Tag Archive | "Loving"

Followerwonk Is Moving On to a New, Loving Home

Posted by adamf

We have exciting news to share with you about our Twitter analytics tool, Followerwonk! For a while now we’ve been looking for a new home for the tool. We’re very pleased to announce that Marc Mims, one of the tool’s original developers, formed a company to acquire it and will continue to operate the popular service under the Followerwonk brand.

A little history

In August 2016, we announced our intention to sell Followerwonk. It’s a useful and powerful application, but since acquiring it in 2012, we discovered that the overlap between users of Followerwonk and users of our core SEO products was smaller than we anticipated. To address that problem, in 2015 we offered it as a separate subscription — part of a larger strategy to extend our services beyond SEO. Last year we made some hard choices, ultimately deciding to refocus our efforts on our SEO core. It was then that we decided to seek a better home for our Twitter analytics tool.

Marc and Followerwonk go way back. As an engineer on the team that originally built and launched the tool, he came on board at Moz in 2012 when Moz first acquired it. He spent his first year on the Moz engineering team working on Followerwonk, and then a year working on Open Site Explorer, after which he returned to Followerwonk to help us relaunch it as a standalone product. In August 2016 we put Followerwonk in a holding pattern while we sought a buyer; during this time, Marc stayed on as a contractor to keep it healthy and operational for existing customers.

When Marc made an offer to acquire the product, it was like everything had come full circle; we were delighted to know Followerwonk will continue in good hands. There are only a few buyers in the world who could bring Marc’s knowledge and passion for Followerwonk to the table.

In the months since August 2016, Marc spent his time making improvements and optimizations to the backend. He has quietly deployed 52 releases of Followerwonk in that time, improving performance and stability. He’s excited to be able to start adding new features now, too.

What does this mean for existing customers?

It means you can expect continued service from the product you love and the addition of new features and capabilities in the future. Moz will continue to host Followerwonk during a transition period while Marc prepares it to run on its own infrastructure. During that time, you can continue to use Followerwonk as you always have.

As Marc and Moz work together to transfer the service, Followerwonk customers should not notice much change; most of the work will be happening behind the scenes. Accounts will be transferred securely, and we will communicate directly with customers if any actions are required.

If you have legacy access to Followerwonk as part of your Moz Pro subscription from before its 2015 relaunch as a separate service, you will continue to have uninterrupted access to the tool through the transition period. Near the end of that period, Marc and Moz will jointly make a special offer allowing you to subscribe to Followerwonk and continue using it after the tool has left Moz’s infrastructure.

The transition period should take between three and six months. During that time, you can access the tool through your Moz login at https://moz.com/followerwonk. Afterwards, you’ll find it at https://followerwonk.com.

We’ll be sure to reach out to all customers and those with legacy access to provide more details well before any changes occur.

Final thoughts

In our hearts and minds, this is absolutely the best possible outcome for Followerwonk. It continues in the hands of a strong engineer, a beloved and respected member of the Moz team, an incredibly TAGFEE person, and someone who knows Followerwonk inside and out. Please join us in wishing Marc great success as he builds a team and a business around Followerwonk, giving it the love and attention it richly deserves.


If you’ve got any questions, would like a few more details, or simply wish to congratulate Marc in person, head over to the Q&A post he authored here and join the conversation!

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How I Learned to Start Loving Social Media’s Darkside

I’m baaaaaaack.

Organic Listings

What a fun past couple years it has been in the digital marketing landscape; we’ve seen hummingbirds, ads displacing organic listings, phantoms, ads displacing organic listings, rank brain, and of course ads displacing organic listings. It has been such a long time since my last post that back when I was last writing for SEObook we were still believing in the timelines provided by Google employees on when Penguin was going to run next. Remember that? Oh, the memories.

Idiot Proof SEO Concepts You Better Not Screw Up For Me

The reason I’m back is to share a tip. Normally I don’t share SEO tips because by sharing information on a tactic, I end up burning the tactic and killing whatever potential usable market value remained on its shelf life. Why share then? Because this isn’t something you can kill; it involves people. And killing people is bad. To explain how it works though, I need to explain the two concepts I’m smashing together like chocolate and peanut butter.

Keepin' it REAL.

Chocolate

The chocolate, aka Influencer Marketing – my definition of influencer marketing is having someone tell your story for you. Some people view influencer marketing as paying someone like Kim Kardashian $ 50,000 to post a picture of herself on Instagram holding a sample of your new line of kosher pickles. While that does fit under my definition as well, I consider that aspirational influencer marketing since her audience is primarily comprised of being aspiring to be Kim. Also equally valid is having Sally your foodie neighbor posting that picture in exchange for getting a free jar of those delicious pickles; in this particular case though the influence would be considered peer level influence since Sally’s audience is going to be comprised largely of people that view Sally as their equal, and possibly recognize that Sally as a foodie knows her food. Personally, I am biased, but I prefer lots of peer influence campaigns than a single big budget aspirational influence campaign, but I digress. If you want to learn a lot more about differences in the campaign types, I spoke with Bronco on the ins and outs of influence.

Peanut Butter

The peanut butter, aka Online Reputation Management, aka ORM – while I would hope reputation management doesn’t need to be specifically defined, I’ll define it anyhow as changing the online landscape for the benefit of a client’s (or your own) reputation. Peanut butter is a really good analogy for ORM because a lot of work gets spread around in a lot of directions, from creating hundreds of thousands of properties designed to flood the SERPs and social channels as a tail that wags the dog, to straight up negative SEO. Yeah, I said it. If negative SEO wasn’t made so much more available due to Panda, Penguin, and the philosophical neative a priori shift, in ORM would not be the industry that it is today.

So what’s the tip? You can combine these two concepts for your clients, and you can do it in a variety of different ways. Let’s walk through a few…

POSITIVE/BENIGN Focus

  1. Use aspirational influence to find a blogger/writer to talk about your client or product.
  2. Use peer influence indirectly to let a more difficult to approach blogger/writer “discover” your client and write about him or her.
  3. Use aspirational influence as a means to gain links to some properties. Seriously, this works really well. Some audiences will write a series of articles on whatever certain individuals writes about.
  4. Use peer influence to change tone/meaning of a negative article to something more benign.
  5. Use peer influence to find bloggers/writers to discuss concepts that can only be disucssed by referencing you or your client.

NEGATIVE Focus

  1. Use peer pressure influence to get material removed.
  2. Use aspirational influence to change the mind of blogger/writer (think politics – this works).
  3. Use peer influence to change links from one target to another in source material (this occurs quite a bit on Wikipedia too).
  4. THE TRUMP® CARD©: Use aspirational influence and peer influence in combination, which I call compulsion marketing, to inspire frightening movements and witchunts (coordinated DOS attacks, protests, crap link blasts, et al).

My business partner at my influencer marketing network Intellifluence, Terry Godier, and I also refer to some of the above topics under the umbrella of dark influence. I’m sure this list isn’t even close to exhaustive, mainly because I don’t want to go too deep on how scary one can get. If you need to address such things, I still take on select ORM clients at Digital Heretix and can help you out or refer you to a quality professional that will. Combining concepts and tactics is often a lot more fun than trying to approach a tactic singularly; when possible, work in multiple dimensions.

Think of a way that I missed or some cool concepts that could be paired to be more powerful? Let me know on Twitter.

Cheers,
Joe Sinkwitz

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Are People Loving Google+ or Hating It?

Posted by Laura Lippay

Music selection to enjoy while reading this post: Love Me Two Times by The Doors

Quick – who am I describing with these sentiments: great, awesome, interesting, cool, better than Facebook, annoying, boring, stupid…

You got it (and of course the title of the post probbbbably gave it away) – Google Plus (aka Google+ aka Google plus 1 aka the Facebook Killer aka that new Google social thing).

Those terms are just some of the emotions that people have around the product. In a nutshell, people are amped about Google+, as you can see from this sentiment chart that shows positive and negative sentiment for Google Plus over the past few weeks.

But 35% of people talking online about Google+ are doing it on Twitter, followed by 24% on blogs and 16% on social networks, so I have to wonder how many of us talking about it are talking about it because we’re /*nerds*/ and #social #media #marketers who can’t help but squeal like schoolgirls about good ol’, sock-em-in-the-eye-with-the-next-big-thing Silicon Valley rivalry in the hottest online movement since the indoctrination of Web 2.0.

I also can’t help but wonder if we GeekTechMarketerNerds are skewing the sentiment, since people I’ve talked to in the real world (like, not through a computer) have often said "yeah it’s cool but now what do I do?"

So what’s really behind all of this positive sentiment? Let’s look under the hood. Of 5,332 sound bites (aka mentions) expressing positive emotions for Google+, 21% like it and 16% love it. On the negative side, 34% hate it and 19% don’t like it (that’s from a smaller segment of 736 sound bites).

Positive emotions around Google Plus

People who expressed positive emotions other than "love" or "awesome" seem to like it rather lackadaisically with somewhat weak emotions like "interesting", "enjoy", and "cool". The smaller group of people who expressed negative emotions seem to be a bit more ferocious with "hate", "f*ck", "annoying", "boring", "evil" and "stupid".

Negative emotions around Google+

We can also look at the intended behaviors people have expressed around Google Plus. With Google’s need-to-know-someone-in-the-in-crowd invitation-only launch it’s only natural that 17% of the positive behaviors were made up of "need" and "want".

Positive intended behaviors around Google Plus

People want Google Plus

Most people are talking about using it, and more people are talking about trying it than switching to it.

Negative behaviors are even more interesting: 21% don’t get it, won’t get it or can’t get it, 5% think it’s a waste, 8% don’t want or need it, and 2% don’t trust it. Ouch. But again, the negative sentiments overall were on a much smaller scale, so there are fewer of these than positives.

Negative intended behaviors for Google+

People don't get, can't get, or refuse to get Google Plus

Lastly, inquiring minds want to know… Is Google+ a Facebook killer? Well, here’s what the data tells us: 13% of the positive “likes” about the product are people saying they think it’s better than Facebook, 13% think Google+ makes it easier, and 9% think Google can do more things better than other competitive products. A sign of what’s in store or just the sentiment of a bunch of us over-excited geeks? Tough to say.

What people like about Google Plus

What does Google still have to work on? An easy way to get an RSS feed seems to be top-of-mind, followed by other technical limitations, their terms of service, and maybe just being a little less scary to some people. Oh, and is it too late to do something about that name…(and their use-your-real-name profile policy)?

What people don't like about Google+

Google+ dislike: no rss

Google+ dislike: terms of service

Google Plus dislike: technical limitations

Google Plus dislike: trouble figuring it out

Google+ dislike: the name

Next reports to run…Google Panda?

 

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