Tag Archive | "Landing"

Effective Landing Pages: 30 powerful headlines that improved marketing results

Get oodles of examples of effective headlines in this MarketingSherpa blog post to help spark ideas as you brainstorm your own headlines
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Landing Page Optimization: Original MarketingSherpa Landing Page Handbook now available for free download

The MarketingSherpa Landing Page Handbook is one of the most popular resources we have offered in 20 years of publishing, and we are now offering this handbook free to you, the MarketingSherpa reader.
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How to create landing pages that convert

Landing pages can make or break your digital marketing.



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Should My Landing Page Be SEO-Focused, Conversion-Focused, or Both? – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

What’s more important: drawing in more traffic, or converting the traffic you have? When it comes to your landing pages, that may be a tough question to answer. After watching today’s Whiteboard Friday, you’ll be better equipped to decide whether your site should opt for an SEO focus, a conversion focus, or a strategic balance of both.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re going to chat about landing pages and conversion-focused landing pages versus SEO-focused landing pages.

So a few weeks back, I was at Unbounce’s CTA Conference up in Vancouver, Canada, which was an amazing event, one of the best conferences that’s put on in our industry, in my opinion. I got a question from a few folks there about how to decide whether to target a landing page toward SEO, toward conversion rate optimization and conversion-focused, or whether we could combine those. So I thought we’d chat a little bit about that today. It is quite doable.

An SEO-focused landing page has a few features that are unique from a conversion-focused landing page. In fact, both of them are unique. So what I’m going to do is use the example of Little Hotelier. Little Hotelier offers reservation software, front desk software for small hotels, B2Bs, guesthouses. I thought we could imagine basically a resource page on their website that was really a landing page that’s focused on SEO around a hotel booking site database. So, of course, one of the things you have to do if you’re a small hotel, or a B2B, or a guesthouse is you’ve got to get listed on hundreds if not thousands of different listing sites — Booking.com, Expedia, Travelocity, Kayak, etc., etc., all the way down the list, down to the very local-focused ones or regional-focused ones.

Managing all those listings is a real pain. So is managing the front desk and the bookings and making sure that everything is convenient. So Little Hotelier manages all this for us and has a resource page. It’s not quite as good as the one I’m going to describe here. But let’s just imagine for a sec that they have this list of all the hotel booking sites, a database of it with all the information you might want. Then, of course, they have their conversion-focused page, littlehotelier.com, their homepage, which is really all-in-one business software for B&Bs, and guesthouses and small hotels. This is very conversion-focused. They’re trying directly to get people to buy the product.

This page is much more resource-focused. They’re trying to get people to see, “Hey, here are all of those sites that, well, of course, Little Hotelier can help list you on and manage for you, but also here’s just generic and general information about them.” I think it’d be awesome if they listed all of these sites and included things like traffic and the number of bookings that they saw from those sites in 2015, the requirements to get listed, and the submission page. Then they could have a CTA, a call to action like, “Let Little Hotelier manage hotel bookings for your property.”

This would work really as an SEO-focused landing page. It’s designed to draw traffic in, to drive keywords like “list of hotel booking sites,” “where to submit my small hotel,” “most visited hotel booking sites.” You could even make regional-focused ones of this, like “hotel listing sites New Zealand” if they wanted to have a New Zealand-focused set of sites where you could submit or manage yourself in the booking world. This one is really much more targeted, hypertargeted, only focused on the keywords that are going to convert people directly, like “small hotel software” or “B&B hotel reservation software,” that kind of stuff.

The differences and identifying your needs

The differences between these two and the way to identify whether you need one or the other or need a mix of them is to ask a few questions. First off:

  • Are you trying to rank for generic keywords or conversion-focused keywords?
  • Are you trying to rank for both?
  • Are you not worried about keyword rankings at all and you’re only concerned with conversion?

If you’re only concerned with conversion, then you want this one. But if you are worried about both ranking for keywords and trying to convert some visitors, you probably want a more content-focused page like this one, a more SEO-focused landing page.

Bounce rate and engagement rate

One of the needs that you have with SEO is that you need low bounce rate and high engagement rate. But the reverse is true here. You don’t necessarily need to worry about bounce rate, engagement rate, you only need to worry about conversion rate.

SEO-focused: So this needs a low bounce rate and a high click-through rate. You want people staying on this page, you want them to click the call to action, and you want them to investigate more.

Conversion-focused: But on this page, actually a high bounce rate is okay if the conversion rate is high. So if people are converting from this page, it doesn’t matter too much if a lot of people visit and many of them go away from here. That’s not too important to you. You’re just worried about conversion rate and optimizing for that conversion rate. If you can bring that up a percent, you don’t mind if bounce rate also goes up 5% or 6% or 7% because you’re turning people off who are the wrong customers.

Keyword targeting

SEO-focused: Here, you’ve got to have keyword-targeted content. That means the content itself needs to fulfill all the requirements that Google has and that visitors have around what they’re looking for.

Conversion-focused: This, keyword targeting is secondary or might even be unnecessary entirely.

Editorial links

SEO-focused: This needs to be able to earn editorial links or it can’t rank. If it can’t earn editorial links, it’s going to have a very, very difficult time with manual link building to a conversion-focused page. Commercially-focused pages are much tougher.

Conversion-focused: But this one doesn’t even need to worry about links at all.

Audience

SEO-focused: This one has to serve many audiences. It’s treated really like a piece of content that helps anyone who’s looking for this information and then has a CTA, a call to action on the page.

Conversion-focused: But this one needs to be heavily focused on one particular audience, the particular audience Little Hotelier is trying to convert who’s the right customer for them, for their software. Hopefully, those folks are already qualified.

SEO-focused: These folks over here are not necessarily qualified. This might be part of the qualification process. If you visit this page and you then say, “Huh, I’m kind of interested in letting them manage my bookings,” maybe you should end up here, on this landing page that is conversion-focused.

Traffic

SEO-focused: This page should be driving traffic to those more conversion rate-focused pages.

Conversion-focused: This page, yes, it might rank for some keywords, but it’s primarily concerned with direct conversions, and hopefully it’s receiving traffic from other onsite channels, like this one, or offsite paid channels that are driving very targeted visitors.

What I’d urge you to do is ask yourself these questions when you’re considering a landing page. Am I trying to earn traffic that might be interested in my content? If so, you’re building one of these (SEO-focused). If you’re trying to target an audience that is already qualified, that’s already familiar with you, or that you’re trying to get familiar with your product, then you’re really trying to convert them, in which case you want one of these (conversion-focused).

Conversion-focused: These pages are great for doing tons of landing page testing and optimization. They’re great for videos. They’re great for testimonials.

SEO-focused: These types of pages are great for content. They’re great for serving all sorts of visitor intense. They’re great for targeting a large set of keywords that all have the same searcher intent.

When you try and mix these, things get a little challenging. That’s where you really need to balance out and decide: “Hey, what is my primary goal here? Serve the searcher audience, which may not be conversion-focused, or convert people and not worry so much about the searcher audience. Maybe try to capture them on other pages before they get here.”

All right, everyone, look forward to your comments, and we’ll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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Overcoming Your Fear of Local Landing Pages

Posted by MiriamEllis

[Estimated read time: 12 minutes]

When tasked with developing a set of city landing pages for your local business clients, do you experience any of the following: brain fog, dry mouth, sweaty palms, procrastination, woolgathering, or ennui? Then chances are, the diagnosis is a fear of local landing pages. But don’t worry! Confusion and concern over this common challenge have made it an FAQ in the local column of the Moz Q&A forum, and my goal here is to give you a prescription for meeting these projects with confidence, creativity, and even genuine enjoyment!

Up ahead: a definition, a “don’t” list, a plan of action, and a landing page mockup.

Quick definition: What’s a local landing page?

Local landing pages (aka city landing pages) are pages you create on a website to highlight a geographic aspect of a business for its customers. Local landing pages are most appropriate for:

  • Service area businesses (SABs) that need to publicize the fact that they serve a variety of cities surrounding the city in which they are physically located. In this scenario, the goal of most local landing pages is to gain organic rankings for these service cities, as they’re unlikely to earn local pack rankings unless there is minimal geographic competition for the services offered.
  • Multi-location brick-and-mortar businesses that need to publicize the fact that they have more than one forward-facing office. In this scenario, the goal will often be to get multiple offices ranking in the local packs by linking from the Google My Business listing for each office to its respective local landing page on the company’s website. You may also achieve organic visibility, as well, depending on the competition.

Diminish your fear by knowing what to avoid

Knowledge is power. By avoiding these common pitfalls, you’ll feel confident knowing that you’re developing a new set of pages that will help your client’s website, rather than harming it.

1. Do not publish fake addresses on local landing pages.

Tell clients that PO Boxes and virtual offices are considered ineligible in Google’s guidelines, so it’s not a good idea to use them on the website in an attempt to appear more local.

Be especially cautious here if your client is an SAB and gives you a string of addresses. Of course, an SAB can have multiple legitimate locations (like a pizza delivery chain) but if it’s a small business, your due diligence is required to make absolutely sure the addresses are legitimate and do not represent your client’s brother’s house, aunt’s house, friend’s house, etc.

Look the addresses up via Google Streetview. Do you see residences, or even empty lots? Red flag! Let such clients know that Google can read street-level signage and doesn’t take kindly to falsified address information. Google understands that SABs may operate out of a single home, but operating out a string of homes may look (and be!) spammy.

2. Do not engage in creating local landing pages for clients who lack a reasonable amount of time to discuss their business with you.

A minimum requirement is that they can have a phone session with you for each city you’re going to cover, but a much better hope lies with clients who are willing to make an active contribution to the project. *More on this later.

3. Do not engage in creating local landing pages if you don’t have enough information about the business to avoid creating thin or duplicate content.

This is related to point 2. Writing a paragraph and swapping out the city names on a set of pages is not a good plan, and you’ll encounter this lazy scenario on countless local business websites. Don’t be tempted to go this route just because your client’s competitors are getting away with it. Properly view them as weak competitors whom you can surpass with a superior effort.

4. Do not create city landing pages if no one involved in the project (including yourself) can discover a genuine reason (apart from a desire to rank) to differentiate cities and services from one another.

Don’t create these pages unless you can honestly say that you believe they will be useful and interesting to the company’s customers. *Suggestions for inspiration to follow.

5. Do not stuff local landing pages with blocks of city names, zip codes, or keywords.

Google’s Webmaster guidelines specifically state that they do not like this.

6. Beware call tracking numbers.

If your client wants to use call tracking numbers, be sure you fully understand the risks and options.

7. Do not bury your local landings pages somewhere deep within the architecture of the website.

Link to them from a high-level menu.

8. Finally, do not build an unreasonable number of landing pages.

At some point in your work as a local SEO, you will be contacted by a company that serves most or all of a state, or multiple states. They will say, “Our goal is to rank for every single town and city in our service area.” If your client serves California, there are some 500 incorporated cities in the state, not to mention thousands of tiny towns.

Can you honestly build thousands of unique, high-quality pages?

With enough funding and a large staff of copywriters, this might be possible, but it’s going to be the exception rather than the rule for small-to-medium local businesses. It’s generally more reasonable to have the client designate their most important cities and target these first. Then, if need be, move on from there, provided that you can avoid all 7 of the above pitfalls in creating further landing pages. Recommending PPC for more minute coverage may be a wiser alternative to prevent website quality from suffering.

Sigh of relief! Now that you know the major errors to avoid, you can move forward with the landing page development project feeling confident that your work is going to help your client, rather than harming them. Gather that tension up into a ball and cast it away!

Jump-start landing page inspiration with tools, talk and action

Here’s a ready-made process for generating ideas for the content you’re going to be developing. I’m going to make the assumption that you’ve already had your client fill out some sort of questionnaire prior to taking them on. This questionnaire may have been really detailed, or kind of generic. If it missed geo-specific questions, the following process will help you glean the initial information you need from the business owner.

1. Ask your client (more) questions

By now, you’ve assessed that your client is willing to be engaged in the landing page process. Now, either create a second questionnaire, or, if preferable for both of you, get on the phone and cover all of the following:

    • Every service offered
    • Every major city/town served
    • Most typical type of client
    • Most typical client requests/needs/questions
    • Services, tips, or advice that are unique to each city (such as different requirements based on laws, weather, terrain, style, precautions, codes, etc)
    • Types of satisfaction guarantees offered
    • Specials offered
    • Why the business is better than its competitors
    • Who those competitors are
    • Participation in or support of local events, teams and organizations

*As you take notes, be sure you’re jotting down not just what your client says, but how they say it. Language matters, not only as a means of learning the lingo of your client’s industry, but in discovering whether corporate lingo actually matches customer speech.

2. Assess their local landing pages

From your notes from conversation #1, you’re ready to first pay a virtual call to the websites of every major local competitor your client mentioned. Assess their local landing pages, if they have them, for content quality, usability, and usefulness. There’s a good chance that you’ll see lazy efforts that you can surpass with your own work. Take notes about what you like and don’t like in the competitors’ landing pages. Note, too, what keywords they’re targeting.

3. Transform your notes into content

Now, it’s time to take your notes and turn them into:

    • Unique, introductory text regarding the client’s services in each city
    • At least one unique customer question and owner answer per page
    • Specific advice/tips for that city that are unique to that city

4. Discover common questions and find their answers

Next, let’s fire up a really awesome tool to start generating additional topics. Hat tip to Linda Buquet who first alerted me to AnswerThePublic.com, a free tool that enables you to type in a keyword and generate the best list of related questions I’ve ever seen. It’s available in 5 countries, and even a simple search like “house painting” turns up 24 questions you can sort through to discover what types of queries people are commonly making about your client’s business model.

Return to the business owner for expert answers. Bingo! By now, you’ve got some very useful content already taking shape to help differentiate one landing page from another. I also like combing through Google’s “related searches” at the bottom of SERPs for further ideas.

5. Incorporate appropriate visuals

Now we turn to the visual documentation of your client’s business. Have them equip a designated staff member with a camera, either to take before-and-after photos of projects or to do a full video documentary of a minimum of 1–3 projects per city.

If your client’s industry isn’t of exceptional visual interest (plumbing, HVAC, accounting) a modest visual documentation, accompanied by a text transcript, should be sufficient to give customers a good idea of what it would be like to work with the business. If your client’s industry is highly visual (landscaping, architecture, home staging), the more you can show off their best work, the better. For the sake of authenticity, be sure that photo labeling and tagging are specific to the target city and that video narratives mention the target city.

    • While you’re shooting footage, consider getting 1–3 video testimonials in each city from very happy clients and write transcripts. If competition isn’t stiff, even a single video testimonial can set the business apart. In tougher markets, go to extra effort with this step.
    • An alternative (or addition) to video testimonials is use of an on-page traditional review app. And don’t forget that brick-and-mortar businesses can link to their various profiles on third-party review sites (Yelp, Google, etc).
    • Have widely recognized customers? Get their permission to brag about it! For example: “We clean the carpets at every branch of Bank of America in San Diego,” “We designed the Transamerica building in San Francisco,” or “We groomed the Pomeranian who won Best in Class at the Boston Dog Show.” Be city-specific with this content.
    • Consider the usefulness of interviewing staff who either operate each brick-and-mortar office or who travel to serve the SAB’s customers. A short, welcoming video that displays professionalism, approachability, and company ideals can help customers feel comfortable even before a transaction occurs.
    • If there is an element of the business that changes from location to location (brick-and-mortar) or from city to city (SAB), be sure you are aware of this and describing this on the page. Some examples would be a class schedule for a yoga studio that’s unique to each location, or a landscaping company’s recommended schedule of yard cleaning at high elevations versus valley floor locations. This content should be highly visible on the page, as it’s highly relevant to city-specific user groups.
    • Finally, think back to your assessment of your client’s competitors. Is there something they weren’t doing and that isn’t mentioned above that your client’s business inspires you to showcase? Maybe it’s something funny, extra persuasive, or extra local in flavor that would help your client stand out as particularly individualistic. Don’t hesitate to go beyond my basic suggestions to provide a creative edge for your client.

Pulling it all together

Fear is now a thing of the past. While you may be a bit buried under a heap of notebooks, spreadsheets, and docs, you’ve gathered both confidence and a wealth of resources for getting these local landing pages built. Whether you’re working with the owner’s webmaster or are implementing the development yourself, I hope the following basic mockup will help you get organized.

*I’m using an SAB for my example — a fictitious house painter who is targeting the town of Mendocino, California as part of his service area. If your landing pages are for a multi-location brick-and-mortar business, be certain that the very first thing on the page is the complete name, address and phone number of the respective location, preferably in Schema.

Click the image for a larger version in a new tab.

Key to the mockup

  1. This section covers your introductory text — including a basic description of what the company does — plus geographic-specific advice, satisfaction guarantee information, and a mention of well-known clients served.
  2. Here is a vertical section featuring 3 project showcase videos + text project summaries.
  3. The reviews section features an on-page review widget, a request for customers to leave a review, and an invitation to see further reviews on third-party platforms.
  4. Here’s where we put our question research to work, with the owner answering questions he says customers frequently ask, plus questions generated by a tool and other research.
  5. Here’s an area for extra creativity. We’re featuring a “Meet the Owner” video, some relevant local news, and mentioning company support for local entities, including a special deal.
  6. While we’ve sprinkled calls-to-action throughout the page, never forget that final CTA in closing up!

Speaking of closing up…

Your landing pages won’t look exactly like my sample mockup (hopefully they’ll be a lot nicer!) but I do hope this exercise has helped you gain confidence in moving fearlessly forward with these projects. I want to stress again the importance of owner involvement in this scenario. Your questionnaires and phone conversations are invaluable, and even if you have to use a crowbar with some clients, the effort truly shows in the authenticity, usefulness, and persuasiveness of the finished product.

I did want to take a minute to talk about scale, because this also comes up pretty frequently in our forum. Depending on available funding and creativity, the approach I’ve described is likely scalable for a medium-to-large business with anywhere from two to a few dozen target cities. Once you get beyond that, the project might get out of hand in terms of ROI, but I want to provide a couple of real-world examples.

  1. I’ve cited REI before, but I’ll do it again. They operate 143 stores across 36 states, and I continue to be impressed by the effort they’ve made to differentiate their landing pages for each location. An interactive map drills down to pages like this: http://www.rei.com/stores/san-diego.html. They’re not quite as text-intensive as my mockup, but the inclusion of a schedule of interesting local events makes these pages feel cared-for and worth visiting.
  2. If you’re operating at a similar scale, like Orchard Supply Hardware with 91 stores, and don’t feel you can or should make the investment in landing pages, you’ll likely end up going with something like a city/zip code search that shows store NAP in a given radius. Granted, this approach is going to be lacking in SEO opportunities, but if your brand is big enough and your competition isn’t too tough, it’s an option.

Do you have any other good ideas for making your local landing pages valuable? Please share them with the community!

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SearchCap: Slow Google Panda, SEO Landing Pages & TheLandys Extended

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Slow Google Panda, SEO Landing Pages & TheLandys Extended appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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3 Articles that Will Help You Craft Smarter Landing Pages

Copyblogger Collection: show your prospects you have what they need

Chances are, it hasn’t been too long since you’ve had a miscommunication with someone — possibly a spouse, child, parent, or coworker.

You thought that person understood what you said, but he interpreted your message in a different way than you intended.

Miscommunications on landing pages occur when you think you’ve explicitly stated why a prospect should take action and that prospect isn’t convinced your call to action is the right step for him to take.

To avoid disappointing conversion rates on your landing pages, this week’s Copyblogger Collection is a series of three handpicked articles that show you:

  • How to create a deep connection with your prospects and customers
  • How 26 fun rhymes will help you focus on your landing page goal
  • How savvy marketers write landing page copy

As you work your way through the material below, think of these lessons as a mini landing page course.


How to Create a Deep Connection with Your Prospects and Customers

In How to Create a Deep Connection with Your Prospects and Customers, Sonia Simone says:

If you intend to sell something — to ask for someone’s hard-earned money and irreplaceable time — you must begin by seeing (and honoring) who they are.

You’ll learn three key components that will help you create a bond with your prospect and express that connection with clarity.


The ABCs of Landing Pages That Work [Infographic]

landing-pages-that-work

You know landing pages are an important part of your digital business — but you probably wish they were a little more fun, right?

Steven Lowe has granted your wish in The ABCs of Landing Pages That Work. The infographic he created with the help of designer Lauren Mancke provides a rhyming landing page tip for each letter of the alphabet.

Since you want your readers to act because your products and services assist them with something they lack, this infographic will keep you on track!


The Savvy Marketer’s Checklist for Seductive Landing Pages

landing-page-checklist

Finally, you can download and print the editable PDF we provide in The Savvy Marketer’s Checklist for Seductive Landing Pages.

Henneke created this landing page checklist to bring the best landing page advice together in one place.

She walks you through each step of the landing page creation process — from writing persuasive copy to editing effectively and designing for clarity.

Accelerate your landing page education

Use this post (and save it for future reference!) to accelerate your landing page education in a fun, easy, and manageable way that will help you build your digital business.

This is doable. These articles are for you.

We’ll see you back here on Monday with a fresh topic to kick off the week!

About the author

Stefanie Flaxman

Stefanie Flaxman is Copyblogger Media’s Editor-in-Chief. Don’t follow her on Twitter.

The post 3 Articles that Will Help You Craft Smarter Landing Pages appeared first on Copyblogger.


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Evil Tips for Landing Page Optimization – Sonia Simone

Sonia Simone - Authority Rainmaker 2015

Is marketing evil? Sonia Simone kicked off her Authority Rainmaker 2015 presentation with a question that has certainly been asked before. Unfortunately we’ve all come across misguided campaigns that seem intended to trick people rather than help them. But that’s not how it’s supposed to be.

“Like brushing your teeth before going out on a date, marketing is about putting a good face on what you have”, explains Sonia. You may be able to pull the wool over people’s eyes in the short term, but tricking your audience is a sure path to failure in the long run. Every brand’s reputation is pretty easy to research on the internet these days and people just aren’t dumb enough for a truly ‘evil’ strategy to work.

So, effective digital marketing is decidedly not ‘evil’, but can we learn something from evil people? According to Sonia, we certainly can. Drawing on some classic villains including Dr. Evil and the Joker, Sonia laid out how well-meaning digital marketers can benefit from adding just a little ‘evil’ to their landing pages.

Dr Evils Landing Page Optimization Tips - Authority Rainmaker 2015

Always Try to Shoot Fish from a Barrel

The best way to generate conversions from your landing pages is simply to make it easy for people to convert. Like a barrel, a well-constructed landing page puts visitors directly in the firing line of your offer and doesn’t include ‘leaks’ or distractions to divert them from converting.

To get more ‘fish’ into your barrel, it needs to be inviting to your audience. Make sure your landing pages (and by extension your whole website) look professional, are easy to use and load fast. Test your forms across all major devices and browsers, then test them again. Even better, ask your grandma to test them.

Also, your offering needs to be something that people actually want. As Sonia explained, if you’re trying to sell broccoli ice cream, it doesn’t matter how well you market it, because nobody wants that.

Social Proof is Scarily Effective

Just like nobody wants to miss a party that they know their friends will be attending, people are much more motivated to join a list, download an ebook or sign up for an offer if there is evidence that others like them have already taken the same action.

Smart marketers have been aware of the power of social proof for a long time and the really smart ones are incorporating it into their landing pages to help them convert better.

A few ways to take advantage of the evil power of social proof:

  • Endorsements from influential people in the industry
  • Case studies
  • Social share count widgets
  • Facebook Like Boxes

 Landing Page Title Optimization - Authority Rainmaker 2015

Don’t Be Too Clever

Catchy clickbait headlines may work well for BuzzFeed, but they are notoriously poor performers on landing pages.

One of the fundamentals of high-converting landing page is clarity of messaging. While clever headlines may be attention grabbing, they are often confusing and confusion is the enemy of action.

In addition, confusing messaging can lower the perceived trust people have for your company, which is absolutely the last thing you want when potential business is on the line. Would you prefer to trust your health to a doctor who knew her craft, or one who could entertain you with jokes?

There’s a time and place for cleverness, but landing pages are rarely a good fit for either.

 The Terrifying Power of the Call to Action - Authority Rainmaker 2015

A Good Call to Action is Like Jedi Mind Control

When it comes to landing pages, your biggest competitor is inaction. Everyone’s attention is extremely limited, so make sure you aren’t wasting your audience’s time by being confusing or ambiguous with what they are supposed to do by including a good call to action.

Really killer calls to action have the following attributes:

  • Incredible clarity
  • A clear benefit
  • Builds trust

Provide Multiple Paths to Your Evil Lair

Any evil genius with any credibility has at least a few routes to reach their lair. There’s the hallway with spikes that pop out, the ventilation shaft hidden behind a bush and of course the front door (with lasers or something…).

Each of these distinct paths to the inside of your lair appeals to a different kind of secret agent or commando. The cautious and pragmatic spy will likely prefer to take their time and slink in through the ventilation shaft, while the overpowered bruiser henchmen will crash their way through the front door.

Similarly, visitors to your landing pages are likely to respond to different paths to conversion. Varying degrees of experience with your brand, places in the sales cycle and personal values are a few factors that can cause people to respond better to different messages or formats.

Boiling it down, Sonia says there are two major categories which your visitors are likely to fall into:

  • Already sold – These are the people who know what they want, know you can deliver it and are ready to convert. Make sure you have a direct, frictionless, straight-to-the-point path to conversion for these visitors. Don’t waste their time.
  • Need some convincing – There’s a reason these people made it to your landing page (perhaps a useful blog post, ebook, or webinar you created?), but they’re not quite sold yet. A softer call to action will likely work much better for these visitors to help convince them it’s worth it to become a customer.

Make People Feel Safe

In order for evil geniuses to be successful, they must be able to build trust. In order for your landing pages to convert visitors into customers, you have to do the same.

According to Sonia, your audience’s single biggest fear is feeling stupid. Most people want to believe that your offering is everything you claim it is, but they can’t be sure until it’s too late. What if they buy your product and it doesn’t work? What if they join your email list and receive nothing but spam? What if they come to your webinar and you share incorrect or unhelpful information?

All of these unfortunate outcomes can make someone feel pretty stupid. Unfortunately, anyone who has used the internet for a while has probably been in at least one of these situations before, so they have built in wariness about it happening again. Therefore, in order to convert visitors to customers, you need to help them overcome the fear that you’ll make them feel stupid again.

In order to help your audience feel safe to do business with you, make sure your landing pages:

  • Project credibility
    • Include visual indicators such as security badges and privacy policy links.
    • List endorsements from trusted authorities.
    • Include references to other clients you work with.
  • Reverse the risk
    • Offer a money back guarantee.
    • Start with a free trial.

Evil is Good - Authority Rainmaker 2015

The objective of any strategic digital marketing campaign is to translate attention into action. A well made landing page can be scarily effective at doing just that. But, as the decidedly non-evil superhero Spiderman famously said, “with great power comes great responsibility”, so please make sure to use these evil landing page optimization tips for good.

Keep your eye here on Online Marketing Blog for coverage of Authority Rainmaker as well as Instagram, Flickr, Pinterest and Twitter @TopRank.


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Evil Tips for Landing Page Optimization – Sonia Simone | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Evil Tips for Landing Page Optimization – Sonia Simone appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

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The ABCs of Landing Pages That Work [Infographic]

The ABCs of Landing Pages that Work graphic

Landing pages are bread and butter. Landing pages never stutter.

Landing pages are rhyme and reason. Landing pages stay in season.

See what I did there? Rhymes help make learning fun and easy.

And when you want to make a living as a blogger, learning how to create landing pages that convert is a smart way to help you build your career online.

So, what’s even more fun than a list of rhymes that help you learn the fundamentals of effective landing pages?

An infographic that visually depicts each rhyme!

Landing page rhyme time

The ultra-creative Lauren Mancke designed this handy guide to help you remember landing page elements that make sales.

Since you want your readers to act because your products and services assist them with something they lack, this infographic will keep you on track.

Let’s jump right in to the ABCs of landing pages that work!




abcs-of-landing-pages-that-work-infographic

Want to publish this infographic on your own site?

Copy and paste the following code into your blog post or web page:

You can also click here to download a PDF of the infographic (133.6 MB), which is suitable for printing and hanging near your workspace when you need to see it most.

Over to you …

Can you think of a rhyme to help you remember your favorite landing page tip?

Which rhyme in the infographic will be your first priority the next time you create a landing page?

Head over to Google+ and let us know!

About the Author: Steven A. Lowe is a consultant, software developer, inventor, entrepreneur, author, musician, and lover of puns. He ran an innovative custom software development company for nearly a decade before joining ThoughtWorks as a Principal Consultant in 2014. Check out Steven’s ebook series on landing pages, and follow him on Twitter.

The post The ABCs of Landing Pages That Work [Infographic] appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

Posted in Latest NewsComments Off

The ABCs of Landing Pages That Work [Infographic]

The ABCs of Landing Pages that Work graphic

Landing pages are bread and butter. Landing pages never stutter.

Landing pages are rhyme and reason. Landing pages stay in season.

See what I did there? Rhymes help make learning fun and easy.

And when you want to make a living as a blogger, learning how to create landing pages that convert is a smart way to help you build your career online.

So, what’s even more fun than a list of rhymes that help you learn the fundamentals of effective landing pages?

An infographic that visually depicts each rhyme!

Landing page rhyme time

The ultra-creative Lauren Mancke designed this handy guide to help you remember landing page elements that make sales.

Since you want your readers to act because your products and services assist them with something they lack, this infographic will keep you on track.

Let’s jump right in to the ABCs of landing pages that work!




abcs-of-landing-pages-that-work-infographic

Want to publish this infographic on your own site?

Copy and paste the following code into your blog post or web page:

You can also click here to download a PDF of the infographic (133.6 MB), which is suitable for printing and hanging near your workspace when you need to see it most.

Over to you …

Can you think of a rhyme to help you remember your favorite landing page tip?

Which rhyme in the infographic will be your first priority the next time you create a landing page?

Head over to Google+ and let us know!

About the Author: Steven A. Lowe is a consultant, software developer, inventor, entrepreneur, author, musician, and lover of puns. He ran an innovative custom software development company for nearly a decade before joining ThoughtWorks as a Principal Consultant in 2014. Check out Steven’s ebook series on landing pages, and follow him on Twitter.

The post The ABCs of Landing Pages That Work [Infographic] appeared first on Copyblogger.


Copyblogger

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