the same article or are essentially the same three paragraphs repeated with the same photos embedded in them. It could be that content gets licensed among different parties. News vendors do this a lot. It could be that someone has done some plagiarism and actually stolen a piece. It could just be that someone is posting the same article in several different places on the web that accept content submissions. In any case, the engines are trying to filter this type of behavior out. They don't want to see that content because they know users are made happy by, "If I didn't like this result on this website, chances are I'm not going to like it on result number three on the different website." So they try and filter this stuff out.

From an SEO perspective and for content creators, it's therefore very important to understand, "What does that really mean? What is meant by duplicate content, and how unique do I really need to be?"

The first thing that I always like to talk about when we get into a discussion of content uniqueness is that content, when we talk about the content that the engines are considering for this, we're referring only to the unique material on a page. That excludes navigation, ads, footers, sidebars, etc.

I've got a page mockup over here, and you would exclude all this stuff – the logo, the navigation, the sidebars. Maybe this person is running some ads in the sidebar. Maybe they've got a little piece about themselves, and they've got a bunch of text down the right-hand side. Then they think, "Boy, I only have a couple of lines of text on this page and a photo and maybe a couple of bullet points. Is this unique from these other pages that look exactly the same except they have some different content in the content section?" This is the content. If you're worried that, "Oh no, I think that my pages might be kind of heavy and my content is kind of light," I wouldn't worry too much about that so long as you're doing everything else right. We'll talk about some of those. Number two, uniqueness applies to both internal and external sources. Copying either one can be trouble. It could be that these are other pages on your site and these are other pages somewhere else on the web where this content exists, and you're taking from those and putting those pieces on your site. That can be a problem in either of those cases. Internal duplication, usually engines will try and ignore it if it's small and subtle, just happens here and there. It's like, "Oh, there are four different versions of this page because they've got a print version, a mobile version. Okay. We'll try and canonicalize and figure that out."

You would be wise in these situations to use something like a rel=canonical. Or if you're consolidating pages after a big site move or a re-architecturing, something like that, a 301 is proper. But you should also be aware that this can happen from external stuff.

However, when I say that, what I don't mean to say and what I know a lot of people get confused about in the SEO world is this doesn't mean that you can't take a paragraph from Wikipedia and put it in a bigger article that you're writing, or cite a blogger and include a couple of phrases that they say, or take a piece from New York Magazine or from the Wall Street Journal, from Wired, or wherever you want and take, "Oh hey, I'm going to caption this, and I'm going to have a little clip of it. I'm going to put a video that exists on YouTube already." That's not duplicative so long as you are adding unique value.

Number three, uniqueness alone, some people get lost in the minutiae of the rules around SEO, the rules around search engines and they think, "Well, this content exists nowhere else on the web. So I just took someone else's and I changed all the words." You have technically provided unique content, but you have not provided unique value. Unique value is a very different thing. What I mean when I say "unique value" and what the search engines would like you to do and are building algorithms around is providing value that no other sources, no other sites on the web are specifically providing. That could mean that you take a look at the visitor's intent, the searcher's intent or your customer's intent and you say, "Hey, I'm going to answer each of these things that this person is trying to achieve."

If somebody searches for hotels in Cape Town, South Africa, well they're probably looking for a listing of hotels, but they probably have other intents as well. They might be interested in other stuff related to traveling there. They could be wanting to know things about weather. They could be wanting to know things about neighborhoods where these hotels are located. So providing unique value as opposed to just, "Hey, I'm going to take the content from Expedia's website and then I'm also just going to rewrite the paragraph about the hotels specifically," that's not going to help you. But if you were to do something like what Oyster Hotels does, where they actually send a reporter with a camera, a journalist essentially, to the location, they take tons of their own unique photos, and they write about the weather and the neighborhood and the hotel cleanliness and investigate all these sorts of things and provide true, unique value as well as unique content, now you're hitting on what you need to achieve the uniqueness that search engines are talking about when they talk about unique versus duplicate.

Four, there's this imagination that exists in the minds of folks in the SEO field, and has for a long time, that there must be some mythical percentage. If over here, "Oh, this is 100% duplicate and this is 0% duplicate, 100% unique and this is the 50/50 mark, there must be some imaginary, magical, if I just get to like right here at 41%, that's the number. Therefore I'm going to create a huge website and all my pages just have to hit that 47% mark." That is dead wrong. Just totally wrong. There's nothing like this.

The algorithms that you might imagine are so much more sophisticated than an exact percentile of what is and isn't duplicate, even when it comes to just studying the content in here. That specific percentage doesn't exist. They use such a vast array of inputs. I'll give you some examples.

You can see, for example, that an article that might be published on many different news sites, after it moves out of Google news and into the Google main index, sometimes duplicates will appear, and oftentimes those duplicates are the ones that are the most linked to, the ones that have lots of comments on them, the ones that have been socially shared quite a bit, or where Google has seen user usage data behaviors or previous behaviors on those sites that suggests that each site provides some sort of unique value, even if the content is exactly the same.

Like Bloomberg and Business Week are constantly producing the same articles. Business Insider will produce articles from all over the place. Huffington Post will take articles from places that writers submit, and it'll be published in different places. People will publish on one site, and then they'll publish privately on their own blog. Sometimes Google will list both, sometimes they won't. It's not about a percentage. It's about the unique value that's provided, and it's about a very sophisticated algorithm that considers lots of other features.

If you are in a space where you're competing with other people who are posting the same content, think about unique value and think about getting the user usage data, the branding, the social shares, the links, all of those things will be taken into consideration when it comes to, "Are we going to rank your site or this other site that's licensing your content or from whom you are licensing content?" Domain authority can play a big role in there.

The last thing I want to mention is that duplicate and low value content, because of Google's Panda update from 2011, Panda means that low quality content, duplicative content that exists on one part of your site can actually harm your overall site. I'd be very cautious if you're thinking, "Hey, let's produce an article section on our site that's just these 5,000 articles that we licensed from this other place or that we're copying from someone's blog. We might not get much SEO value from it, but we will get a little bit of extra search engine traffic." In fact, that can hurt you because as the Panda algorithm runs its course and sees, "Boy, this site looks like it copied some stuff," they might hurt your rankings in other places.

Google's been very specific about this, that duplicate, low quality content in one area can harm you across your entire site. Be mindful of that. If you're nervous about it, you can robot.txt that stuff out so engines don't crawl it. You can rel=canonical it back up to a category page. You could even not include that in search engines. Use the disallow meta noindex, or you could do it inside your Google Webmaster Tools, disallow crawling of those pages. These are all options for that kind of stuff.

All right everyone. Hope you've enjoyed this edition of Whiteboard Friday and you'll go out there and create some unique and uniquely valuable content, and we'll see you again next week. Take care."

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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