Tag Archive | "first"

Katsuko Saruhashi Google doodle honors first woman elected to Science Council of Japan

Born on this day in 1920, Saruhashi was a renowned Japanese geochemist who spent her career advocating for female scientists.

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Elizabeth Blackwell Google doodle recognizes first woman in the US to earn a medical degree

A champion of women’s rights and an abolitionist, Blackwell was born on this date 197 years ago.

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The 3 Easiest Link Building Tactics Any Website Can Use to Acquire Their First 50 Links – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

Without a solid base of links, your site won’t be competitive in the SERPs — even if you do everything else right. But building your first few links can be difficult and discouraging, especially for new websites. Never fear — Rand is here to share three relatively quick, easy, and tool-free (read: actually free) methods to build that solid base and earn yourself links.

Link Building Tactics to Acquire Your 50 First Links

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we’re going to chat about how to get those first few links that every website needs to be able to compete. Many folks I know when you get started with link building, it can seem daunting and overwhelming.

So let me walk you through what is essentially a half a day of work, maybe three or four hours of work to try these three tactics that will almost certainly get your business or your organization the first handful, let’s say 50 links that you need to start being able to compete. Content can you take you a long way. Keywords can take you a long way. Engagement and interaction can take you a long way. But you’ve got to have a base of links. So let’s get started here.

#1. Your brand name, domain name, and founder’s/execs names

The first one is basically looking for links that come from your own name, your brand name, your domain name potentially, and the names of the founders or people who run your company.

Step One: Search Google for the names in quotes.

So if it was me and Moz, you’d be searching for “Rand Fishkin” or “Moz.com” in quotes, not the domain name in the URL field. But in the Google search bar, I’d be searching for “Moz.com” in quotes or “Moz + SEO.” Moz also has other meanings, including the singer Morrissey, which makes for confusing types of things. If you have that, you’ll need to use your brand name plus some sort of signifier or identifier. It’s very rare that Morrissey gets mentioned along with search engine optimization. It’s very often that Moz gets mentioned along with SEO, and so I can combine those to search for it. So any of these searches will result in a big list of tons of Google results.

Step Two: Manually check the top let’s say 50 to 100 results to confirm that…

  1. They link to the right place, and if they don’t, if there are mentions of Rand Fishkin that don’t link to Moz, we should fix that. We’re going to contact those people.
  2. If you can control the anchor text and where the link location points, you can update it. For example, I can go to my LinkedIn. My LinkedIn has a link to Moz. I could update that if I were at a different company or if Moz’s domain name changed, for example when it did change from SEOmoz to just Moz.
  3. If it’s missing or wrong, I find the right people, I email them, and I fix it. As a result, I should have something like this. Every single mention in Google has a link on the page to my website. I can get that from brand name, from domain name, and from founders and executives. That’s a lot of great links.

#2. Sites that list your competition

So this is essentially saying we’re going to…

Step One: Identify your top 5 or 10 most visible on the web competitors.

This is a process that you can go through on your own to identify, well, these are the 5 or 10 that we see on the web very frequently for searches that we wish we competed for, or we see them mentioned in the press a ton, whatever it is.

Step Two: Search Google not for each one individually, but rather for combinations, usually two, three, or four of them all together.

For example, if I were making a new whiteboard pen company, I would look for the existing ones, like Pilot and Expo and Quartet and PandaBoard. I might search for Pilot and PandaBoard first. Then I might search for Pilot and Expo. Then I might search for PandaBoard and Quartet and all these various combinations of these different ones.

Step Three: Visit any sites in the SERPs that list multiple competitors in any sort of format (a directory structure, comparisons, a list, etc.)

Then in each of those cases, I would submit or I would try and contact or get in touch with whoever runs that list and say, “Hey, my company, my organization also belongs on here because, like these other ones you’ve listed, we do the same thing.” So if it’s here’s whiteboard pen brands, Expo, PandaBoard, Quartet, and your site, which should now link to YourSite.com.

This is a little more challenging. You won’t have as high a hit rate as you will with your own brand names. But again, great way to expand your link portfolio. You can usually almost always get 20 or 30 different sites that are listing people in your field and get on those lists.

#3. Sites that list people/orgs in your field, your geography, with your attributes.

This is sites that list people or organizations in a particular field, a particular region, with particular attributes, or some combination of those three. So they’re saying here are European-based whiteboard pen manufacturers or European-based manufacturers who were founded by women.

So you can say, “Aha, that’s a unique attribute, that’s a geography, and that’s my field. I’m in manufacturing. I make whiteboard pens. Our cofounder was a woman, and we are in Europe. So therefore we count in all three of those. We should be on that list.” You’re looking for lists like these, which might not list your competitors, but are high-quality opportunities to get good links.

Step One:

  1. List your organization’s areas of operation. So that would be like we are in technology, or we’re in manufacturing or software or services, or we’re a utility, or we’re finance tech, or whatever we are. You can start from macro and go down to micro at each of those levels.
  2. List your geography in the same format from macro to micro. You want to go as broad as continent, for example Europe, down to country, region, county, city, even neighborhood. There are websites that list, “Oh, well, these are startups that are based in Ballard, Seattle, Washington in the United States in North America.” So you go, “Okay, I can fit in there.”
  3. List your unique attributes. Were you founded by someone whose attributes are different than normal? Moz, obviously my cofounder was my mom, Gillian. So Moz is a cofounded-by-a-woman company. Are you eco-friendly? Maybe you buy carbon credits to offset, or maybe you have a very eco-friendly energy policy. Or you have committed to donating to charity, like Salesforce has. Or you have an all-remote team. Or maybe you’re very GLBTQIA-friendly. Or you have a very generous family leave policy. Whatever interesting attributes there are about you, you can list those and then you can combine them.

Step Two: Search Google for lists of businesses or websites or organizations that have some of these attributes in your region or with your focus.

For example, Washington state venture-backed companies. Moz is a venture-backed company, so I could potentially get on that list. Or the EU-based manufacturing companies started by women, and I could get on that list with my whiteboard pen company based there. You can find lots and lots of these if you sort of take from your list, start searching Google and discover those results. You’ll use the same process you did here.

You know what the great thing about all three of these is? No tools required. You don’t have to pay for a single tool. You don’t have to worry about Domain Authority. You don’t have to worry about any sort of link qualification process or paying for something expensive. You can do this manually by yourself with Google as your only tool, and that will get you some of those first early links.

If you’ve got additional suggestions, please leave them down in the comments. I look forward to chatting with you there. We’ll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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First Month Free + No Charge Migration to a Faster WordPress Website

WordPress Made Fast and Easy

It’s been less than three months since we launched StudioPress Sites, our new solution that combines the ease of an all-in-one website builder with the flexible power of WordPress.

The response and feedback have been phenomenal. And the icing on the cake is that we’re already winning accolades.

In an independent speed test performed this month by WebMatros, StudioPress Sites was declared the undisputed winner. We’re thrilled, because we were up against formidable competition from WP Engine, Flywheel, Media Temple, Pressable, and Bluehost.

As you know, speed is important. If a page takes more than a couple of seconds to load, users will instantly hit the back button and move on.

But that’s only part of the story. Because unlike those other hosts, with StudioPress Sites you just sign up and quickly set up, without the usual hassles of self-hosted WordPress.

WordPress made fast and easy

The primary difference between a website builder and self-hosted WordPress is that with the former, you’re dealing with software as a service (SaaS), while the latter is … well, hosting. Not only is self-hosted WordPress a pain to deal with, it can also lead to unexpected surprises if you actually succeed (like your site crashing).

In this sense, StudioPress Sites is more like SaaS than hosting. You can set up your new site in just minutes on our server infrastructure that’s specifically optimized (and now independently tested) for peak WordPress performance.

From there, you simply select from 20 mobile-optimized HTML5 designs. Then, you choose from a library of trusted plugins for the functionality you need — and install them with one click.

Next, you put the included SEO tools to work, like our patented content analysis and optimization software, keyword research, advanced schema control, XML sitemap generation, robots.txt generation, asynchronous JavaScript loading, enhanced Open Graph output, breadcrumb title control, and AMP support.

There’s even more to StudioPress Sites than what I’ve highlighted here, but you can check out all the features at StudioPress.com. Let’s talk about the deal.

First month free, plus free migration

It’s really that simple. When you sign up for StudioPress Sites before 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time on April 28, 2017, you pay nothing for your first month.

On top of that, we’ll move you from your current WordPress site to your brand-new, easy-to-use, and blazingly fast StudioPress Site at no charge.

Why?

Because we know that moving your website can be a pain, even if you’re not happy with your current host. And just as importantly, because we want you to try StudioPress Sites risk free.

Fair enough?

Cool — head over to StudioPress to check it all out and sign up today.

NOTE: You must use that ^^^^ special link to get the deal!

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SearchCap: Google Image search change, WSJ first click free & new Google ad extensions

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

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Put *Them* First to Win Big

Put Them First to Win Big

Last week, we talked about how to really understand who is in your audience.

This week, we’re shifting into what kind of message they want and need from you. Brian kicked off on Monday with a piece of classic marketing advice (exemplified by a classic American comic film):

It’s not enough to just know your audience. You also need to put their interests and desires ahead of your own.

That might sound impossibly idealistic — but in fact, it’s pure pragmatism.

On Tuesday, Beth Hayden gave some specific thoughts on how to do it, by creating extraordinarily generous content that can open all kinds of doors for your business.

The Copyblogger FM podcast this week talks about your customer’s path to purchase and how to make it a little more appealing (and effective). I talk about the right places to ask for a sale and how you can discover what kinds of content to create.

In Wednesday’s post, I continued that theme of the content marketing path — taking a winding road through a new persuasion “formula” I’m calling ECUBED. I’d love your thoughts on how you’d tweak or add to that formula — drop by and leave a comment?

Catch you next week!

— Sonia Simone

Chief Content Officer, Rainmaker Digital


Catch up on this week’s content


if what you’re saying is wrong, it doesn’t matter how well you say itContent Marketing as Seduction

by Brian Clark


what could you give your ideal prospect that would really improve her life?3 Ways to Become More Generous and Grow Your Audience

by Beth Hayden


lots of sites are desperate for traffic. But traffic is just the start of the storyDon’t Get Flattened on the Attention Superhighway

by Sonia Simone


3 Content Marketing Strategy Fails (and How to Fix Them)3 Content Marketing Strategy Fails (and How to Fix Them)

by Sonia Simone


Enhance Your Freelance, with Jennifer BournEnhance Your Freelance, with Jennifer Bourn

by Brian Clark


How Screenwriter and ‘All Our Wrong Todays’ Author Elan Mastai Writes: Part OneHow Screenwriter and ‘All Our Wrong Todays’ Author Elan Mastai Writes: Part One

by Kelton Reid


A Crash Course in Copyright for CreatorsA Crash Course in Copyright for Creators

by Brian Clark


One Podcast, One Audience, or One Topic (Two Attempts)One Podcast, One Audience, or One Topic (Two Attempts)

by Jerod Morris & Jon Nastor


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3 Eye-Opening Techniques to Wake Up Your Readers with Your First Sentence

grab attention from the start

“I was only four years old when I saw my mother load up a washing machine for the very first time in her life …”

That is global health and data expert Hans Rosling’s opening line of a 2010 TED Talk, as he stands on stage with a bundle of laundry and a washing machine. Rosling does what the best presenters in the world excel at; in a matter of seconds, they get and keep your attention.

When you write content, your job is similar to someone standing on stage. Your readers are distracted and you have mere seconds to get their attention.

To grab and keep your audience’s attention, it’s best to use at least one attention-grabbing method that yanks your readers into your articles by creating intense curiosity.

Want to know three methods I recommend? Keep reading …

3 ways to hook your readers

In this article, I’ll present the following three attention-grabbing techniques, with examples of how they can be used in your content:

  • Method #1: Story of a demonstration
  • Method #2: Case study
  • Method #3: Opposing stance

Method #1: Story of a demonstration

Notice how this article started with a description of Hans Rosling standing on stage.

And what was he doing on stage? He was holding a bundle of laundry while standing next to a washing machine. He then proceeds to talk about the process of washing clothes. While he goes about the demonstration, your eyes are riveted to what he’s going to do next.

Rosling is lucky — he’s on stage and can do a physical demonstration. But when you write an article, you have to tell a story about a demonstration instead.

To do this, roll out your story as if the audience were watching and listening to find out what happens next. When you use a “demonstration” to start an article, the most mundane actions come to life.

Let’s say I wrote:

“Have you ever tried to peel a clove of garlic before? If you’ve done it the old-fashioned way, you’ve probably taken five minutes or more to separate the cloves, cut each clove in half, and peel off the skin. But what if you could peel the garlic in 10 seconds? Here’s what to do: Hit the garlic with the base of your palm so the cloves separate. Then take the separated cloves, put them in a container and cover it with another container. Then shake the heck out of the garlic and — like magic — the garlic is peeled.”

In the example above, you followed along, didn’t you?

Not only did you follow along, you wanted to know what came next.

When you use a story that involves a demonstration, you pull the reader through your content. Then once you’ve gotten to the end of your story, you simply connect it to the rest of your article.

Rosling’s washing machine demonstration may seem like a mundane example, but when placed at the start of an article, it forces you to follow along to find out what happens next.

A demonstration is only one way to get your readers’ attention. The second is a case study.

Method #2: Case study

Did you know Airbnb was suffering as a company until Barry Manilow’s drummer became a customer?

Sound interesting? Case studies — whether historical or current — attract readers because they want to know what happens next and why things unfolded the way they did.

Why was Airbnb in trouble in the first place? What’s the weird connection between Airbnb and Barry Manilow’s drummer? And how does all of this connect to the rest of the article?

As the Airbnb story goes, the founders were keen to offer accommodations similar to bed and breakfasts. That required the owner to be around when a guest arrived and stay in the house or apartment as well. But Barry Manilow’s drummer didn’t want just a room; he wanted an entire apartment.

That was a pivotal moment for Airbnb. And here’s the connection to the rest of the article:

We often formulate our own ideas when clients have much better suggestions for how we can run our businesses. By listening to their real customers, Airbnb found a way to offer lodging that has broad appeal.

See how the story got your attention? Remember how the washing machine demonstration kept you riveted?

Well, there’s one more method. It’s called the “opposing stance.”

Method #3: Opposing stance

An opposing stance is when you present an argument that seems to conflict with your own headline.

Let’s say you’re writing an article on “how to learn quickly.” In the first paragraph, you would offer a point of opposition.

You could deride “speed reading” and talk about how reading faster merely exposes you to more information, rather than creating a lasting understanding of the topic you’re reading about.

You’ll then explain that while slowing down and taking notes may seem time-consuming, it’s the most efficient way to retain what you’ve learned.

You teach your audience “how to learn quickly” — it’s just different from what they might be expecting to hear, so it wakes them up and gets them to focus on your content.

Keep your audience fascinated

Hans Rosling speaks about global health and data. They’re complex topics that audiences might have trouble connecting to, but Rosling’s speeches are adored by the public. And there’s a good reason why — he’ll use demonstrations, case studies, and even the power of opposition in a single speech.

He’ll start off with one concept, then move his way through the information and bring up the other elements — forcing you to pay rapt attention.

Great speakers know that the audience is restless. They know the previous speaker may have bored them out of their minds with graphs and endless facts and figures. That’s why they use stories, case studies, and opposition.

So, when you write, take a cue from a great speaker to keep your readers absorbed as you take them through the rest of your article.

Which attention-grabbing techniques do you use in your writing?

Share in the comments below.

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First appearance of ads in Local Pack found in UK mobile search result

The configuration showed three organic listings with one ad at the top.

The post First appearance of ads in Local Pack found in UK mobile search result appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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Rainmaker Rewind: Launching Your First (or Next) Digital Product

Rainmaker FM rewind

This week on Rainmaker Rewind, Sonia Simone explains the value of launching a digital product and the steps you should take to get moving.

Listen to Confessions of a Pink-haired Marketer to discover how digital products can help boost your income and the nitty-gritty of designing your first digital product with your audience in mind.

And, as always, be sure to check out the other great episodes that recently aired on Rainmaker FM.

  1. Confessions of a Pink-haired Marketer. Sonia Simone talks about why you should consider launching a digital product and what it can do for your business: Launching Your First (or Next) Digital Product
  2. The Digital Entrepreneur. Entrepreneur and Rainmaker FM host Chris Ducker joins Jerod Morris to discuss going after what you want and building your business: How to Market Like a Magnet and Build Your Personal Brand
  3. Copyblogger FM. Sonia Simone tackles this week’s hottest trend, Pokémon Go, and the growing world of augmented reality: Pokémon Go: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
  4. Elsewhere. Glenn Leibowitz of Write With Impact welcomed Brian Clark to his show to chat about the entrepreneur’s journey and building a successful business: Brian Clark on Write With Impact
  5. Hack the Entrepreneur. Jon Nastor interviews Nathan Hirsch about setting goals and organizing priorities when it comes to your business: Prioritizing and Getting Things Done
  6. The Missing Link. Jabez LeBret answers your burning questions about all things LinkedIn: Ask Us Anything (LinkedIn Edition), Part One
  7. The Writer Files. Kelton Reid is back with part two of last week’s interview with neuroscientist Michael Grybko: How Neuroscientist Michael Grybko Defines Writer’s Block: Part Two
  8. Youpreneur. Chris Ducker dives into his personal strategy for facing doubts and how small goals can help you boost confidence: How to Kick The You-Know-What Out of Entrepreneurial Self-Doubt
  9. The Showrunner. Jerod Morris and Jon Nastor discuss the three activities they each regard as priorities in their schedules and share their personal lessons learned while starting and growing numerous podcasts: The Showrunner’s Dilemma
  10. Zero to Book. Pamela Wilson and Jeff Goins navigate the world of designing and printing your self-published book: How to Get Your Book Printed (2 Phenomenal Options, 1 Terrible One)

And, one more thing …

If you want to get Rainmaker Rewind sent straight to your favorite podcast player, subscribe right here on Rainmaker FM.

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World’s First Solar Powered Airport




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The southern city of Kochi is now the proud home of the first airport in the world solar energy.

On August 18, the Cochin International Airport Limited (CIAL) -India international largest in terms of passenger traffic to any ordered 12 megawatts (MW) of solar projects fourth airport. The airport already had a solar power plant of 1 MW, which can produce 4000 units of electricity per day.

With its new solar power station, the airport can now produce 60,000 units of electricity per day, which is more than enough to meet their daily needs.

“We initiated a pilot project in February 2013 as part of our plan to shift to renewable energy by setting up a 100 kilo watt unit,” VJ Kurian, managing director of CIAL told Quartz in a telephone interview. “When we found that feasible, we set up a 1MW unit in November 2013.”

“We did not want to be identified as just another airport and be confined to it,” Kurian added.

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