Tag Archive | "Michael"

Michael Dell Predicts in 10 Years More Computed Data on the Edge Than Cloud

“The surprise outcome ten years from now is there’ll be something much bigger than the private cloud and the public cloud,” says Dell Technologies CEO Michael Dell. “It’s the edge. I actually think there will be way more computed data on the edge in ten years than any of the derivatives of cloud that we want to talk about. That’s the ten-year prediction.”

Michael Dell, Chairman and CEO of Dell Technologies, discusses how it has become a critical technology platform for its customers in an interview with theCUBE at Dell Technology World 2019 in Las Vegas:

Data Has Always Been at the Center of How the Technology Industry Works

We feel great. Our business has really grown tremendously. All the things we’ve been doing have been resonating with customers. We’ve been able to restore the origins of the entrepreneurial dream and success of the company and reintroduce innovation and risk-taking into a now $ 91 billion company growing at double digits last year. Certainly, the set of capabilities that we’ve been able to build organically and inorganically, with the set of alliances we have, the trust that customers have given us, we are super happy about the position that we’re in and the opportunities going forward. I think all this is really just a pregame show to what’s ahead for our industry and for the role that technology is going to play in the world.

Data has always been at the center of how the technology industry works. Now we just have a tsunami, an explosion of data. Of course, now we have this new computer science that allows us to reason over the data in real time and create much better results and outcomes. That combined with the computing power all organizations have to reimagine themselves given all these technologies. Certainly, the infrastructure requirements in terms of the network, the storage, that compute, the build-out on the edge, tons of new requirements, we’re super well-positioned to go address all that.

Predicts in 10 Years More Computed Data on the Edge Than Cloud

The surprise outcome ten years from now is there’ll be something much bigger than the private cloud and the public cloud. It’s the edge. I actually think there will be way more computed data on the edge in ten years than any of the derivatives of cloud that we want to talk about. That’s the ten-year prediction. That’s what I see. Maybe nobody’s predicting that just yet, but let’s come back in ten years and see what it looks like.

Really what we’re doing is we’re bringing to customers all the resources they need to operate in the hybrid multi-cloud world. First, you have to recognize that the workloads want to move around. To say that they’re all going to be here or there is in some sense missing the point because they’re going to move back and forth. You’ve got regulation, cost, security, performance, latency, all sorts of new requirements that are coming at you and they’re not going to just sit in one place.

This is All Super Important As We Enter This AI Enabled Age

Now with the VMware cloud foundation, we have the ability to move these workloads seamlessly across now essentially all the public clouds. We have 4,200 partners out there, infrastructure on-premise built and tuned specifically for the VMware platform and empowered also for the edge. All of this together is the Dell Technologies cloud. We have obviously great capabilities from our Dell UMC infrastructure solutions and all the great innovations at VMware coming together.

Inside the business, the first priority was to get each of the individual pieces working well. But then we saw that the real opportunity was in the seams and how we could more deeply integrate all the aspects of what we’re doing together. You saw that on stage you know in vivid form yesterday with Pat and Jeff and Satya and even more today. Of course, there’s more to do. There’s always more to do. We’re working on how we build a data platform bringing together all of our capabilities with Boomi and Data Protection and VMware. This is all going to be super important as we enter this AI enabled age of the future.

We’ve Created an Incredible Business

I think investors are increasingly understanding that we’ve created an incredible business here. Certainly, if we look at the additional coverage that we have as they’re understanding the business, some of the analysts are starting to say hey this doesn’t really feel like a conglomerate. It’s a direct quote. If you think about what we demonstrated today and yesterday and will demonstrate in the future we’re not like Berkshire Hathaway. This is not a railroad that owns a chain of restaurants. This is one integrated business that fits together incredibly well and it’s generating substantial cash flows.

I think investors over time are figuring out the value that’s intrinsic to the overall Dell Technologies family. We’ve got lots of ways to invest, we got VMware, SecureWorks, Pivotal, and of course the overall Dell Technologies.

Michael Dell Predicts in 10 Years More Computed Data on the Edge Than Cloud

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Rainmaker Rewind: How Neuroscientist Michael Grybko Defines Writer’s Block, Part One

Rainmaker FM rewind

This week on Rainmaker Rewind, Kelton Reid welcomes back research scientist Michael Grybko, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington, to The Writer Files to unveil the mysteries of writer’s block from a scientific standpoint.

They also discuss why writers argue about the definition of writer’s block and how you can find your most productive writing time.

And, as always, be sure to check out the other great episodes that recently aired on Rainmaker FM.

  1. The Writer Files. Kelton Reid and Michael Grybko revisit the topic of writer’s block and what you can do to avoid it: How Neuroscientist Michael Grybko Defines Writer’s Block: Part One
  2. The Digital Entrepreneur. Jerod Morris welcomes entrepreneur and podcaster Jon Nastor to the show to discuss the importance of finding your passion: The Two Biggest Keys to Consistently Doing Work That Matters
  3. Copyblogger FM. Sonia Simone navigates the messy waters of including controversial content in your marketing campaigns: 5 Suggestions When You’re Writing About Controversy
  4. Confessions of a Pink-Haired Marketer. Sonia Simone explores goal setting and finding personal success: A Quick, Enjoyable Way to Sharpen your Vision, Goals, and Values
  5. Hack the Entrepreneur. Jon Nastor interviews Kevin Kelly about finding your voice in a crowded internet space: Looking Back on 35+ Years Working Project-to-Project, with Kevin Kelly
  6. The Missing Link. Sean Callahan of LinkedIn gives away his secrets to great writing and shares his thoughts on the best type of content to post on Pulse: LinkedIn’s Senior Manager of Content Marketing Tells All
  7. Youpreneur. Peter Shankman talks to Chris Ducker about his own personal brand journey, how he plans out his monetization strategy, and the one thing he won’t waver on when it comes to personal branding: The Personal Brand Building Journey According to Peter Shankman
  8. The Showrunner. Jerod Morris and Jon Nastor explore the balance between parenting and podcasting: What Being a Showrunner Can Teach Us About Parenting (and Vice Versa)

And, one more thing …

If you want to get Rainmaker Rewind sent straight to your favorite podcast player, subscribe right here on Rainmaker FM.

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How Neuroscientist Michael Grybko Defines Empathy

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Have you ever wondered why great writing creates an emotional response in readers? Welcome to another guest segment where The Writer Files host Kelton Reid picks the brain of a neuroscientist.

Research scientist Michael Grybko — of the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington — returned to the show to help Kelton define empathy from a scientific standpoint.

Mr. Grybko sheds some light into the darker corners of our understanding of how to tap into the hopes, dreams, and fears of your readers.

If you missed the first installment of The Writer’s Brain, you can find it here:

How Neuroscientist Michael Grybko Defines Creativity

In this file, host Kelton Reid and Michael Grybko discuss:

  • How science is changing our definition of empathy
  • Why pathos is a good jumping off place for writers
  • What actors and doctors have in common with writers
  • Are mirror systems the key to human empathy?
  • How to resist the dark side of empathy
  • The difference between good storytelling and great storytelling
  • Why writers need to crawl inside the heads of their audiences
  • How marketers tap into well-worn paths in our brains
  • The key to empathizing with your readers
  • Why great marketing starts with the desire to help people

Click Here to Listen to

The Writer Files on iTunes

Click Here to Listen on Rainmaker.FM

About the author

Rainmaker.FM

Rainmaker.FM is the premier digital marketing and sales podcast network. Get on-demand business advice from experts, whenever and wherever you want it.

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How Neuroscientist Michael Grybko Defines Creativity

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Have you ever wondered how prolific writers summon vast stores of creativity without seemingly breaking a sweat?

The Writer Files host, Kelton Reid, would like to introduce you to a guest segment where he enlists the help of a neuroscientist to give us a tour of The Writer’s Brain.

He has invited research scientist Michael Grybko — of the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington — to help him define creativity from a scientific standpoint.

He will help us pinpoint where exactly in the brain creative ideas come from, decide if you can teach an old writer new tricks, and test the theory that writers’ brains are similar to professional athletes.

In this 22-minute file, host Kelton Reid and Michael Grybko discuss:

  • How science is expanding our definition of creativity
  • Why memory plays such a big part in writing
  • Why you shouldn’t take your typing skills for granted
  • Where creative ideas come from
  • Can you teach an old writer new tricks?
  • Why staying curious is so important to creativity
  • Are prolific writers like pro athletes?
  • Why “write what you know” is good advice

Click Here to Listen to

The Writer Files on iTunes

Click Here to Listen on Rainmaker.FM

About the author

Rainmaker.FM

Rainmaker.FM is the premier digital marketing and sales podcast network. Get on-demand business advice from experts, whenever and wherever you want it.

The post How Neuroscientist Michael Grybko Defines Creativity appeared first on Copyblogger.


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Michael Hyatt on Building a Media Platform and Becoming a 10-Year Overnight Success

Michael Hyatt is the former Chairman and CEO of Thomas Nelson Publishers, the seventh largest trade book publishing company in the U.S. In fact, Hyatt has been involved in the traditional publishing business his entire working life.

Not the typical profile of a do-it-yourself blogger, right?

And yet, in 2012 when Thomas Nelson was acquired by HarperCollins and Michael left his executive role, it was his 8-year-old blog that opened the door to an exciting and vibrant new chapter of his life. A blog that he toiled over in frustrating obscurity for many of those foundational years.

It was the blog that provided the launch pad for his New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today bestselling book Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World. And it was the book that opened the door to his membership program Platform University. Seems like we can learn a few things from this guy about building our own online marketing and sales platforms.

In this 31-minute episode Michael Hyatt and I discuss:

  • His path from traditional publishing to independent media
  • The rough start as a blogger, and what skyrocketed his traffic
  • The dirty little secret of productivity
  • His realization about the power of online publishing
  • What you need in addition to world-class content
  • The critical importance of owning your digital platform
  • The compelling nature of audio vs. text content
  • The interesting way he produces his very popular podcast
  • Almost every author’s epic missed revenue opportunity

Click Here to Listen to Rainmaker FM Episode No. 21

Or, grab it in iTunes.

Image by Jonas Nilsson Lee

About the author

Brian Clark

Brian Clark is founder and CEO of Copyblogger, host of Rainmaker.FM, and evangelist for the Rainmaker Platform. Get more from Brian on Twitter.

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What Michael Phelps’ 19th Olympic Medal can Teach You About Smarter Online Marketing

image of Olympian Michael Phelps

If you were an Olympic-caliber swimmer, you could be forgiven for sort of hating Michael Phelps.

On Tuesday, he broke the record for holding more Olympic medals than any other athlete in history — 19 medals, of which 15 are gold.

During this summer Olympics, he’s been battling it out in a widely-publicized rivalry with his U.S. teammate Ryan Lochte.

Even a casual observer gets the impression that Lochte is, well, kind of sick of hearing about how great Michael Phelps is.

Lochte has been quoted over and over again saying, “This is my time.” And he did beat Phelps in the 400-meter medley, snatching the gold while Phelps didn’t even make the podium.

But when it was time for Phelps to grab that record-smashing 19th medal, he needed his rival’s help to do it.

Phelps won that 19th medal in the 4 x 200-meter freestyle relay — which means he needed the help of three other teammates, all working together toward a common goal.

When asked how he was able to beat Yannick Agnel, the brilliant (and scary fast) French swimmer in the lane next to him, he was quick to credit the nearly four-second lead given to him by his teammates.

Competition is great. Competitors keep us honest, keep us on our toes, and keep us improving. Without competition, we’d probably get pretty bored.

But competitors can also, at times, make the best allies.

Who else has the audience you want?

Wise online marketing begins with cultivating an audience — bringing together the collection of people who are interested in your topic and might be converted to customers.

The first letter of pretty much every copywriting or selling formula is “A” — for attention (or Audience, in this case). If you can’t get a crowd listening to what you’ve got to say, nothing else is going to work.

The most brilliantly written marketing can’t work if there’s no one there to read it — or if it’s sent to an audience who’s not tuned in to the subject.

You could simply buy traffic to build your audience, with pay-per-click or other forms of advertising. It’s been done before, and it will be done again.

But it’s expensive, and getting more so every day. It’s also tricky — whole books can be written (and have been) about how to manage the intricacies of Google AdWords.

When it works — and it doesn’t always work — advertising is a traffic faucet that can be turned on and off. If someone else (like Google) owns the faucet, and you have no other resources in place to grow your audience of prospects, they can turn that faucet off as easily as you can. And that puts you in a very dangerous position.

Power to the people

So if you don’t use advertising (or only use it for a portion of your traffic), how do you find your audience?

You find it by identifying individuals who have the audience you want, then cultivating relationships with them to better serve their audience … and grow yours while you’re at it.

People with major followings know that the audience comes first. If you can benefit their readers, viewers, or listeners, you’ve got a good shot at making an alliance.

That can mean guest blogging, formal joint venture partnerships, or just plain old-fashioned networking.

Even the most obnoxious online mavens and celebrities (and there are certainly a few of those) rely on allies to get the word out and keep it going.

21st-century business is rarely a zero-sum game

Have you ever met anyone who owns one diet book?

Most people either own zero diet books (they don’t worry about their weight, or they don’t turn to books for advice on it) or they own a shelf full of them.

An audience coming to you for a solution normally isn’t only coming to you.

As the information economy becomes a curated information economy, audiences like to hedge their bets. They’ll look for multiple experts, to reinforce their learning and make sure the advice they’re getting is sound.

There aren’t many “lone wolves” out there any more. Partnership and cross-pollination are the name of the game.

If you’re building your business on an audience attracted by your authority about a particular topic (which is what we think you should be doing), you want to spend most of your time working with, not against, the “competitors” for that audience.

But isn’t this just manipulation?

While it’s true that I am extremely evil, I’m not a fan of sucking up to someone you hate just to make a business connection.

In the first place, it does a disservice to your audience. If you have a legitimate disagreement with a competitor (especially if it’s a matter of ethics, rather than just style or approach), that person isn’t a good potential ally.

In the second place, sucking up to people you can’t stand will leach the soul out of everything you do and leave you disgusted with yourself. Which isn’t why you’re in business.

Friendly competitors like Phelps and Lochte don’t make a secret of their rivalry. They’re each respectfully out-front about their deeply held desire to win.

Respect and mutual goals allow rivals like these to work together when the situation calls for it.

Join us for the “Content Connections” series

This post is the kick-off for a series on making connections with other online publishers. We’ll talk about:

  • How to make high-quality connections with bloggers
  • Why traffic isn’t your first goal with guest blogging
  • How to use social media to strengthen connections with content producers
  • How to handle volatile, high-controversy topics
  • Where to find allies if your business is a zero-sum game

As well as lots of other tips, techniques, and strategies for growing your “frenemies” list.

And if those frenemies turn out to be flat-out friends … so much the better.

To get the full series, just stay tuned here at Copyblogger. If you haven’t already, why not subscribe by email so you’ll be sure you don’t miss any of the series.

How about you?

Have you ever worked cooperatively with a competitor toward a common goal?

Let us know about it in the comments.

About the Author: Sonia Simone is co-founder and CMO of Copyblogger Media. Get more from Sonia on Twitter and Google+.

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