Tag Archive | "David"

Business Intelligence: If only more of our customers were like Larry David

We can’t read customers’ minds, but we can listen attentively to their complaints because they are valuable customer intelligence. It might not matter to us, but if it matters to them it is important. And understanding what customers are thinking is vital to a brand’s success.

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How Journalist and Bestselling Author of ‘The Revenge of Analog’ David Sax Writes: Part Two

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The business and culture journalist and bestselling author of the recent book The Revenge of Analog, David Sax, dropped by the show to talk about the writing life, the importance of real things in a digital world, and the revenge of paper.

David is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in Bloomberg Businessweek, The New York Times, The New Yorker online, and other publications.

The author’s first book, Save the Deli, was a Los Angeles Times bestseller and won the James Beard Award for Writing and Literature.

His latest, The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter “… looks at the resurgence of analog goods and ideas, during a time when we assumed digital would conquer all.” It was longlisted for the 2017 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence.

Kevin Kelly, founding editor of Wired magazine and author of The Inevitable, said of the book, “The better digital gets, the more important analog becomes … Sax’s reporting is eye-opening and mind-changing.”

NOTE: This is the last episode of the year for us, due to the impending holiday break, but we will return with more great interviews for you in 2017. Thanks for listening!

If you’re a fan of The Writer Files, please click subscribe to automatically see new interviews.

In Part Two of this file David Sax and I discuss:

  • Why you should work regular hours, and the author’s “Cinderella Clause”
  • The significance of unplugging for writers
  • How to record your audiobook in the same studio as Drake
  • Why the reward is the work for sustaining your writing

Listen to this Episode Now

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How Journalist and Bestselling Author of ‘The Revenge of Analog’ David Sax Writes: Part One

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The business and culture journalist and bestselling author of the recent book The Revenge of Analog, David Sax, dropped by the show to talk about the writing life, the importance of real things in a digital world, and the revenge of paper.

David is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in Bloomberg Businessweek, The New York Times, The New Yorker online, and other publications.

The author’s first book, Save the Deli, was a Los Angeles Times bestseller and won the James Beard Award for Writing and Literature.

His latest, The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter “… looks at the resurgence of analog goods and ideas, during a time when we assumed digital would conquer all.” It was longlisted for the 2017 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence.

Kevin Kelly, founding editor of Wired magazine and author of The Inevitable, said of the book, “The better digital gets, the more important analog becomes … Sax’s reporting is eye-opening and mind-changing.”

If you’re a fan of The Writer Files, please click subscribe to automatically see new interviews.

In Part One of this file David Sax and I discuss:

  • Writing at the intersections of business and culture
  • Why your best ideas come to you in the shower
  • The importance of impeccable research for great nonfiction
  • A road map for cranking out 3,000–4,000 words a day
  • How printing and editing your work on paper can improve your writing

Listen to this Episode Now

The post How Journalist and Bestselling Author of ‘The Revenge of Analog’ David Sax Writes: Part One appeared first on Copyblogger.


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It’s Your Duty to Design the Life You Want, with David Kadavy

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Many people go out on their own in pursuit of the perfect lifestyle. Of course, “perfect” is entirely subjective.

Maybe it’s to become a digital nomad and travel the world. For others, it’s the freedom to work from home and be closer to family. And still others are chasing audacious goals and world domination.

All is well and good until you find that your business is now running you instead of the other way around. It happens all too often, and all too easily.

Today’s episode is all about refocusing on your priorities and getting back on the path to your perfect life. Our guest is David Kadavy, who like a lot of Unemployable types has multiple sources of income that have allowed him to relocate to South America and live the unconventional life he desires.

Listen to this Episode Now

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How to Create Courses to Monetize Your Brand, with David Siteman Garland

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In this episode of Youpreneur FM, Chris Ducker sits down with mediapreneur David Siteman Garland to talk about online course creation.

With the rise of content marketing in the last few years, the amount of information you can find online has been growing exponentially. You no longer have to pay for most information — it’s available for free, and it’s only a few clicks away.

So, does this mean that selling info-products is dead? Not at all. The key is finding very specific problems that your audience has and offering specific solutions. The concept of selling access instead of just information is an important element too.

Today, I talk with David Siteman Garland about building awesome online courses — and becoming very profitable at it. Get ready to take notes, because this episode is jam-packed with specific, actionable advice.

David delivered some great insights into how he made his online course such a huge success. In fact, this episode is a perfect illustration of what he is talking about: provide amazingly valuable information and people will want more!

In this 57-minute episode, David and I discuss:

  • The earning potential of having your own online course to offer
  • How to create a survey to understand your audience’s needs
  • Testing your content before developing a course
  • The biggest myths of course creation and marketing
  • Why you shouldn’t be using YouTube to host your course content
  • How to market your course, the non-sleazy way

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10 Ways to Piss Off David Ogilvy (Free Poster)

tip of the day - don't make David mad

You won’t like David when he’s angry.

Sure, he may be a gentleman with brains, but this English oven salesman turned chef turned farmer turned advertising giant has a temper.

For example, when he sat down to write only to find he had no ideas, he said, “I get bad-tempered. If my wife comes into my room I growl at her. (This has gotten worse since I gave up smoking.)”

In a note to the heads of his offices before planned visits he wrote, “Waiting for food puts me in a foul mood.”

But it seems he reserved his strongest moments of outrage for advertising.

Advertising themes that demand your attention

Over the course of a career that spanned 50 years and $ 100 million worth of advertising, David developed some firm views on the discipline. In fact, David repeated them so often in his lectures, interviews, and memos, you might call them themes.ogilvy-copywriting-crimes-small

Themes he wanted infused into his agency’s corporate culture.

Violate one of these themes and you just might find yourself on the receiving end of a stern memo or handwritten note scribbled on a scrap of paper from David.

In this online age (where brevity rules the roost), these themes still demand our attention.

And since the editor of The Unpublished David Ogilvy said David was fond of lists, what better way to share these copywriting crimes that angered Mr. Ogilvy than with a list?

Enjoy.

1. Be boring

The worst fault a salesman can commit is to be a bore.

– From a 1935 guide a 24-year-old David Ogilvy wrote for the entire staff of Aga Cooker salesmen.

More than fifty years later, at the age of 76, Ogilvy was asked in an interview, “What bugs you?” He replied:

Bores. Above all bores. I think boring is the ultimate sin.

2. Sling mud at competitors

On no account sling mud — it can carry very little weight, coming from you, and it will make the prospect distrust your integrity and dislike you.

– From a 1935 guide a 24-year-old David Ogilvy wrote for the entire staff of Aga Cooker salesmen.

3. Write copy that lacks charm

It plods. Heavy as lead. The models — most of them — look like automobile dealers from South Dakota.

– From a note to Cliff Field, a creative director at Ogilvy & Mather, June 11, 1965.

4. Break a promise

Joel: I thought you promised to show me the Sears ads (with copy) last Tuesday. It is now three months since Struthers picked them. Longer than the period of gestation in pigs.

– From a handwritten note to Joel Raphaelson (circa 1964).

5. Use jargon

A brand manager who recently left told the agency that he was pursuing a policy of PRE-EMPTIVE DIMENSIONALIZATION OF BETTERMENT.

– To Alex Biel, former Executive Director of The Ogilvy Center for Research & Development.

6. Be a weasel merchant

We abhor buck passers, and people who don’t tell the truth.

– From a 1960 Christmas talk to staff members. (Weasel merchants are companies and advertisers who stretch the truth to sell.)

7. Feature self-justifying research

We all have a tendency to use research as a drunkard uses a lamppost — for support, but not for illumination.

– From David’s talk to the National Industrial Conference Board, April 1961.

8. Write copy that fails to make the cash register ring

As a copywriter, what I want from the researchers is to be told what kind of advertising will make the cash register ring.

– From the 50th Anniversary Luncheon of the Advertising Research Foundation, March 18, 1986.

9. Demonstrate incompetence in the advertising business

I look at an ad or commercial, all too many of the commercials in fact, and I say that is just an incompetent piece of work. The guy doesn’t know what he is doing.

– From an interview in Ogilvy & Mather’s quarterly employee publication ‘Viewpoint,’ circa 1986, when Ogilvy was 76.

10. Be an obstinate creative person

Creative people who refuse to study the product or the research or to admit there’s more than one way to skin the cat.

– From an interview in Ogilvy & Mather’s quarterly employee publication ‘Viewpoint,’ circa 1986, when Ogilvy was 76.

Want a poster of these copywriting crimes?

PDF Poster: Download the PDF poster of these copywriting crimes (627 KB), suitable for printing and hanging near your workspace when you need to see it most.

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Embed this graphic on your own site

Shareable Graphic: If you’d prefer to publish the image of these copywriting crimes on your own site, we’ve also got a Copyblogger Shareable for you …

Copy and paste the following code into your blog post or web page:


The single best way to honor David Ogilvy?

Behave as if he’s looking over your shoulder.

About the author

Demian Farnworth

Demian Farnworth is Copyblogger Media’s Chief Content Writer. Follow him on Twitter or The Copybot. In the meantime, subscribe to his podcast: Rough Draft

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David Siteman Garland on the Infinite Scalability of Online Courses

It’s the ultimate Internet dream: create something once that sells over and over again, even while you sleep. And what better product than information itself?

Turns out, it’s not that easy for the idle dreamer. And often, Internet entrepreneurs work 16-hour days in order to “make money while they sleep.”

The good news is that the dream has shifted. Instead of hucksters offering “no work Internet cash machine” models to gullible business opportunity types, the concept of an “online business” has become a viable thing that experienced professionals and committed entrepreneurs explore and attain as part of the legitimate business world.

David Siteman Garland discovered this for himself thanks to his popular podcast, The Rise to the Top. He was constantly asked by his audience for the secret to creating a popular and profitable show, and David’s answer was always the same — it’s the art of the interview. So he created a course on the topic, and the rest (including his podcast!) is history.

In this 35-minute episode David Siteman Garland and I discuss:

  • His non-entrepreneurial path to online business
  • How he decided to build The Rise to The Top
  • The continuing rise of the mediapreneur
  • Why you don’t need to produce new content forever
  • Why he quit his incredibly popular podcast
  • The power of the podcast interview format
  • The infinite scalability of online courses
  • His very best advice on creating an awesome interview
  • How to start developing your own online courses

Click Here to Listen to Rainmaker FM Episode No. 20

Or, grab it in iTunes.

Image by Tim Mossholder

About the author

Brian Clark

Brian Clark is founder and CEO of Copyblogger, host of Rainmaker.FM, and evangelist for the Rainmaker Platform. Get more from Brian on Twitter.

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David Ogilvy’s Prophetic “Secret Weapon” of Selling

Almost forty years ago, storied ad man David Ogilvy sat down in an office somewhere in India and recorded a little film confessing the — as he put it — “secret weapon” of advertising that actually works.

It was a hot day, so he took off his jacket, exposing his infamous red suspenders. Ogilvy spoke simply and directly to his audience on the other side of the camera.

The prophecy he uttered in that grainy 7-minute film all those years ago has come to pass, with a bullet.

Though visionary, Ogilvy could not have imagined just how powerful his “secret weapon” would become in the age of the Internet, or how it would ultimately be wielded by individuals building media companies with nothing more than a laptop and sufficient quantities of research and sweat.

Watch the grand old man below. Make the connection between Ogilvy’s 80-year-old secret and the principles we talk about around here week in and week out.

There is nothing new under the sun, we only need the humility and intelligence to correctly apply the proven wisdom and strategy that has come before us …

Ladies and Gentlemen, I envy you. For forty years, I’ve been a voice crying in the wilderness. Today, my first love is coming to its own. You face a golden future. ~ David Ogilvy

About the author

Robert Bruce

Robert Bruce is VP of Marketing for Copyblogger Media, as well as its Resident Recluse.

The post David Ogilvy’s Prophetic “Secret Weapon” of Selling appeared first on Copyblogger.

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What One of the World’s Great Novelists Learned About Writing from David Ogilvy

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Salman Rushdie is one of our greatest living novelists.

His novel, Midnight’s Children, won the Man Booker Prize in 1981, and in 2008 the novel was named the Best of the Bookers, the best Booker winning novel since the prizes’ inception.

However, before Sir  Salman Rushdie was a famous, knighted novelist, he was a copywriter under the suspender-wearing, direct marketing pioneer, David Ogilvy. Yes, that’s right. The great novelist learned from the great copywriter.

What do copywriting and creative writing have in common? Some would say, “Nothing.” It’s easy to look at Rushdie’s time at Ogilvy and Mather’s London office as his period of “working for the man” while he wrote his novels.

However, the lessons Rushdie learned as a copywriter were essential to his development as a novelist, and the fact that Rushdie wrote Midnight’s Children  on the off hours from his copywriting job shows that maybe he should never have quit?

Let’s explore these lessons about effective writing from novelist and copywriter Salman Rushdie.

1. Spend an inordinate amount of time on headlines

While finishing Midnight’s Children, Rushdie reportedly spent several hours at the office trying to choose the novel’s title, even resorting to typing his two finalists “Children of Midnight” and “Midnight’s Children” over and over.

Today, we’re inundated with titles and headlines.

Everywhere you go online, from Facebook, to Twitter, to your email inbox, someone is trying to grab your attention with a compelling headline. If you want your blog post or book to have a chance, you need to spend time making sure your titles are both clear and engaging.

Salman Rushdie knew how important the title of his book was, and spent hours debating which to choose.

How long are you spending working on your headlines?

2. Panic your way to success

Imagine it’s your job to convey the taste of a chocolate bar in just one word. And by the way, you’re not going to get paid for, “Delicious.”

This was the situation Rushdie was in one afternoon when a panicking co-worker asked him to brainstorm a new slogan for Aero, a British candy bar filled with air bubbles. As they batted around ideas, the unthinkable happened. The client called unexpectedly, demanding results.

This particular co-worker, according to Rushdie, “Had a tendency, when he was panicking, to sweat profusely and to begin to stammer, also extensively.” When the client asked him to do something, he said, “It’s impossib-ib-ib-ible.”

Rushdie says the light went on. “While he was still on the phone sweating and stammering, I wrote down every word I could think of that ended with ‘able’ or ‘ible’ and turned it into ‘bubble’.” Rushdie ended up with “Irresistibubble,” which is still Aero’s slogan, over 30 years later.

Panic can be an excellent tool for creativity. Here are a two easy ways to summon panic in your creative process:

  1. Become accountable: While Rushdie had the benefit of a client on the other end of the phone and a boss like David Ogilvy looking over his shoulder, bloggers don’t always have people to hold them accountable. However, you do have your audience, and you can always imagine them sitting at their computers, waiting for you to publish your next post, and wondering what’s taking so long. Are they really doing that? Probably not, but we can hope, right?
  2. Set Deadlines: When I used Feedburner as my email subscription service, my post had to be finished by 11 every morning or it wouldn’t be emailed to subscribers until the next day. At 10:55, I sometimes found myself in a nervous sweat, rushing to finish my post. I could have easily changed the setting to a later time, but I left it because it forced me into a panic that fueled my productivity. Want to force yourself to write faster? Why not tweak your subscription settings to set a deadline of your own?

3. Make a big statement with few words

At the 2008 IAPI Advertising Effectiveness Award ceremony, Rushdie said:

One of the great things about advertising is you have to say a lot in very little. You have to try to make a very big statement in very few words or very few images and you haven’t much time. All of that is, I feel, very, very useful.

Short, simple sentences work. In fact, simplicity actually makes you sound smarter because your readers will actually understand what you’re saying.

You may think it’s more difficult to write complex sentences with five-syllable words. In reality, one sign of a master is to communicate much in just a few words.

(Of course, if Rushdie had worked for Ogilvy a little longer, he may have cut a few of those “very’s.”)

4. Great (copy)writing is a job

While Rushdie certainly was a strong writer before he began working at Ogilvy and Mather, his career as a copywriter taught him the tough discipline he needed to succeed as a writer. He says says:

I write like a job. I sit down in the morning and I do it. I don’t miss deadlines. I do feel that a lot of the professional craft of writing is something I learnt from those years in advertising and I’ll always be grateful for it.

With writing, I don’t believe in talent. Instead, you are either practiced or not.

Whether you’re a six-figure copywriter or someone who blogs for fun, if you want to become a better writer, treat it like your job.

5. Don’t give into rejection

When Rushdie was assigned an ad for Fresh Cream Cakes, the client rejected his tagline, “Naughty. But Nice.”  However, a year later, after he’d moved onto writing fiction full time, his tagline was everywhere in the U.K., including billboards and television.

Rushdie, didn’t let rejection stop him, and when his first novel was rejected by publishers, it motivated him to grow as a writer. As he says in a recent interview:

It took me a long time to learn to be a writer. One must find themselves an editor or, failing that, a group of people who will tell you the truth about your writing, and are not afraid to say, ‘This really isn’t good enough.’ … Unless someone can tell you that what you’re writing is no good, then you won’t know how to push it to a point when it can start being good.

What creative writing and copywriting have in common

Before Salman Rushdie worked for David Ogilvy, he was a poor, out of work actor. By the time he quit copywriting, he was a published novelist about to release one of the most celebrated books of the 20th century.

It’s easy to think of commercial writing and creative writing as two different worlds, but Rushdie shows us the lines between the two are much more blurry than one might think. Both are about presenting your readers with new opportunities and transforming the way  they see the world.

If you’re a creative writer, perhaps you need to give copywriting a try. If it worked for Salman Rushdie, it might just work for you.

What have you learned about writing from copywriting?

About the Author: Joe Bunting lives and writes at the foothills of the Appalachians. He is the founder of The Write Practice, the online creative writing workbook, and the Story Cartel Course, an online class that helps creative writers build their online platform. You can follow him on Twitter.

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How to Newsjack Your Way to Free Media Exposure with David Meerman Scott

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What if getting big PR and media exposure for your business or idea were no longer out of your reach or budget?

What if you could “inject” your name or brand into a national or international story of your choosing, becoming part of the story yourself?

David Meerman Scott, a veteran PR and marketing expert, has written a book that teaches you how to accomplish that, and more.

Enter Newsjacking, a powerful way to get seen and heard in today’s big media environment…

In this episode, David Meerman Scott and I discuss:

  • How a single blog post brought one company $ 1,000,000 in sales
  • How to become a Newsjacker with a blog and Twitter
  • What your website must look like in the near future
  • Where journalists are desperately looking for content
  • 3 Newsjacking case studies you can use right away
  • The main goal of Newsjacking and how to achieve it

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The Show Notes:

About the Author: Robert Bruce is Copyblogger Media’s copywriter and resident recluse.

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