Tag Archive | "Quick"

NEW On-Demand Crawl: Quick Insights for Sales, Prospecting, & Competitive Analysis

Posted by Dr-Pete

In June of 2017, Moz launched our entirely rebuilt Site Crawl, helping you dive deep into crawl issues and technical SEO problems, fix those issues in your Moz Pro Campaigns (tracked websites), and monitor weekly for new issues. Many times, though, you need quick insights outside of a Campaign context, whether you’re analyzing a prospect site before a sales call or trying to assess the competition.

For years, Moz had a lab tool called Crawl Test. The bad news is that Crawl Test never made it to prime-time and suffered from some neglect. The good news is that I’m happy to announce the full launch (as of August 2018) of On-Demand Crawl, an entirely new crawl tool built on the engine that powers Site Crawl, but with a UI designed around quick insights for prospecting and competitive analysis.

While you don’t need a Campaign to run a crawl, you do need to be logged into your Moz Pro subscription. If you don’t have a subscription, you can sign-up for a free trial and give it a whirl.

How can you put On-Demand Crawl to work? Let’s walk through a short example together.


All you need is a domain

Getting started is easy. From the “Moz Pro” menu, find “On-Demand Crawl” under “Research Tools”:

Just enter a root domain or subdomain in the box at the top and click the blue button to kick off a crawl. While I don’t want to pick on anyone, I’ve decided to use a real site. Our recent analysis of the August 1st Google update identified some sites that were hit hard, and I’ve picked one (lilluna.com) from that list.

Please note that Moz is not affiliated with Lil’ Luna in any way. For the most part, it seems to be a decent site with reasonably good content. Let’s pretend, just for this post, that you’re looking to help this site out and determine if they’d be a good fit for your SEO services. You’ve got a call scheduled and need to spot-check for any major problems so that you can go into that call as informed as possible.

On-Demand Crawls aren’t instantaneous (crawling is a big job), but they’ll generally finish between a few minutes and an hour. We know these are time-sensitive situations. You’ll soon receive an email that looks like this:

The email includes the number of URLs crawled (On-Demand will currently crawl up to 3,000 URLs), the total issues found, and a summary table of crawl issues by category. Click on the [View Report] link to dive into the full crawl data.


Assess critical issues quickly

We’ve designed On-Demand Crawl to assist your own human intelligence. You’ll see some basic stats at the top, but then immediately move into a graph of your top issues by count. The graph only displays issues that occur at least once on your site – you can click “See More” to show all of the issues that On-Demand Crawl tracks (the top two bars have been truncated)…

Issues are also color-coded by category. Some items are warnings, and whether they matter depends a lot on context. Other issues, like “Critcal Errors” (in red) almost always demand attention. So, let’s check out those 404 errors. Scroll down and you’ll see a list of “Pages Crawled” with filters. You’re going to select “4xx” in the “Status Codes” dropdown…

You can then pretty easily spot-check these URLs and find out that they do, in fact, seem to be returning 404 errors. Some appear to be legitimate content that has either internal or external links (or both). So, within a few minutes, you’ve already found something useful.

Let’s look at those yellow “Meta Noindex” errors next. This is a tricky one, because you can’t easily determine intent. An intentional Meta Noindex may be fine. An unintentional one (or hundreds of unintentional ones) could be blocking crawlers and causing serious harm. Here, you’ll filter by issue type…

Like the top graph, issues appear in order of prevalence. You can also filter by all pages that have issues (any issues) or pages that have no issues. Here’s a sample of what you get back (the full table also includes status code, issue count, and an option to view all issues)…

Notice the “?s=” common to all of these URLs. Clicking on a few, you can see that these are internal search pages. These URLs have no particular SEO value, and the Meta Noindex is likely intentional. Good technical SEO is also about avoiding false alarms because you lack internal knowledge of a site. On-Demand Crawl helps you semi-automate and summarize insights to put your human intelligence to work quickly.


Dive deeper with exports

Let’s go back to those 404s. Ideally, you’d like to know where those URLs are showing up. We can’t fit everything into one screen, but if you scroll up to the “All Issues” graph you’ll see an “Export CSV” option…

The export will honor any filters set in the page list, so let’s re-apply that “4xx” filter and pull the data. Your export should download almost immediately. The full export contains a wealth of information, but I’ve zeroed in on just what’s critical for this particular case…

Now, you know not only what pages are missing, but exactly where they link from internally, and can easily pass along suggested fixes to the customer or prospect. Some of these turn out to be link-heavy pages that could probably benefit from some clean-up or updating (if newer recipes are a good fit).

Let’s try another one. You’ve got 8 duplicate content errors. Potentially thin content could fit theories about the August 1st update, so this is worth digging into. If you filter by “Duplicate Content” issues, you’ll see the following message…

The 8 duplicate issues actually represent 18 pages, and the table returns all 18 affected pages. In some cases, the duplicates will be obvious from the title and/or URL, but in this case there’s a bit of mystery, so let’s pull that export file. In this case, there’s a column called “Duplicate Content Group,” and sorting by it reveals something like the following (there’s a lot more data in the original export file)…

I’ve renamed “Duplicate Content Group” to just “Group” and included the word count (“Words”), which could be useful for verifying true duplicates. Look at group #7 – it turns out that these “Weekly Menu Plan” pages are very image heavy and have a common block of text before any unique text. While not 100% duplicated, these otherwise valuable pages could easily look like thin content to Google and represent a broader problem.


Real insights in real-time

Not counting the time spent writing the blog post, running this crawl and diving in took less than an hour, and even that small amount of time spent uncovered more potential issues than what I could cover in this post. In less than an hour, you can walk into a client meeting or sales call with in-depth knowledge of any domain.

Keep in mind that many of these features also exist in our Site Crawl tool. If you’re looking for long-term, campaign insights, use Site Crawl (if you just need to update your data, use our “Recrawl” feature). If you’re looking for quick, one-time insights, check out On-Demand Crawl. Standard Pro users currently get 5 On-Demand Crawls per month (with limits increasing at higher tiers).

Your On-Demand Crawls are currently stored for 90 days. When you re-enter the feature, you’ll see a table of all of your recent crawls (the image below has been truncated):

Click on any row to go back to see the crawl data for that domain. If you get the sale and decide to move forward, congratulations! You can port that domain directly into a Moz campaign.

We hope you’ll try On-Demand Crawl out and let us know what you think. We’d love to hear your case studies, whether it’s sales, competitive analysis, or just trying to solve the mysteries of a Google update.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Moz Blog

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

A Quick, Punchy Week on Copyblogger

This was a short week on Copyblogger, as we took Monday off in observance of Memorial Day. On Tuesday, Stefanie Flaxman wrote about one of my favorite topics — the Necessary Mess, and why writers need it. She gives some helpful tips on how to get comfortable with the funky stuff that comes before the
Read More…

The post A Quick, Punchy Week on Copyblogger appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

Related Articles

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

The SEO Quick Fix: Competitor Keywords, Redirect Chains, and Duplicate Content, Oh My!

Posted by ErinMcCaul

I have a eight-month-old baby. As a mom my time is at a premium, and I’ve come to appreciate functionalities I didn’t know existed in things I already pay for. My HBONow subscription has Game of Thrones AND Sesame Street? Fantastic! Overnight diapers can save me a trip to the tiny airplane bathroom on a quick flight? Sweet! Oxiclean keeps my towels fluffy and vanquishes baby poop stains? Flip my pancakes!

Moz Pro isn’t just a tool for link building, or keyword research, or on-page SEO, or crawling your site. It does all those things and a little bit more, simplifying your SEO work and saving time. And if you’ve run into an SEO task you’re not sure how to tackle, it’s possible that a tool you need is right here just waiting to be found! It’s in this spirit that we’ve revived our SEO Quick Fix videos. These 2–3 minute Mozzer-led tutorials are meant to help you get the most out of our tools, and offer simple solutions to common SEO problems.

Take Moz Pro for a spin!

Today we’ll focus on a few Keyword Explorer and Site Crawl tips. I hope these knowledge nuggets bring you the joy I experienced the moment I realized my son doesn’t care whether I read him The Name of the Wind or Goodnight Moon.

Let’s dive in!

Fix #1 – Keyword Explorer: Finding keyword suggestions that are questions

Search queries all have intent (“when to give my baby water” was a hot Google search at my house recently). Here’s the good news: Research shows that if you’re already ranking in the top ten positions, providing the best answers to specific questions can earn you a coveted Featured Snippet!

Featured snippet example

In this video, April from our Customer Success Team will show you how to pull a list of keyword phrases that cover the who, what, where, when, why, and how of all the related topics for keywords you’re already ranking for. Here’s the rub. Different questions call for different Featured Snippet formats. For example, “how” and “have” questions tend to result in list-based snippets, while “which” questions often result in tables. When you’re crafting your content, be mindful of the type of question you’re targeting and format accordingly.

Looking for more resources? Once you’ve got your list, check out AJ Ghergich’s article on the Moz Blog for some in-depth insight on formatting and optimizing your snippets. High five!


Fix #2 – Site Crawl: Optimize the content on your site

Sometimes if I find a really good pair of pants, I buy two (I mean, it’s really hard to find good pants). In this case duplicates are good, but the rules of pants don’t always apply to content. Chiaryn is here to teach you how to use Site Crawl to identify duplicate content and titles, and uncover opportunities to help customers and bots find more relevant content on your site.

When reviewing your duplicate content, keep a few things in mind:

  • Does this page provide value to visitors?
  • Title tags are meant to give searchers a taste of what your content is about, and meant to help bots understand and categorize your content. You want your title tags to be relevant and unique to your content.
  • If pages with different content have the same title tag, re-write your tags to make them more relevant to your page content. Use our Title Tag Preview tool to help out.
  • Thin content isn’t always a bad thing, but it’s still a good opportunity to make sure your page is performing as expected — and update it as necessary with meaningful content.
  • Check out Jo Cameron’s post about How to Turn Low-Value Content Into Neatly Organized Opportunities for more snazzy tips on duplicate content and Site Crawl!

Fix #3 – Keyword Explorer: Identify your competitors’ top keywords

Cozily nestled under a few clicks, Keyword Explorer holds the keys to a competitive research sweet spot. By isolating the ranking keywords you have in common with your competitors, you can pinpoint their weak spots and discover keywords that are low-hanging fruit — phrases you have the content and authority to rank for that, with a little attention, could do even better. In this video, Janisha shows you how targeting a competitor’s low-ranking keywords can earn you a top spot in the SERPS.

Finding competitors' keywords: A Venn diagram

Check out all that overlapped opportunity!

For a few more tips along this line, check out Hayley Sherman’s post, How to Use Keyword Explorer to Identify Competitive Keyword Opportunities.


Fix #4 – Site Crawl: Identify and fix redirect chains

Redirects are a handy way to get a visitor from a page they try to land on, to the page you want them to land on. Redirect chains, however, are redirects gone wrong. They look something like this: URL A redirects to URL B, URL B redirects to URL C… and so on and so forth.

These redirect chains can negatively impact your rankings, slow your site load times, and make it hard for crawlers to properly index your site.

Meghan from our Help team is here to show you how to find redirect chains, understand where they currently exist, and help you cut a few of those pesky middle redirects.

Looking for a few other redirect resources? I’ve got you covered:


Alright friends, that’s a wrap! Like the end of The Last Jedi, you might not be ready for this post to be over. Fear not! Our blog editor liked my jokes so much that she’s promised to harp on me to write more blog posts. So, I need your help! Find yourself facing an SEO snafu that doesn’t seem to have a straightforward fix? Let me know in the comments. I might know a Moz tool that can help, and you might inspire another Quick Fix post!

Get a free month of Moz Pro

If you’re still interested in checking out more solutions, here’s a list of some of my favorite resources:

Stay cool!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Moz Blog

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

Struggling to Finish Your Blog Post? Try This Quick Editing Tip

Publishing content regularly — and striving to improve with each new creation — is a proven way to figure out how to serve your audience and meet your business goals. But I have other things to do besides writing content, and you do too. Recently, I had trouble finishing a draft of a post and
Read More…

The post Struggling to Finish Your Blog Post? Try This Quick Editing Tip appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

3 Quick Tips to Help You Get the Most Out of the Remainder of your Holiday Marketing Efforts

Since there are only 24 shopping days left this gift-giving season, we thought we’d share some quick tips you can apply to your last-minute holiday marketing efforts.
MarketingSherpa Blog

More Articles

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

Here’s a Quick Sneak Peek at This Year’s Massive Black Friday Discount

The crowds. The lines. The noise. The endless circling to find parking. Black Friday is an American institution — and for good reason. Commerce is king, humans like to save money, and Black Friday marries those two together unlike any other date on the calendar. But over the last handful of years, something has come
Read More…

The post Here’s a Quick Sneak Peek at This Year’s Massive Black Friday Discount appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

A Quick Copywriting Lesson Taken Directly from an Email Marketing Fail

"Reveal the details that compel your prospect to take action immediately." – Stefanie Flaxman

Ten years ago, a tattoo shop I went to subscribed my email address to their email newsletter.

They didn’t send updates very often, so I never unsubscribed. However, new owners recently acquired the business — and apparently their email newsletter list — because lately I’ve been getting not very good emails more frequently.

I should have unsubscribed after receiving the first few, but I kept forgetting. I’d just scroll through an email quickly and delete it.

And I’m glad that was my routine, because today I have a copywriting lesson to share that I took directly from a mistake they made in an email they sent last week.

What was the email marketing mistake?

The first three paragraphs of the email contained too many comma splices and exclamation marks for my taste, but those goofs didn’t bother me too much.

As I continued to scroll down, a photo caught my eye and I wanted to read more about the tattoos in the image.

But when I looked at the caption below the photo, it said:

“Create a great offer by adding words like ‘free,’ ‘personalized,’ ‘complimentary,’ or ‘customized.’ A sense of urgency often helps readers take an action, so think about inserting phrases like ‘for a limited time only’ or ‘only 7 remaining!’”

The person who wrote the email didn’t fill out that section of their template and forgot to delete the placeholder text. Although that’s a forgivable mistake that any busy person could easily make, it communicates a bit of carelessness.

If someone else proofread the email, they would have caught the error before it was transmitted to everyone on their list.

Even though I’m not interested in getting any new tattoos in the near future, I’m a potential customer to the shop and they didn’t take steps to demonstrate that their business pays attention to details. I was also disappointed that there wasn’t a caption with descriptions about the tattoos.

All businesses need to establish trust with prospects, and that’s especially true when you use needles and ink to permanently mark your customers.

What’s special about your offer?

So, now that I’ve reminded you to double-check all the information you send to your email list, let’s discuss the copywriting lesson that was accidentally sent to me:

What else can you add to make a reader say “yes?”

When you’re ready to make an offer, the first part suggests including words like:

  • Free
  • Personalized
  • Complimentary
  • Customized

If you craft your own content and copy, you may take information you’re quite familiar with for granted. See if you’ve forgotten to communicate any powerful benefits as you review your writing.

The second part suggests creating a sense of urgency with phrases like:

  • For a limited time only
  • Only 7 remaining!

Ultimately, you want to reveal the details that compel your prospect to take action immediately.

Talk to one person intimately, as if you’re sharing the secrets of a great deal they need to act on right away. Explain why it wouldn’t make sense to wait.

Some speculation, just for fun …

I’ve been thinking about possible reasons why the tattoo shop left that portion of the email template blank.

In addition to the likely possibility that it was an absentminded error, I’m speculating that they did not intend to make any direct call to action in this email, so they ignored the “create a great offer with a sense of urgency” suggestion.

My assumption is that they mainly want to provide interesting and useful content to their audience in order to build relationships with people who will eventually become customers.

Unfortunately, they didn’t persuade me to continue a relationship with them. I’ve now unsubscribed.

The post A Quick Copywriting Lesson Taken Directly from an Email Marketing Fail appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

Don’t get duped by duplicate content: 8 quick checks for every SEO

Duplicate content can often arise without our knowledge, despite our best efforts to prevent it. Columnist Stephanie LeVonne shows how you can identify and fix it.

The post Don’t get duped by duplicate content: 8 quick checks for every SEO appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

B2B Mobile Marketing for Demand Generation? Yes! Examples and Quick Tips

B2B Mobile MarketingWhen you think of mobile marketing, visions of searches for store hours, maps and getting tips from Facebook friends about good restaurants probably come to mind – all consumer focused. But what about B2B marketing and mobile?

Why mobile marketing for B2B demand generation:
In many countries, including the U.S., more Google searches take place on mobile devices than on computers. (Google). That means B2B demand gen content must be mobile friendly.  Also, 52% of B2B customers are using smartphones to research products for their businesses. (Forrester) so the demand is certainly there.

So which B2B companies using mobile marketing can we learn from?

Here are a few examples:

Fedex Access Mobile Magazine
ACCESS is a FedEx Corp publication available for mobile consumption through iPad, Kindle Fire and Android devices. The ACCESS mobile magazine app offers interactive features designed specifically for tablets and Android smartphones, including videos and dynamic slideshows.

Power More Dell Mobile
Power More is a Dell content platform that provides customized content to technology decision-makers optimized for mobile devices.
 (Disclosure, Dell is a TopRank Marketing client)

Gateway Emerson Mobile
Gateway to Emerson is an iPad app that is among numerous mobile apps and mobile optimized experiences launched by Emerson Electric Co.for their businesses including
Emerson Climate Technologies Apps
multiple iPhone and iPad apps for Emerson Climate Technologies.

3M Post-it® Plus App
3M’s Post-it® Plus
 app for iPhone and iPad enables users to capture images of their Post-it notes, share and collaborate with other business people.

To put mobile marketing to work for your own B2B demand gen programs, here are a few “quick hit” tactics to implement:

1. Optimize for Mobile: At a minimum, marketers can ensure their websites are optimized for mobile experiences. Whether the site is simply responsive and adaptable across devices, a dedicated mobile site is created or an app – B2B marketers should learn their customer’s preferences for mobile content discovery and consumption so those content experiences can be optimized.

Not sure if your site is mobile friendly? Use Google’s tool.

2. Faster Mobile Content FTW! Also, make sure your demand gen content loads quickly in mobile devices or it can suffer in mobile search engine rankings. Check your website’s page load speed with this tool from Google.

3. Make video mobile ready. Video is a top content type consumed on mobile devices, 61% of B2B users watch mobile video relating to their work (IDG). But some video formats and hosting platforms only work on desktops. Make sure your B2B video content is mobile friendly for the best possible experience for your prospects.

By creating content that can be discovered, consumed and interacted with in ways your B2B buyers prefer, you can optimize your ability to attract, engage and convert more leads, deals and revenue. That sounds like a perfect opportunity for B2B marketers, don’t you think?

Top photo: Shutterstock


Email Newsletter
Gain a competitive advantage by subscribing to the
TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2015. |
B2B Mobile Marketing for Demand Generation? Yes! Examples and Quick Tips | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post B2B Mobile Marketing for Demand Generation? Yes! Examples and Quick Tips appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

Quick & Easy Guide to Tracking Across Multiple Domains & Subdomains in Google Analytics

Posted by Tom.Capper

Out of the box, Google Analytics handles being deployed across multiple domains or subdomains extremely poorly. This is easily the most common critical problem in Google Analytics, despite its being relatively easy to fix.

Depending on your situation, one or more of a few simple steps may be appropriate. Look for the entry in the left-hand column below that best describes your situation, and make sure you’ve taken the steps listed on the right:

Situation Implementation Check-list
Single subdomain
  • Standard Google Analytics
Multiple subdomains or domains, which are treated as separate sites
Multiple subdomains on a single domain which are treated as a single site
Multiple domains with one or more subdomains that are treated as a single site

As a word of warning, several steps in this document differ according to the tracking code in use, and in these cases I suggest options for each tracking code type. If you’re unsure of your current implementation:

  • ga.js / doubeclick.js: Your source code will contain several “_gaq.push” commands
  • analytics.js tracking code: Your source code will contain “ga(‘create’” and “ga(‘send’” commands
  • Google Tag Manager: You have an analytics tag in your Google Tag Manager account (which I will assume is set to “Universal Analytics”)

If you have updated your Google Analytics interface to Universal Analytics but you’re still using the old code, you should follow the recommendations for the old (ga.js / doubleclick.js) tracking code here.

Using separate tracking IDs

Tracking IDs are the unique codes that you’re given when you create a Google Analytics property, and look something like “UA-123456-1″. Any page with that tracking ID, regardless of the site it’s on, will send data to that property.

While it is possible to use the same tracking ID across multiple domains or subdomains and then view them each in isolation using filtered views, the only advantage of doing so is having access to one aggregated view. For the data in this aggregated view to be meaningful, it will need to ignore self-referrals, and this is configured at the property level, meaning that all views will ignore self-referrals, thus leaving the (sub)domain-specific views with a load of “direct” traffic that actually came from sister sites.

This means that you end up choosing between incorrect data in your aggregate view and incorrect data in your specific view. If you do want to be able to have meaningful data in both specific and aggregate views, you could consider having one tracking ID that’s used across all sites and additional tracking IDs for each individual site. For details on implementation, check Google’s guidelines
here (and also here if you use Google Tag Manager).

Ignoring self-referrals

A “self-referral” is when one of the sources of traffic to your own site is your own site. They make it very difficult to work out what channels are being effective in driving conversions, because they leave you with missing data for some sessions.

Self referrals don’t just screw up your attribution data. They also trigger new sessions, thus ruining your key metrics and making it extremely hard to track the routes individuals take through your site. Fortunately, they’re really easy to deal with.

If you have the old ga.js (or doubleclick.js) tracking code, simply add your domains as ignored referrers in your tracking code:

If you need to ignore multiple domains using ga.js or doubleclick.js tracking code, add multiple lines like this one. In either case, make sure that they come between the “setAccount” and “trackPageview” lines.

If you’re using analytics.js tracking code, it’s even easier:

Navigate to Admin -> Tracking Info -> Referral Exclusion list, and you can add any referrers you want to ignore. Note that although this feature can appear in your Google Analytics user interface even if you’re using the old ga.js tracking code, it will only work with analytics.js.

Prepend hostname to request URIs

A “hostname” is the name that Google Analytics gives to the subdomain that a pageview originated from. Request URIs are the names you see in reports when you set a dimension like “landing page”, “page” or “previous page path”.

Any view that includes data from multiple domains or subdomains runs the risk of aggregating data from multiple pages and considering them the same page. For example, if your site includes “blog.example.com/index.html” and “example.com/index.html”, these will be merged in reports under “/index.html”, and you’ll never have any idea how effective or otherwise your blog and homepage are.

You can overcome this using an advanced filter:

In the example, this means that we’d see “www.example.com/index.html” as a page in reports, rather than just “/index.html”, and metrics that rely on telling the difference between the pages will report their real levels.

Ga.js / doubleclick.js only: Set domain name

For users of the new analytics.js tracking code or a Universal Analytics tag in Google Tag Manager, this step is unnecessary: Unless configured to do otherwise, the cookie is now automatically stored at the highest level possible so as to avoid being subdomain-specific. However, when using the old tracking code, Google Analytics needs a cookie location to be set in the tracking code so that it doesn’t lose it when moving between subdomains.

All this means in practice is a simple additional line in your tracking code, between the “_setAccount” and “_trackPageview” lines:

This should always be set to your domain without any subdomain – e.g. moz.com, distilled.net – not
www.moz.com or www.distilled.net.

Cross-domain linking

By default, Google Analytics looks for a cookie on the same domain as the page. If it doesn’t find one, it assumes that a new visit has just begun, and starts a new session. When moving between domains, the cookie cannot be transferred, so information about the session must be passed by “decorating” links with tracking information.

Don’t panic; this recently got dozens of times easier with the advent of the
autoLink plugin for analytics.js. If your site spans multiple domains and you’re not already using Google’s latest analytics tracking code, this feature should justify the upgrade on its own.

If you can’t upgrade for any reason, I won’t cover the necessary steps for the old ga.js tracking code in this post, but you can find Google’s documentation
here.

If you’re using on-page analytics.js tracking code, you can implement the autoLink plugin by making some modifications to your tracking code:

  1. Tells analytics.js to check whether the linker parameter exists in the URL and is less than 2 minutes old
  2. Loads the autoLink plugin
  3. The autoLink command is passed domains and two parameters. The first sets whether the linking parameters are in the anchor (rather than the query) portion of the URL, and the second enables form decoration (as well as link decoration).

In Google Tag Manager, it’s easier still, and just requires two additional options in your Universal Analytics tag:

In conclusion

Setting up analytics to properly handle multiple domains or subdomains isn’t difficult, and not bothering will invalidate your data. If you have any questions or tips, please share them in the comments below.

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


Moz Blog

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

Advert