Tag Archive | "Together"

Moz Acquires STAT Search Analytics: We’re Better Together!

Posted by SarahBird

We couldn’t be more thrilled to announce that Moz has acquired STAT Search Analytics!

It’s not hard to figure out why, right? We both share a vision around creating search solutions that will change the industry. We’re both passionate about investing in our customers’ success. Together we provide a massive breadth of high-quality, actionable data and insights for marketers. Combining Moz’s SEO research tools and local search expertise with STAT’s daily localized rankings and SERP analytics, we have the most robust organic search solution in the industry.

I recently sat down with my friend Rob Bucci, our new VP of Research & Development and most recently the CEO of STAT, to talk about how this came to be and what to expect next. Check it out:

You can also read Rob’s thoughts on everything here over on the STAT blog!

With our powers combined…

Over the past few months, Moz’s data has gotten some serious upgrades. Notably, with the launch of our new link index in April, the data that feeds our tools is now 35x larger and 30x fresher than it was before. In August we doubled our keyword corpus and expanded our data for the UK, Canada, and Australia, positioning us to lead the market in keyword research and link building tools. Throughout 2018, we’ve made significant improvements to Moz Local’s UI with a brand-new dashboard, making sure our business listing accuracy tool is as usable as it is useful. Driving the blood, sweat, and tears behind these upgrades is a simple purpose: to provide our customers with the best SEO tools money can buy.

STAT is intimately acquainted with this level of customer obsession. Their team has created the best enterprise-level SERP analysis software on the market. More than just rank tracking, STAT’s data is a treasure trove of consumer research, competitive intel, and the deep search analytics that enable SEOs to level up their game.

Moz + STAT together provide a breadth and depth of data that hasn’t existed before in our industry. Organic search shifts from tactics to strategy when you have this level of insight at your disposal, and we can’t wait to reveal what industry-changing products we’ll build together.

Our shared values and vision

Aside from the technology powerhouse this partnership will build, we also couldn’t have found a better culture fit than STAT. With values like selflessness, ambition, and empathy, STAT embodies TAGFEE. Moz and STAT are elated to be coming together as a single company dedicated to developing the best organic search solutions for our customers while also fostering an awesome culture for our employees.

Innovation awaits!

To Moz and STAT customers: the future is bright. Expect more updates, more innovation, and more high-quality data at your disposal than ever before. As we grow together, you’ll grow with us.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Moz Blog

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

Writing Headlines that Serve SEO, Social Media, and Website Visitors All Together – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

Have your headlines been doing some heavy lifting? If you’ve been using one headline to serve multiple audiences, you’re missing out on some key optimization opportunities. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand gives you a process for writing headlines for SEO, for social media, and for your website visitors — each custom-tailored to its audience and optimized to meet different goals.

Writing headlines that serve SEO, Social Media, and Website Visitors

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re going to chat about writing headlines. One of the big problems that headlines have is that they need to serve multiple audiences. So it’s not just ranking and search engines. Even if it was, the issue is that we need to do well on social media. We need to serve our website visitors well in order to rank in the search engines. So this gets very challenging.

I’ve tried to illustrate this with a Venn diagram here. So you can see, basically…

SEO

In the SEO world of headline writing, what I’m trying to do is rank well, earn high click-through rate, because I want a lot of those visitors to the search results to choose my result, not somebody else’s. I want low pogo-sticking. I don’t want anyone clicking the back button and choosing someone else’s result because I didn’t fulfill their needs. I need to earn links, and I’ve got to have engagement.

Social media

On the social media side, it’s pretty different actually. I’m trying to earn amplification, which can often mean the headline tells as much of the story as possible. Even if you don’t read the piece, you amplify it, you retweet it, and you re-share it. I’m looking for clicks, and I’m looking for comments and engagement on the post. I’m not necessarily too worried about that back button and the selection of another item. In fact, time on site might not even be a concern at all.

Website visitors

For website visitors, both of these are channels that drive traffic. But for the site itself, I’m trying to drive right visitors, the ones who are going to be loyal, who are going to come back, hopefully who are going to convert. I want to not confuse anyone. I want to deliver on my promise so that I don’t create a bad brand reputation and detract from people wanting to click on me in the future. For those of you have visited a site like Forbes or maybe even a BuzzFeed and you have an association of, “Oh, man, this is going to be that clickbait stuff. I don’t want to click on their stuff. I’m going to choose somebody else in the results instead of this brand that I remember having a bad experience with.”

Notable conflicts

There are some notable direct conflicts in here.

  1. Keywords for SEO can be really boring on social media sites. When you try and keyword stuff especially or be keyword-heavy, your social performance tends to go terribly.
  2. Creating mystery on social, so essentially not saying what the piece is truly about, but just creating an inkling of what it might be about harms the clarity that you need for search in order to rank well and in order to drive those clicks from a search engine. It also hurts your ability generally to do keyword targeting.
  3. The need for engagement and brand reputation that you’ve got for your website visitors is really going to hurt you if you’re trying to develop those clickbait-style pieces that do so well on social.
  4. In search, ranking for low-relevance keywords is going to drive very unhappy visitors, people who don’t care that just because you happen to rank for this doesn’t necessarily mean that you should, because you didn’t serve the visitor intent with the actual content.

Getting to resolution

So how do we resolve this? Well, it’s not actually a terribly hard process. In 2017 and beyond, what’s nice is that search engines and social and visitors all have enough shared stuff that, most of the time, we can get to a good, happy resolution.

Step one: Determine who your primary audience is, your primary goals, and some prioritization of those channels.

You might say, “Hey, this piece is really targeted at search. If it does well on social, that’s fine, but this is going to be our primary traffic driver.” Or you might say, “This is really for internal website visitors who are browsing around our site. If it happens to drive some traffic from search or social, well that’s fine, but that’s not our intent.”

Step two: For non-conflict elements, optimize for the most demanding channel.

For those non-conflicting elements, so this could be the page title that you use for SEO, it doesn’t always have to perfectly match the headline. If it’s a not-even-close match, that’s a real problem, but an imperfect match can still be okay.

So what’s nice in social is you have things like Twitter cards and the Facebook markup, graph markup. That Open Graph markup means that you can have slightly different content there than what you might be using for your snippet, your meta description in search engines. So you can separate those out or choose to keep those distinct, and that can help you as well.

Step three: Author the straightforward headline first.

I’m going to ask you author the most straightforward version of the headline first.

Step four: Now write the social-friendly/click-likely version without other considerations.

Is to write the opposite of that, the most social-friendly or click-likely/click-worthy version. It doesn’t necessarily have to worry about keywords. It doesn’t have to worry about accuracy or telling the whole story without any of these other considerations.

Step five: Merge 3 & 4, and add in critical keywords.

We’re going to take three and four and just merge them into something that will work for both, that compromises in the right way, compromises based on your primary audience, your primary goals, and then add in the critical keywords that you’re going to need.

Examples:

I’ve tried to illustrate this a bit with an example. Nest, which Google bought them years ago and then they became part of the Alphabet Corporation that Google evolved into. So Nest is separately owned by Alphabet, Google’s parent company. Nest came out with this new alarm system. In fact, the day we’re filming this Whiteboard Friday, they came out with a new alarm system. So they’re no longer just a provider of thermostats inside of houses. They now have something else.

Step one: So if I’m a tech news site and I’m writing about this, I know that I’m trying to target gadget and news readers. My primary channel is going to be social first, but secondarily search engines. The goal that I’m trying to reach, that’s engagement followed by visits and then hopefully some newsletter sign-ups to my tech site.

Step two: My title and headline in this case probably need to match very closely. So the social callouts, the social cards and the Open Graph, that can be unique from the meta description if need be or from the search snippet if need be.

Step three: I’m going to do step three, author the straightforward headline. That for me is going to be “Nest Has a New Alarm System, Video Doorbell, and Outdoor Camera.” A little boring, probably not going to tremendously well on social, but it probably would do decently well in search.

Step four: My social click-likely version is going to be something more like “Nest is No Longer Just a Thermostat. Their New Security System Will Blow You Away.” That’s not the best headline in the universe, but I’m not a great headline writer. However, you get the idea. This is the click-likely social version, the one that you see the headline and you go, “Ooh, they have a new security system. I wonder what’s involved in that.” You create some mystery. You don’t know that it includes a video doorbell, an outdoor camera, and an alarm. You just hear, “They’ve got a new security system. Well, I better look at it.”

Step five: Then I can try and compromise and say, “Hey, I know that I need to have video doorbell, camera, alarm, and Nest.” Those are my keywords. Those are the important ones. That’s what people are going to be searching for around this announcement, so I’ve got to have them in there. I want to have them close to the front. So “Nest’s New Alarm, Video Doorbell and Camera Are About to Be on Every Home’s Must-Have List.” All right, resolved in there.

So this process of writing headlines to serve these multiple different, sometimes competing priorities is totally possible with nearly everything you’re going to do in SEO and social and for your website visitors. This resolution process is something hopefully you can leverage to get better results.

All right, everyone, we’ll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Moz Blog

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

Alexa and Cortana will soon work together, allowing each to access the other

You’ll soon be able to ask Alexa to “open Cortana” and vice versa.

The post Alexa and Cortana will soon work together, allowing each to access the other appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

Cool-Headed Advice for Keeping It Together Just Before Your Book Launch

zb-book-pre-launch

Having a powerful launch is important, but it isn’t everything. “The biggest danger to an author,” says Jeff Goins, “is spending all their energy on a launch.”

Publishing your book is the first step in a long game. A published book isn’t urgent, so authors need to get out there, start banging the drum, and keep on banging it for a long time post-launch.

The trait that separates authors who succeed at getting their books in front of their intended audiences, and those who do not, comes down to perseverance.

In this episode Jeff Goins and Pamela Wilson discuss:

  • Jeff’s last-minute, pre-launch mindset tips
  • Compelling arguments for why the long game matters more than the launch
  • Why you should never underestimate the power of people’s awareness of your book
  • The reason it’s imperative to keep talking about your book long after the launch is done

Listen to this Episode Now

The post Cool-Headed Advice for Keeping It Together Just Before Your Book Launch appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

Related Articles

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

Bundle Like a Boss: How to Put Together Irresistible Product Packages

how to create winning product bundles

Would you like to make more sales — and more money per sale?

Stupid question, I know.

One really simple way to get both is to create an irresistible bundle of products that your audience can’t wait to get their hands on.

Let’s say you’ve created your first minimum viable product. In fact, you’ve done more than that: You’ve been offering digital products for quite a while now.

But you’ve seen other entrepreneurs sell some amazing offerings — big bundles of desirable products. Maybe you’d like to offer your audience something similar, but you’re just not sure where to begin.

Here’s how to get started.

Essential ingredients every winning product bundle needs

Grabbing a few products from your shop and chucking them together doesn’t create an inviting bundle. Buyers will ignore your offer if they don’t want most of your products — even if your price is low.

There are two key ways to create your bundle:

  1. Put together several similar products. Your bundle could be the best 10 seminars from your membership site, four of your ebooks, or six video tutorials.
  2. Put together several different types of products that cover the same topic. For example, if you have an ebook about snail collecting, along with a live seminar you recorded plus several detailed infographics, then that could make a great bundle for all the snail collectors in your audience.

In either case, it helps if most of the products in the bundle have been on sale separately and individually, so you can reference a distinct dollar value for each item — and demonstrate how much money your buyers will save by getting the bundle deal.

Don’t be tempted to simply create a massive bundle that includes everything in your shop — unless there’s a clear correlation between all the products.

(One exception: If you’re closing your shop and taking down all your existing products permanently, a huge bundle of everything could make sense.)

What if I don’t have enough products for a bundle?

If you think you don’t have enough material to create a product bundle, you could:

  • Add more details to an old blog post or podcast. Specifically address the “how” as well as the “why.” You could produce step-by-step instructions or provide real-world examples.
  • Transform existing products into new formats. If you have a bunch of audio seminars, get them transcribed. If you have screenshots explaining a process, consider creating your own video. Different buyers will prefer different formats, so having multiple options raises the perceived value of your bundle.
  • Bundle services with your products. If you offer one-on-one coaching for snail collectors, your bundle could include a 30-minute consultation. Put limits on the services you offer and position them as a “bonus” rather than the core material of the bundle, so you don’t have to raise the price to include them.

Partner with other product creators

You don’t have to create your whole bundle by yourself. Many successful bundles are group efforts. These collaborations work in different ways. For instance, you could:

  • Have one primary creator (you), and request supplementary materials from several others. Someone with an in-depth ebook might be willing to provide an exclusive sample for your bundle if you link to the ebook’s sales page.
  • Get together with a partner who has complementary products to yours. Find items that aren’t in direct competition but appeal to the same audience. An ebook on SEO and one on using Google Analytics might form a cohesive bundle.
  • Create a massive bundle along with a number of other big players in your industry. Only72 does this on a regular basis with packages that appeal to entrepreneurs.

Working with others takes more planning, and possibly presents more of a risk, but it could also mean more reward.

Keep in mind that the quality of other people’s products could affect your reputation. Make sure you know and trust everyone you work with and, if possible, thoroughly review (and try) their products to ensure you’d like to be associated with them.

Package your product bundle for a superior customer experience

You want to put everything in your product bundle together in an easy-to-use way. If you’ve only ever sold individual products before, you might find this requires a bit more work.

While you could just shove all of your digital files into a single zip file, that’s not going to create a great experience for buyers.

Instead, consider one or more of these options:

  • Use subfolders for individual products that contain multiple files, so each folder is easy to navigate. I’ve even seen bundles that used HTML to create a mini, offline site that buyers could use to easily navigate around the bundle.
  • Include a Quick-Start Guide that helps orient buyers and suggests the best ways to start engaging with the package. It could include directions about the correct order to approach the material. For instance, your customer should first read the ebook and then listen to the audio content.
  • Create a password-protected page on your website that has all the product files. I find that a small number of buyers have problems unzipping files, and so it’s best to point people to a page where they can download files at their leisure.

Don’t forget to pay attention to file names, too; make them clear and self-explanatory. A cryptic acronym plus a version number won’t help your buyers much.

Create the right digital product bundle for the right audience

What products could you pull together into a really useful bundle right now?

What might you need to add (either by creating it yourself or by bringing someone else on board)?

Start getting your plan together now — you might just surprise yourself with how close you are to producing and selling an irresistible bundle.

Share your digital product package ideas with us over on LinkedIn …

About the Author: Ali Luke runs Writers’ Huddle, a community/teaching site for all writers, with monthly seminars, in-depth ecourses, supportive forums, and more. It only opens to new members a couple of times a year, so if you think you might be interested, check it out now.

The post Bundle Like a Boss: How to Put Together Irresistible Product Packages appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

SPONSOR MESSAGE: Content Marketing & Link Building Together

Join us Tuesday, August 5th at 1:00 EDT (10:00 PDT) to hear Jon Ball, Page One Power’s co-founder and CEO, discuss content marketing and its impact on link building. Attendees will learn why links are still relevant and how link building and content marketing work together. You’ll also learn…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

Cats & Dogs Living Together: Bing Promotes Firefox

If you ever wanted proof that Microsoft has learned that for Bing to succeed, it needs to spread its wings beyond Microsoft, look no further than today’s news that Bing is offering “Firefox With Bing.” That’s right, Microsoft is pushing a rival browser to its own Internet…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.




Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off


Advert