Tag Archive | "Moz’s"

Faster, Fresher, Better: Announcing Link Explorer, Moz’s New Link Building Tool

Posted by SarahBird

More link data. Fresher link data. Faster link data.

Today, I’m delighted to share that after eons of hard work, blood, sweat, tears, and love, Moz is taking a major step forward on our commitment to provide the best SEO tools money can buy.

We’ve rebuilt our link technology from the ground up and the data is now broadly available throughout Moz tools. It’s bigger, fresher, and much, much faster than our legacy link tech. And we’re just getting started! The best way to quickly understand the potential power of our revolutionary new link tech is to play with the beta of our Link Explorer.

Introducing Link Explorer, the newest addition to the Moz toolset!

We’ve heard your frustrations with Open Site Explorer and we know that you want more from Moz and your link building tools. OSE has done more than put in its time. Groundbreaking when it launched in 2008, it’s worked long and hard to bring link data to the masses. It deserves the honor of a graceful retirement.

OSE represents our past; the new Link Explorer is our fast, innovative, ambitious future.

Here are some of my favorite things about the Link Explorer beta:

  • It’s 20x larger and 30x fresher than OSE (RIP)
  • Despite its huge index size, the app is lightning fast! I can’t stand waiting so this might be my number-one fav improvement.
  • We’re introducing Link Tracking Lists to make managing your link building efforts a breeze. Sometimes the simple things make the biggest difference, like when they started making vans with doors on each side. You’ll never go back.
  • Link Explorer includes historic data, a painful gap in OSE. Studying your gained/lost linking domains is fast and easy.
  • The new UX surfaces competitive insights much more quickly
  • Increases the size and freshness of the index improved the quality of Domain Authority and Spam Score. Voilà.

All this, and we’re only in beta.

Dive into your link data now!

Here’s a deeper dive into my favorites:

#1: The sheer size, quality, and speed of it all

We’re committed to data quality. Here are some ways that shows up in the Moz tools:

  • When we collect rankings, we evaluate the natural first page of rankings to ensure that the placement and content of featured snippets and other SERP features are correctly situated (as can happen when ranking are collected in 50- or 100-page batches). This is more expensive, but we think the tradeoff is worth it.
  • We were the first to build a hybrid search volume model using clickstream data. We still believe our model is the most accurate.
  • Our SERP corpus, which powers Keywords by Site, is completely refreshed every two weeks. We actively update up to 15 million of the keywords each month to remove keywords that are no longer being searched and replace them with trending keywords and terms. This helps keep our keyword data set fresh and relevant.

The new Link Explorer index extends this commitment to data quality. OSE wasn’t cutting it and we’re thrilled to unleash this new tech.

Link Explorer is over 20x larger and 30x fresher than our legacy link index. Bonus points: the underlying technology is very cost-efficient, making it much less expensive for us to scale over time. This frees up resources to focus on feature delivery. BOOM!

One of my top pet peeves is waiting. I feel physical pain while waiting in lines and for apps to load. I can’t stand growing old waiting for a page to load (amirite?).

The new Link Explorer app is delightfully, impossibly fast. It’s like magic. That’s how link research should be. Magical.

#2: Historical data showing discovered and lost linking domains

If you’re a visual person, this report gives you an immediate idea of how your link building efforts are going. A spike you weren’t expecting could be a sign of spam network monkey business. Deep-dive effortlessly on the links you lost and gained so you can spend your valuable time doing thoughtful, human outreach.

#3: Link Tracking Lists

Folks, this is a big one. Throw out (at least one of… ha. ha.) those unwieldy spreadsheets and get on board with Link Tracking Lists, because these are the future. Have you been chasing a link from a particular site? Wondering if your outreach emails have borne fruit yet? Want to know if you’ve successfully placed a link, and how you’re linking? Link Tracking Lists cut out a huge time-suck when it comes to checking back on which of your target sites have actually linked back to you.

Why announce the beta today?

We’re sharing this now for a few reasons:

  • The new Link Explorer data and app have been available in beta to a limited audience. Even with a quiet, narrow release, the SEO community has been talking about it and asking good questions about our plans. Now that the Link Explorer beta is in broad release throughout all of Moz products and the broader Moz audience can play with it, we’re expecting even more curiosity and excitement.
  • If you’re relying on our legacy link technology, this is further notice to shift your applications and reporting to the new-and-improved tech. OSE will be retired soon! We’re making it easier for API customers to get the new data by providing a translation layer for the legacy API.
  • We want and need your feedback. We are committed to building the very best link building tool on the planet. You can expect us to invest heavily here. We need your help to guide our efforts and help us make the most impactful tradeoffs. This is your invitation to shape our roadmap.

Today’s release of our new Link Explorer technology is a revolution in Moz tools, not an evolution. We’ve made a major leap forward in our link index technology that delivers a ton of immediate value to Moz customers and the broader Moz Community.

Even though there are impactful improvements around the corner, this ambitious beta stands on its own two feet. OSE wasn’t cutting it and we’re proud of this new, fledgling tech.

What’s on the horizon for Link Explorer?

We’ve got even more features coming in the weeks and months ahead. Please let us know if we’re on the right track.

  • Link Building Assistant: a way to quickly identify new link acquisition opportunities
  • A more accurate and useful Link Intersect feature
  • Link Alerts to notify you when you get a link from a URL you were tracking in a list
  • Changes to how we count redirects: Currently we don’t count links to a redirect as links to the target of the redirect (that’s a lot of redirects), but we have this planned for the future.
  • Significantly scaling up our crawling to further improve freshness and size

Go forth, and explore:

Try the new Link Explorer!

Tomorrow Russ Jones will be sharing a post that discusses the importance of quality metrics when it comes to a link index, and don’t miss our pinned Q&A post answering questions about Domain Authority and Page Authority changes or our FAQ in the Help Hub.

We’ll be releasing early and often. Watch this space, and don’t hold back your feedback. Help us shape the future of Links at Moz. We’re listening!

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Moz’s Link Data Used to Suck… But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

Earlier this week we launched our brand-new link building tool, and we’re happy to say that Link Explorer addresses and improves upon a lot of the big problems that have plagued our legacy link tool, Open Site Explorer. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand transparently lists out many of the biggest complaints we’ve heard about OSE over the years and explains the vast improvements Link Explorer provides, from DA scores updated daily to historic link data to a huge index of almost five trillion URLs.

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!


Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week I’m very excited to say that Moz’s Open Site Explorer product, which had a lot of challenges with it, is finally being retired, and we have a new product, Link Explorer, that’s taking its place. So let me walk you through why and how Moz’s link data for the last few years has really kind of sucked. There’s no two ways about it.

If you heard me here on Whiteboard Friday, if you watched me at conferences, if you saw me blogging, you’d probably see me saying, “Hey, I personally use Ahrefs, or I use Majestic for my link research.” Moz has a lot of other good tools. The crawler is excellent. Moz Pro is good. But Open Site Explorer was really lagging, and today, that’s not the case. Let me walk you through this.

The big complaints about OSE/Mozscape

1. The index was just too small

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

Mozscape was probably about a fifth to a tenth the size of its competitors. While it got a lot of the quality good links of the web, it just didn’t get enough. As SEOs, we need to know all of the links, the good ones and the bad ones.

2. The data was just too old

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

So, in Mozscape, a link that you built on November 1st, you got a link added to a website, you’re very proud of yourself. That’s excellent. You should expect that a link tool should pick that up within maybe a couple weeks, maybe three weeks at the outside. Google is probably picking it up within just a few days, sometimes hours.

Yet, when Mozscape would crawl that, it would often be a month or more later, and by the time Mozscape processed its index, it could be another 40 days after that, meaning that you could see a 60- to 80-day delay, sometimes even longer, between when your link was built and when Mozscape actually found it. That sucks.

3. PA/DA scores took forever to update

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

PA/DA scores, likewise, took forever to update because of this link problem. So the index would say, oh, your DA is over here. You’re at 25, and now maybe you’re at 30. But in reality, you’re probably far ahead of that, because you’ve been building a lot of links that Mozscape just hasn’t picked up yet. So this is this lagging indicator. Sometimes there would be links that it just didn’t even know about. So PA and DA just wouldn’t be as accurate or precise as you’d want them to be.

4. Some scores were really confusing and out of date

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

MozRank and MozTrust relied on essentially the original Google PageRank paper from 1997, which there’s no way that’s what’s being used today. Google certainly uses some view of link equity that’s passed between links that is similar to PageRank, and I think they probably internally call that PageRank, but it looks nothing like what MozRank was called.

Likewise, MozTrust, way out of date, from a paper in I think 2002 or 2003. Much more advancements in search have happened since then.

Spam score was also out of date. It used a system that was correlated with what spam looked like three, four years ago, so much more up to date than these two, but really not nearly as sophisticated as what Google is doing today. So we needed to toss those out and find their replacements as well.

5. There was no way to see links gained and lost over time

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

Mozscape had no way to see gained and lost links over time, and folks thought, “Gosh, these other tools in the SEO space give me this ability to show me links that their index has discovered or links they’ve seen that we’ve lost. I really want that.”

6. DA didn’t correlate as well as it should have

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

So over time, DA became a less and less indicative measure of how well you were performing in Google’s rankings. That needed to change as well. The new DA, by the way, much, much better on this front.

7. Bulk metrics checking and link reporting was too hard and manual

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

So folks would say, “Hey, I have this giant spreadsheet with all my link data. I want to upload that. I want you guys to crawl it. I want to go fetch all your metrics. I want to get DA scores for these hundreds or thousands of websites that I’ve got. How do I do that?” We didn’t provide a good way for you to do that either unless you were willing to write code and loop in our API.

8. People wanted distribution of their links by DA

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

They wanted distributions of their links by domain authority. Show me where my links come from, yes, but also what sorts of buckets of DA do I have versus my competition? That was also missing.

So, let me show you what the new Link Explorer has.

Moz's new Link Explorer

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Wow, look at that magical board change, and it only took a fraction of a second. Amazing.

What Link Explorer has done, as compared to the old Open Site Explorer, is pretty exciting. I’m actually very proud of the team. If you know me, you know I am a picky SOB. I usually don’t even like most of the stuff that we put out here, but oh my god, this is quite an incredible product.

1. Link Explorer has a GIANT index

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

So I mentioned index size was a big problem. Link Explorer has got a giant index. Frankly, it’s about 20 times larger than what Open Site Explorer had and, as you can see, very, very competitive with the other services out there. Majestic Fresh says they have about a trillion URLs from their I think it’s the last 60 days. Ahrefs, about 3 trillion. Majestic’s historic, which goes all time, has about 7 trillion, and Moz, just in the last 90 days, which I think is our index — maybe it’s a little shorter than that, 60 days — 4.7 trillion, so almost 5 trillion URLs. Just really, really big. It covers a huge swath of the web, which is great.

2. All data updates every 24 hours

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

So, unlike the old index, it is very fresh. Every time it finds a new link, it updates PA scores and DA scores. The whole interface can show you all the links that it found just yesterday every morning.

3. DA and PA are tracked daily for every site

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

You don’t have to track them yourself. You don’t have to put them into your campaigns. Every time you go and visit a domain, you will see this graph showing you domain authority over time, which has been awesome.

For my new company, I’ve been tracking all the links that come in to SparkToro, and I can see my DA rising. It’s really exciting. I put out a good blog post, I get a bunch of links, and my DA goes up the next day. How cool is that?

4. Old scores are gone, and new scores are polished and high quality

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

So we got rid of MozRank and MozTrust, which were very old metrics and, frankly, very few people were using them, and most folks who were using them didn’t really know how to use them. PA basically takes care of both of them. It includes the weight of links that come to you and the trustworthiness. So that makes more sense as a metric.

Spam score is now on a 0 to 100% risk model instead of the old 0 to 17 flags and the flags correlate to some percentage. So 0 to 100 risk model. Spam score is basically just a machine learning built model against sites that Google penalized or banned.

So we took a huge amount of domains. We ran their names through Google. If they couldn’t rank for their own name, we said they were penalized. If we did a site: the domain.com and Google had de-indexed them, we said they were banned. Then we built this risk model. So in the 90% that means 90% of sites that had these qualities were penalized or banned. 2% means only 2% did. If you have a 30% spam score, that’s not too bad. If you have a 75% spam score, it’s getting a little sketchy.

5. Discovered and lost links are available for every site, every day

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

So again, for this new startup that I’m doing, I’ve been watching as I get new links and I see where they come from, and then sometimes I’ll reach out on Twitter and say thank you to those folks who are linking to my blog posts and stuff. But it’s very, very cool to see links that I gain and links that I lose every single day. This is a feature that Ahrefs and Majestic have had for a long time, and frankly Moz was behind on this. So I’m very glad that we have it now.

6. DA is back as a high-quality leading indicator of ranking ability

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

So, a note that is important: everyone’s DA has changed. Your DA has changed. My DA has changed. Moz’s DA changed. Google’s DA changed. I think it went from a 98 to a 97. My advice is take a look at yourself versus all your competitors that you’re trying to rank against and use that to benchmark yourself. The old DA was an old model on old data on an old, tiny index. The new one is based on this 4.7 trillion size index. It is much bigger. It is much fresher. It is much more accurate. You can see that in the correlations.

7. Building link lists, tracking links that you want to acquire, and bulk metrics checking is now easy

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

Building link lists, tracking links that you want to acquire, and bulk metrics checking, which we never had before and, in fact, not a lot of the other tools have this link tracking ability, is now available through possibly my favorite feature in the tool called Link Tracking Lists. If you’ve used Keyword Explorer and you’ve set up your keywords to watch those over time and to build a keyword research set, very, very similar. If you have links you want to acquire, you add them to this list. If you have links that you want to check on, you add them to this list. It will give you all the metrics, and it will tell you: Does this link to your website that you can associate with a list, or does it not? Or does it link to some page on the domain, but maybe not exactly the page that you want? It will tell that too. Pretty cool.

8. Link distribution by DA

Moz's Link Data Used to Suck... But Not Anymore! The New Link Explorer is Here - Whiteboard Friday

Finally, we do now have link distribution by DA. You can find that right on the Overview page at the bottom.

Look, I’m not saying Link Explorer is the absolute perfect, best product out there, but it’s really, really damn good. I’m incredibly proud of the team. I’m very proud to have this product out there.

If you’d like, I’ll be writing some more about how we went about building this product and a bunch of agency folks that we spent time with to develop this, and I would like to thank all of them of course. A huge thank you to the Moz team.

I hope you’ll do me a favor. Check out Link Explorer. I think, very frankly, this team has earned 30 seconds of your time to go check it out.

Try out Link Explorer!

All right. Thanks, everyone. We’ll see you again for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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Moz’s Brand-New SEO Learning Center Has Landed!

Posted by rachelgooodmanmoore

CHAPTER 1: A New Hope

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, marketers who wanted to learn about SEO were forced to mine deep into the caverns of Google search engine result pages to find the answers to even the most simple SEO questions.

Then, out of darkness came a new hope (with a mouthful of a name):

giphy.gif

…the Learn SEO and Search Marketing hub!

The SEO and Search Marketing hub housed resources like the Beginner’s Guide to SEO and articles about popular SEO topics like meta descriptions, title tags, and robots.txt. Its purpose was to serve as a one-stop-shop for visitors looking to learn what SEO was all about and how to use it on their own sites.

The Learn SEO and Search marketing hub would go on to serve as a guiding light for searchers and site visitors looking to learn the ropes of SEO for many years to come.

CHAPTER 2: The Learning Hub Strikes Back

Since its inception in 2010, this hub happily served hundreds of thousands of Internet folk looking to learn the ropes of SEO and search marketing. But time took its toll on the hub. As marketing and search engine optimization grew increasingly complex, the Learning Hub lapsed into disrepair. While new content was periodically added, that content was hard to find and often intermingled with older, out-of-date resources. The Learning Hub became less of a hub and more of a list of resources… some of which were also lists of resources.

giphy.gif

Offshoots like the Local Learning Center and Content Marketing Learning Center sprung up in an effort to tame the overgrown learning hub, but ‘twas all for naught: By autumn of 2016, Moz’s learning hub sites were a confusing nest of hard-to-navigate articles, guides, and 404s. Some articles were written for SEO experts and explained concepts in extensive, technical detail, while others were written for an audience with less extensive SEO knowledge. It was impossible to know which type of article you found yourself in before you wound up confused or discouraged.

What had once been a useful resource for marketers of all backgrounds was languishing in its age.

CHAPTER 3: The Return of the Learning Center

The vision behind the SEO and Search Marketing Hub had always been to educate SEOs and search marketers on the skills they needed to be successful in their jobs. While the site section continued to serve that purpose, somewhere along the along the way we started getting diminishing returns.

Our mission, then, was clear: Re-invent Moz’s learning resources with a new structure, new website, and new content.

As we set off on this mission, one thing was clear: The new Learning Center should serve as a home base for marketers and SEOs of all skill levels to learn what’s needed to excel in their work: from the fundamentals to expert-level content, from time-tested tenets of SEO success to cutting-edge tactics and tricks. If we weren’t able to accomplish this, our mission would all be for naught.

We also believed that a new Learning Center should make it easy for visitors of all skill levels and learning styles to find value: from those folks who want to read an article then dive into their work; to those who want to browse through libraries of focused SEO videos; to folks who want to learn from the experts in hands-on webinars.

So, that’s exactly what we built.

May we introduce to you the (drumroll, please) brand new, totally rebuilt SEO Learning Center!

giphy.gif

Unlike the “list of lists” in the old Learn SEO and Search Marketing hub, the new Learning Center organizes content by topic.

Each topic has its own “topic hub.” There are eleven of these and they cover:

Each of the eleven topic hubs host a slew of hand-picked articles, videos, blog posts, webinars, Q&A posts, templates, and training classes designed to help you dive deeper into your chosen SEO topic.

All eleven of the hubs contain a “fundamentals” menu to help you wrap your brain around a topic, as well as a content feed with hundreds of resources to help you go even further. These feed resources are filterable by topic (for instance, content that’s about both ranking & visibility AND local SEO), SEO skill level (from beginner to advanced), and format.

Use the Learning Center’s filters to zero in on exactly the content you’re looking for.

And, if you’re brand new to a topic or not sure where to start, you can always find a link to the Beginner’s Guide to SEO right at the top of each page.

But we can only explain so much in words — check it out for yourself:

Visit the new SEO Learning Center!

CHAPTER 4: The Content Awakens

One of the main motivations behind rebuilding the Learning Center website was to make it easier for folks to find and move through a slew of educational content, be that a native Learning Center article, a blog post, a webinar, or otherwise. But it doesn’t do any good to make content easier to find if that content is totally out-of-date and unhelpful.

giphy.gif

In addition to our mission to build a new Learning Center, we’ve also been quietly updating our existing articles to include the latest best practices, tactics, strategies, and resources. As part of this rewrite, we’ve also made an effort to keep each article as focused as possible around specifically one topic — a complete explanation of everything someone newer to the world of SEO needs to know about the given topic. What did that process look like in action? Check it out:

As of now we’ve updated 50+ articles, with more on the way!

Going forward, we’ll continue to iterate on the search experience within the new Learning Center. For example, while we always have our site search bar available, a Learning Center-specific search function would make finding articles even easier — and that’s just one of our plans for the future. Bigger projects include a complete update of the Beginner’s Guide to SEO (keep an eye on the blog for more news there, too), as well as our other introductory guides.

Help us, Moz-i Wan Community, you’re our only hope

We’ve already telekinetically moved mountains with this project, but the Learning Center is your resource — we’d love to hear what you’d like to see next, or if there’s anything really important you think we’ve missed. Head over, check it out, and tell us what you think in the comments!

Explore the new SEO Learning Center!

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Spam Score: Moz’s New Metric to Measure Penalization Risk

Posted by randfish

Today, I’m very excited to announce that Moz’s Spam Score, an R&D project we’ve worked on for nearly a year, is finally going live. In this post, you can learn more about how we’re calculating spam score, what it means, and how you can potentially use it in your SEO work.

How does Spam Score work?

Over the last year, our data science team, led by 
Dr. Matt Peters, examined a great number of potential factors that predicted that a site might be penalized or banned by Google. We found strong correlations with 17 unique factors we call “spam flags,” and turned them into a score.

Almost every subdomain in 
Mozscape (our web index) now has a Spam Score attached to it, and this score is viewable inside Open Site Explorer (and soon, the MozBar and other tools). The score is simple; it just records the quantity of spam flags the subdomain triggers. Our correlations showed that no particular flag was more likely than others to mean a domain was penalized/banned in Google, but firing many flags had a very strong correlation (you can see the math below).

Spam Score currently operates only on the subdomain level—we don’t have it for pages or root domains. It’s been my experience and the experience of many other SEOs in the field that a great deal of link spam is tied to the subdomain-level. There are plenty of exceptions—manipulative links can and do live on plenty of high-quality sites—but as we’ve tested, we found that subdomain-level Spam Score was the best solution we could create at web scale. It does a solid job with the most obvious, nastiest spam, and a decent job highlighting risk in other areas, too.

How to access Spam Score

Right now, you can find Spam Score inside 
Open Site Explorer, both in the top metrics (just below domain/page authority) and in its own tab labeled “Spam Analysis.” Spam Score is only available for Pro subscribers right now, though in the future, we may make the score in the metrics section available to everyone (if you’re not a subscriber, you can check it out with a free trial). 

The current Spam Analysis page includes a list of subdomains or pages linking to your site. You can toggle the target to look at all links to a given subdomain on your site, given pages, or the entire root domain. You can further toggle source tier to look at the Spam Score for incoming linking pages or subdomains (but in the case of pages, we’re still showing the Spam Score for the subdomain on which that page is hosted).

You can click on any Spam Score row and see the details about which flags were triggered. We’ll bring you to a page like this:

Back on the original Spam Analysis page, at the very bottom of the rows, you’ll find an option to export a disavow file, which is compatible with Google Webmaster Tools. You can choose to filter the file to contain only those sites with a given spam flag count or higher:

Disavow exports usually take less than 3 hours to finish. We can send you an email when it’s ready, too.

WARNING: Please do not export this file and simply upload it to Google! You can really, really hurt your site’s ranking and there may be no way to recover. Instead, carefully sort through the links therein and make sure you really do want to disavow what’s in there. You can easily remove/edit the file to take out links you feel are not spam. When Moz’s Cyrus Shepard disavowed every link to his own site, it took more than a year for his rankings to return!

We’ve actually made the file not-wholly-ready for upload to Google in order to be sure folks aren’t too cavalier with this particular step. You’ll need to open it up and make some edits (specifically to lines at the top of the file) in order to ready it for Webmaster Tools

In the near future, we hope to have Spam Score in the Mozbar as well, which might look like this: 

Sweet, right? :-)

Potential use cases for Spam Analysis

This list probably isn’t exhaustive, but these are a few of the ways we’ve been playing around with the data:

  1. Checking for spammy links to your own site: Almost every site has at least a few bad links pointing to it, but it’s been hard to know how much or how many potentially harmful links you might have until now. Run a quick spam analysis and see if there’s enough there to cause concern.
  2. Evaluating potential links: This is a big one where we think Spam Score can be helpful. It’s not going to catch every potentially bad link, and you should certainly still use your brain for evaluation too, but as you’re scanning a list of link opportunities or surfing to various sites, having the ability to see if they fire a lot of flags is a great warning sign.
  3. Link cleanup: Link cleanup projects can be messy, involved, precarious, and massively tedious. Spam Score might not catch everything, but sorting links by it can be hugely helpful in identifying potentially nasty stuff, and filtering out the more probably clean links.
  4. Disavow Files: Again, because Spam Score won’t perfectly catch everything, you will likely need to do some additional work here (especially if the site you’re working on has done some link buying on more generally trustworthy domains), but it can save you a heap of time evaluating and listing the worst and most obvious junk.

Over time, we’re also excited about using Spam Score to help improve the PA and DA calculations (it’s not currently in there), as well as adding it to other tools and data sources. We’d love your feedback and insight about where you’d most want to see Spam Score get involved.

Details about Spam Score’s calculation

This section comes courtesy of Moz’s head of data science, Dr. Matt Peters, who created the metric and deserves (at least in my humble opinion) a big round of applause. – Rand

Definition of “spam”

Before diving into the details of the individual spam flags and their calculation, it’s important to first describe our data gathering process and “spam” definition.

For our purposes, we followed Google’s definition of spam and gathered labels for a large number of sites as follows.

  • First, we randomly selected a large number of subdomains from the Mozscape index stratified by mozRank.
  • Then we crawled the subdomains and threw out any that didn’t return a “200 OK” (redirects, errors, etc).
  • Finally, we collected the top 10 de-personalized, geo-agnostic Google-US search results using the full subdomain name as the keyword and checked whether any of those results matched the original keyword. If they did not, we called the subdomain “spam,” otherwise we called it “ham.”

We performed the most recent data collection in November 2014 (after the Penguin 3.0 update) for about 500,000 subdomains.

Relationship between number of flags and spam

The overall Spam Score is currently an aggregate of 17 different “flags.” You can think of each flag a potential “warning sign” that signals that a site may be spammy. The overall likelihood of spam increases as a site accumulates more and more flags, so that the total number of flags is a strong predictor of spam. Accordingly, the flags are designed to be used together—no single flag, or even a few flags, is cause for concern (and indeed most sites will trigger at least a few flags).

The following table shows the relationship between the number of flags and percent of sites with those flags that we found Google had penalized or banned:

ABOVE: The overall probability of spam vs. the number of spam flags. Data collected in Nov. 2014 for approximately 500K subdomains. The table also highlights the three overall danger levels: low/green (< 10%) moderate/yellow (10-50%) and high/red (>50%)

The overall spam percent averaged across a large number of sites increases in lock step with the number of flags; however there are outliers in every category. For example, there are a small number of sites with very few flags that are tagged as spam by Google and conversely a small number of sites with many flags that are not spam.

Spam flag details

The individual spam flags capture a wide range of spam signals link profiles, anchor text, on page signals and properties of the domain name. At a high level the process to determine the spam flags for each subdomain is:

  • Collect link metrics from Mozscape (mozRank, mozTrust, number of linking domains, etc).
  • Collect anchor text metrics from Mozscape (top anchor text phrases sorted by number of links)
  • Collect the top five pages by Page Authority on the subdomain from Mozscape
  • Crawl the top five pages plus the home page and process to extract on page signals
  • Provide the output for Mozscape to include in the next index release cycle

Since the spam flags are incorporated into in the Mozscape index, fresh data is released with each new index. Right now, we crawl and process the spam flags for each subdomains every two – three months although this may change in the future.

Link flags

The following table lists the link and anchor text related flags with the the odds ratio for each flag. For each flag, we can compute two percents: the percent of sites with that flag that are penalized by Google and the percent of sites with that flag that were not penalized. The odds ratio is the ratio of these percents and gives the increase in likelihood that a site is spam if it has the flag. For example, the first row says that a site with this flag is 12.4 times more likely to be spam than one without the flag.

ABOVE: Description and odds ratio of link and anchor text related spam flags. In addition to a description, it lists the odds ratio for each flag which gives the overall increase in spam likelihood if the flag is present).

Working down the table, the flags are:

  • Low mozTrust to mozRank ratio: Sites with low mozTrust compared to mozRank are likely to be spam.
  • Large site with few links: Large sites with many pages tend to also have many links and large sites without a corresponding large number of links are likely to be spam.
  • Site link diversity is low: If a large percentage of links to a site are from a few domains it is likely to be spam.
  • Ratio of followed to nofollowed subdomains/domains (two separate flags): Sites with a large number of followed links relative to nofollowed are likely to be spam.
  • Small proportion of branded links (anchor text): Organically occurring links tend to contain a disproportionate amount of banded keywords. If a site does not have a lot of branded anchor text, it’s a signal the links are not organic.

On-page flags

Similar to the link flags, the following table lists the on page and domain name related flags:

ABOVE: Description and odds ratio of on page and domain name related spam flags. In addition to a description, it lists the odds ratio for each flag which gives the overall increase in spam likelihood if the flag is present).

  • Thin content: If a site has a relatively small ratio of content to navigation chrome it’s likely to be spam.
  • Site mark-up is abnormally small: Non-spam sites tend to invest in rich user experiences with CSS, Javascript and extensive mark-up. Accordingly, a large ratio of text to mark-up is a spam signal.
  • Large number of external links: A site with a large number of external links may look spammy.
  • Low number of internal links: Real sites tend to link heavily to themselves via internal navigation and a relative lack of internal links is a spam signal.
  • Anchor text-heavy page: Sites with a lot of anchor text are more likely to be spam then those with more content and less links.
  • External links in navigation: Spam sites may hide external links in the sidebar or footer.
  • No contact info: Real sites prominently display their social and other contact information.
  • Low number of pages found: A site with only one or a few pages is more likely to be spam than one with many pages.
  • TLD correlated with spam domains: Certain TLDs are more spammy than others (e.g. pw).
  • Domain name length: A long subdomain name like “bycheapviagra.freeshipping.onlinepharmacy.com” may indicate keyword stuffing.
  • Domain name contains numerals: domain names with numerals may be automatically generated and therefore spam.

If you’d like some more details on the technical aspects of the spam score, check out the 
video of Matt’s 2012 MozCon talk about Algorithmic Spam Detection or the slides (many of the details have evolved, but the overall ideas are the same):

We’d love your feedback

As with all metrics, Spam Score won’t be perfect. We’d love to hear your feedback and ideas for improving the score as well as what you’d like to see from it’s in-product application in the future. Feel free to leave comments on this post, or to email Matt (matt at moz dot com) and me (rand at moz dot com) privately with any suggestions.

Good luck cleaning up and preventing link spam!



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The Not-so-Short Shortlist of Moz’s Top Seattle Restaurants, Bars, and Activities for MozCon 2013

Posted by Elizabeth_Crouch

The benefits of attending MozCon 2013 are invaluable: You’ll go home with insightful tips from top marketers, actionable advice from data experts, connections to awesome people in your industry, new friends from the Moz Community, freshly honed inbound marketing skills—and your very own Roger toy. One of the biggest bonuses? It’s a fantastic excuse to visit Seattle during the most beautiful time of year.

I polled the whole MozPlex to curate a list of our favorite places to dine, swill coffee, imbibe boozy beverages, play games, bust a move, hit the water, and take in the view. There are over 130 Mozzers now, so the list is long. From locally grown, organic eats and family fun on Lake Union to bocce ball and craft beer, Seattle’s got a little something for everyone.


The Hipster • The Sophisticated Palate • The Sandwich Lover • The Coffee Fiend

The Beer Snob • The Cocktail Connoisseur • The Adventurer

The Hipster

Community Coordinator Megan drinks out of an ironic cup.

Recognizable by their tight jeans and plaid coloring, these gentle creatures can generally be found grazing the hill east of downtown. They might be slow to accept you into the herd, but once you’re in, they’ll share their abundant resources with you.

People’s Choice: The Mozzers’ top spot (and terminus to many a Wednesday beer night) is the Unicorn and its basement bar, the Narwhal (1118 East Pike Street). A kaleidoscope of circus décor, deep fried eats, and loud music, these bars are where Capitol Hill layabouts and techies alike unite in pursuit of good times and reasonably priced beverages.

The Seattle Institution: Grab a cold beer, tuck into a plate of nachos, and soak up some sun on the back patio at Linda’s Tavern (707 East Pine Street). The original Seattle hipster bar, this place is best approached with a pack of pals to keep you company and help you drink beer or mimosas by the pitcher.

Break out the Chopsticks: Sleek, modern, and serene, Momiji (1522 12th Avenue) is where most Mozzers prefer to sup on sushi. You can’t beat happy hour in the front bar—cheap Sapporo, sake, and decadently crunchy deep-fried Seattle rolls—but the back dining room is truly beautiful. If fish doesn’t strike your fancy, roll down the hill a little bit to In The Bowl (1554 East Olive Way) for the tastiest vegetarian Thai on the Hill. The dining room: small. The menu: epic. The bathroom: magical (just trust me here). Their four-star spiciness level will scald even the most fireproof of tongues, and their noodles will transport you to a different plane of happiness.

Al Fresco: With hipster cred and a patio to rival Linda’s, Captain Black’s (129 Belmont Avenue East) is another crowd favorite here at Moz. After you’re done stuffing yourself with fried Beecher’s cheese curds, hush puppies, and tater tots, you can drink a little whiskey, then roll back down Capitol Hill to your hotel.

Sate the Sweet Tooth: While die-hard Seattle hipsters may head to a lesser-known creamery on Capitol Hill (that also happens to be the best dessert spot for beer lovers, so read on), Moz recommends you join the line at Molly Moon’s (917 East Pine Street) for scoops of Fair Trade chocolate, salted caramel, or balsamic strawberry ice cream. Snag a waffle cone and chill on the astroturf at Volunteer Park (1247 15th Avenue East), the coolest place to be on a hot, sunny day.

Take in the View: Sure, you could wait in line at the Space Needle or climb to the top of Mount Rainier. But the Smith Tower (506 2nd Avenue) in Pioneer Square has been providing Seattleites with breathtaking views since before skyscrapers were even cool.

Fun and Games: Roll a few blocks north of Moz on Second Avenue to hit three of our favorite post-work stops: Rabbit Hole (2222 2nd Avenue) for skee-ball, highbrow cocktails, and outrageously good pub grub; Shorty’s (2222 2nd Avenue) for cheap PBR, video games, and pinball; and Lava Lounge (2226 2nd Avenue) for whiskey, booths big enough for a whole crew, and many rounds of shuffleboard.

Bust a Move: If you’re heading in on Sunday, hit up the Re-Bar (1114 Howell Street) for their FLAMMABLE! dance night. “A gay bar, only for everybody,” the Re-Bar mixes the hippest of the hip and the funnest of the fun in a LGBTQ-friendly atmosphere with stiff drinks and a packed dance floor. Heads up: cash only!

Weekend Adventure: If you’re staying the prior weekend and have a car handy, hit up Georgetown, a South Seattle neighborhood with plenty of art galleries, dive bars, tasty restaurants, and a cool trailer park flea market (5805 Airport Way) on the weekends.

The Sophisticated Palate

Engineers Martin and Doug give a toast to good taste.

Do you love the finer things in life? We do, too. We want our food stuffed with other, more obscure food and glazed in priceless ingredients. We want chefs who minored in alchemy at culinary school. We want nothing less than sheer artistry. These are some of Moz’s top picks for exquisite eats paired with beautifully crafted cocktails and Washington’s best wines. So comb your hair, put on your fanciest pair of sneakers, and hit the spots on this list.

People’s Choice: Restaurant Zoe (1318 East Union) is part of the bustling restaurant scene around 12th and Union. Staffed by a kitchen full of vets from Canlis, Crush, and other Seattle standards, Zoe boasts an effortlessly cool atmosphere, and an approachable menu of artistic Pacific Northwest fare. Two blocks away, Cascina Spinasse (1535 14th Avenue) dishes up the most decadently delicious Northern Italian eats you can find outside of Piemonte—leg of rabbit, tajarin pasta glued together with butter and sage, precious lettuces dressed with Barolo vinegar and Ligurian olive oil. If you’re in the mood for slightly lighter fare, hit their side bar, Artusi (1531 14th Avenue), for ingenius cocktails (including a slushy machine full of rotating frozen craft cocktails that will most certainly change your life) and a compact menu of mind-blowingly good food. 

The Seattle Institution: An overwhelming number of Mozzers cited one of prolific restaurateur Ethan Stowell’s restaurants as their personal favorites, so I’m going to just lump them all together. If you’re sticking downtown, go for vino, fluffy gnocchi alla romagna, and perfectly al dente pasta at Tavolata (2323 2nd Avenue). If we’ve already convinced you that Capitol Hill is the place to be, head to Rione XIII (401 15th Avenue East) for Roman-style pizza and pasta, Anchovies & Olives (1550 15th Avenue) for ice-cold oysters and beautifully prepared seafood, or Bar Cotto (1546 15th Avenue) for mouth-watering charcuterie, veggies, and thin, crispy pizzas. Feeling adventurous? The tasting menu at Staple & Fancy (4739 Ballard Avenue Northwest) in Ballard is also worth the extra trip. 

Pro tip: Arrive in luxurious style with our friends from Uber—it’s either less expensive than or about the same price as taking a cab, depending on what kind of ride you fancy. MozCon attendees will also get hooked up with a little friends-of-friends discount!

Break out the Chopsticks: Round up at least two or three people to hit Monsoon (615 19th Avenue East) with you, because you will probably want to order every single thing on this exquisite Vietnamese-influenced menu. Especially the drunken chicken.

Al Fresco: What happens when two classically trained chefs fall in love, get married, and wed Korean cuisine with French technique and Northwest ingredients? Pure magic. One of the best meals of your life. Dumplings that will restore your faith in humanity. Hitch a ride to Fremont and try to snag a seat on the back deck at Revel (403 N 36th Street).

Sate the Sweet Tooth: What’s that overpowering cocoa-brownie smell wafting toward you on the deck at Revel? It’s Seattle’s premier chocolate factory, organic and Fair Trade Theo (3400 Phinney Avenue North). Take a tour, and bring home chocolatey souvenirs for your loved ones—or yourself. We won’t tell. If you take our other recommendations and end up on Capitol Hill for dinner, head to D’Ambrosio Gelato (1544 12th Avenue) for creamy, authentic Italian goodness from a certified Master Gelatiere.

Worth the Trip: Another Ballard stand-out, The Walrus and the Carpenter (4743 Ballard Avenue Northwest) shares a dining room window with the aforementioned Staple & Fancy. Go here for the freshest oysters, the most delectable menu, the most gorgeous kitchen, and the mustache-iest waitstaff north of the Shipping Canal.

Weekend Adventure: We highly recommend that you pay a visit to Woodinville for wine tasting. Much closer than the sun-drenched growing regions in Central Washington, Woodinville’s tasting rooms bring some of the best wines within quick driving distance of the big city. A few of Moz’s favorites: Mark Ryan (14475 Woodinville-Redmond Road, Woodinville, WA 98072), DeLille (14421 Woodinville-Redmond Road Northeast, Woodinville, WA 98072), Obelisco (19495 144th Avenue Northeast Woodinville, WA 98072), and Long Shadows (14450 Woodinville-Redmond Road, #105, Woodinville, WA 98072).

The Sandwich Lover

Customer Acquisition Manager Justin enjoys a Paseo sandwich and the gorgeous view from Gasworks Park.

If the Earl of Sandwich is your most cherished historical figure; if you daydream about what other letters you could add to your BLT; if you literally think there hasn’t been a better thing since sliced bread—this list is for you, my friend.

People’s Choice: The people have spoken, and they have chosen Paseo (4225 Fremont Avenue North and 6226 Seaview Avenue Northwest). These are, empirically, the best sandwiches in Seattle. They might be the best sandwiches anywhere, ever. Crispy baguette. Savory aioli. Tangy jalapeños. Grilled onions simmered in the same addictive sauce they use to marinate their meats. Crisp romaine lettuce. Cuban-style pork, chicken, tofu, or seafood. You might just decide to dump out your suitcase and refill it with Paseo sandwiches to take home. That might be a bad decision. Might.

Nice Buns: Lil Woody’s (1211 Pine Street) is just a few blocks up the hill from the Convention Center. Their burgers come piled with exotic ingredients and paired with hand-cut fries and milkshakes made from Molly Moon’s ice cream.

The Seattle Institution: Don’t let the divey décor and weird name fool you—The Honey Hole (703 East Pike Street) on Capitol Hill makes some seriously delicious sandwiches, served up with zero pretention and a side of the crispiest fries you will ever eat.

Sate the Sweet Tooth: In addition to their eponymous treats and sweet scoops, Cupcake Royale also boasts a freezer full of ice cream sammies in flavors like red velvet cake and burnt caramel with sea salt. There are a few locations, but we’re partial to the one across the street from Moz (108 Pine Street). You can admire our Post-it window murals from street level or pop in to say hi!

Fun and Games: Like a little nosh with your board or card games? Cafe Mox (5105 Leary Avenue Northwest) in Ballard is a sweet spot to grab a beer, eat a sandwich, and play some Settlers of Catan. Bonus: family-friendly!

The Coffee Fiend

Director of Community Jen savors a steamy latte.

It’s no myth: Seattleites subsist on a steady diet of vitamin D pills, inky espresso, and velvety lattes. Here are some our favorite places to fuel up.

Downtown: Home to many a Moz 1:1 meeting, Fonté Café and Wine Bar (1321 1st Avenue) is a lovely place to grab perfectly brewed coffee and tame your inbox first thing in the morning. Is WFCS a thing where you live? We hope that it is.

Capitol Hill: Espresso Vivace is arguably the best coffee in Seattle. But we don’t like arguments, so you should probably roll up the hill to Vivace’s open-air sidewalk bar (321 Broadway Avenue East) or brick-and-mortar café (532 Broadway Avenue East) to find out for yourself.

Pioneer Square: If you find yourself in Seattle’s oldest neighborhood, head to art-filled Zeitgeist Coffee (171 South Jackson Street) before you embark on the Seattle Underground Tour (608 1st Avenue). Not your typical tour, this fun crawl through the buried former ground-level of Old Seattle is a Moz favorite. You’ll learn all about lusty prospectors and the women that fleeced them, Seattle’s original wooden plumbing pipes, and how old-timey architects beat the mud by building streets ten feet in the air.

Beyond: Lighthouse Roasters (400 North 43rd Street) in Fremont is off the beaten path, but roasts such perfect coffee, you won’t mind the hike through this residential neighborhood—a great stop on your way to Woodland Park Zoo (601 North 59th Street).

The Beer Snob

Ruby Programmer Ben appreciates the subtle hoppy notes of an IPA.

Here in Seattle, one does not simply crack open a cold one and call it a night. One sips from the cornucopia of locally brewed IPAs, pilsners, saisons, and stouts. One tours breweries to compare and contrast their offerings. In some cases, one even brings the kids.

Gotta Taste Them All: If you only make one dedicated beer stop, let it be at Brouwer’s Cafe (400 North 35th Street) in Fremont. With 64 beers on tap, over 300 bottles, and 60 scotches, even the most jaded, world-weary connoisseur will find something new to sip on.

Fun for the Whole Family: Think beer and babies don’t mix? Kid-friendly Fremont Brewing Company (3409 Woodland Park Ave North) will prove you wrong. Parents can kick back and have adult conversations while the little ones dig into never-ending bowls of pretzels and play with their contemporaries. 

Sate the Sweet Tooth: The truly indie creamery on Capitol Hill, Bluebird (1205 East Pike Street) also brews some mighty fine beer. Home to the best vegan “ice cream” ever—a deceptively creamy horchata flavor—they also make beer floats with their stout. Frosty stout plus peanut butter ice cream equals mind, blown.

Fun and Games: Von Trapp’s (912 12th Avenue) cavernous biergarten on Capitol Hill is basically a playground for grown-ups. Go for the epic German and Belgian beer list, indulge in some tasty pretzels and brats, and stay for many rounds of bocce ball.

The Tastiest Kind of Tourism: Ballard is home to some of our favorite breweries, all located within walking distance of the neighborhood’s lively shopping and dining corridor. We recommend checking out Hilliard’s Beer (1550 Northwest 49th Street) and Peddler Brewing Company (1514 Northwest Leary Way). If you don’t mind mixing drinks with actual peddling, you can also hop aboard the Cycle Saloon (206-678-7211), a people-powered tour of Ballard’s breweries.

The Cocktail Connoisseur

Help Desk Administrator Dave and Customer Success Strategist Renea sip martinis at The Zig Zag.

Can you blind-smell the difference between Scrappy’s and Regan’s orange bitters? Does seeing a bottle of Pappy van Winkle on a shelf make you absurdly happy? Do you get sad when people say they don’t like gin? Cheers! These bars are for you.

The Seattle Institution: The Zig Zag Café (1501 Western Avenue #202) was one of the pioneering bars in the American craft cocktail movement. Nestled alongside the Pike Street Hill Climb between Pike Place Market and the waterfront, this dimly lit cocktail joint is the go-to spot for booze aficionados in Seattle. Their house cocktail list is inventive and extensive, their selection is carefully curated, and the ‘tenders are some of the best in the biz.

The New Darling: Looking to try something rare and extraordinary? The Captain’s List of spirits at Canon (928 12th Avenue) is so extensive that you need to scan a QR code to download it to your phone (which makes our nerd-hearts fill with glee). Beyond the floor-to-ceiling walls of precious booze, Canon wins us over with the little touches: stainless steel straws, slate coasters, cucumber-infused water, and copper mint julep cups.

The Hidden Gem: Tucked away in an alley between First and Second Avenues, Bathtub Gin & Co. (between Bell & Blanchard in “Gin Alley”) staffs bartenders who are gifted with a sixth sense: Tell them what kind of spirit you like and what kind of mood you’re in, and they’ll make you something mind-blowing. If you can snag a seat at the upstairs bar, do it. If not, settle in on a leather couch in the library room downstairs.

The Grand Tour: Touring the city’s distilleries is a fun way to sip local spirits and see Seattle while you’re at it. If you don’t have time for a full tour, head up to Sun Liquor Distillery (514 East Pike Street) and Oola Distillery (1314 East Union Street) on Capitol Hill. If you’ve got a bit more time, we recommend taking Local Craft Tours’ (206-455-3740) chauffeured trip around town. You’ll leave from downtown, then hit three or four distilleries (including some of our very favorites, Sound Spirits and Letterpress Distilling) to sample the wares.

The Adventurer

Social Community Manager Erica hits the high seas.

Are you coming to see the sights, absorb some art, and explore the area? After you’re finished eating and drinking like a local, here are the the museums, vistas, and activities we love to share with out-of-town guests.

Hit the Water: Looking for the best views of downtown? Get on a boat. Taking the West Seattle Water Taxi (Pier 50, 801 Alaskan Way) or the Bainbridge Island Ferry (Pier 52, 801 Alaskan Way) will give you glittering city views, and you can explore the walking paths, restaurants, and more on the opposite shores. If you’ve got a little more free time, Moz recommends renting kayaks from Moss Bay (1001 Fairview Avenue North, #1900) or canoes from the University of Washington Waterfront Activities Center (3701 Montlake Boulevard Northeast). Don’t forget to pack your flippy-floppies.

Drop the Mic: Seattle’s karaoke scene runs the gamut from modern and glitzy to gloriously divey. Our top picks are Rock Box (1603 Nagle Place) for their communal main room and swanky private rooms and Bush Garden (614 Maynard Avenue South) for their cheap drinks, campy backdrop videos, and awesome emcees.

Do the Tourist Thing: There’s nothing on earth like a genuine, bona fide, electrified, six-car monorail. The Seattle Monorail (in Westlake Center at 5th Avenue and Pine Street) is just a quick walk from the Convention Center. A relic of bygone times, this old beauty will deposit you directly at the Seattle Center (305 Harrison Street), where you can play around at the Pacific Science Center (200 2nd Avenue North) and check out some celebrated Northwest art glass at Chihuly Garden and Glass (305 Harrison Street). You can also go up in the Space Needle, if you reeeeeeally want to.

Get Your Culture Fix: Modern art and gorgeous views go hand in hand at the SAM Olympic Sculpture Park (2901 Western Avenue). Stroll the length of the waterfront to visit this picturesque outdoor museum, grab a bench, watch the sun sink behind the Olympic Mountains and the Puget Sound, and reflect upon what an awesome time you had at MozCon.


I hope this exhaustive list has gotten you pumped for MozCon! (With this many recommendations to try, you can even start planning your MozCon 2014 and 2015 agendas.) Haven’t secured your ticket yet? Get on it!

Hope to see you in Seattle in July. Feel free to reach out in the comments with any questions, or if you’d like any custom recommendations!

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