Tag Archive | "Behavior"

Gift-giving shopping behavior from religious holidays to relationships and beyond

New research analyzes data and trends from last year’s holiday season to bring you key insights to help you optimize your campaigns.



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Digital Marketing News: Behavior & Analytics Studies, Facebook’s A/B Testing, & LinkedIn’s Carousel Ads

Perceived Influence Marketing Charts Graph

Perceived Influence Marketing Charts Graph

As Concerns Grow Over Internet Privacy, Most Say Search & Social Have Too Much Power
How Internet users perceive the influence a variety of popular online platforms have over their lives was among the subjects examined in a sizable new joint report by Ipsos, the Internet Society, and the Centre for International Governance Innovation, offering some surprising insight for digital marketers. Marketing Charts

Facebook Experiments with A/B Testing for Page Posts
Facebook has been trying out A/B testing of Facebook Page posts, a feature that if rolled out in earnest could eventually have significant implications for digital marketers. Social Media Today

CMOs Say Digital Marketing Is Most Effective: Nielsen Study
Accurately measuring digital marketing advertising spending’s return on investment remains a challenge, while the overall effectiveness of digital ad spend has grown, according to a fascinating new Nielsen study of chief marketing officers. Broadcasting & Cable

Snapchat Rolls Out Option to ‘Unsend’ Messages, New eCommerce Tools
Snapchat has added several e-commerce tools including an in-app ticket purchase solution, branded augmented-reality games, and has given its users the option to unsend messages. Social Media Today

People Are Changing the Way They Use Social Media
Trust of various social media platforms and how Internet users’ self-censorship has changed since 2013 are among the observations presented in the results of a broad new study conducted by The Atlantic. The Atlantic

Facebook launches tool to let users rate advertisers’ customer service
Facebook has added a feedback tool that lets users rate and review advertisers’ customer service, feedback the company says will help it find and even ban sellers with poor ratings. Marketing Land

2018 June 15 Statistics Image

Google’s about-face on GDPR consent tool is monster win for ad-tech companies
Google reversed its General Data Protection Regulation course recently, allowing publishers to work with an unlimited number of vendors, presenting new opportunities for advertising technology firms. AdAge

LinkedIn rolls out Sponsored Content carousel ads that can include up to 10 customized, swipeable cards
LinkedIn (client) has rolled out a variety of new ad types and more performance metrics for marketers, with its Sponsored Content carousel ads that allow up to 10 custom images. Marketing Land

Report: Facebook is Primary Referrer For Lifestyle Content, Google Search Dominates Rest
What people care about and where they look for relevant answers online are among the marketing-related insights revealed in a recent report from Web analytics firm Parse.ly. Facebook was many users’ go-to source for answers for lifestyle content, while Google was the top source for all other content types. MediaPost

Survey: 87% of mobile marketers see success with location targeting
Location targeting is widely-used and has performed well in the mobile marketing realm, helping increase conversion rates and how well marketers understand their audiences, according to new report data. Marketing Land

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE:

Marketoonist Short-Termism Cartoon

A lighthearted look at marketing short-termism, by Marketoonist Tom Fishburne — Marketoonist

‘The weird one wins’: MailChimp’s CMO on the company’s off-the-wall advertising — The Drum

TOPRANK MARKETING & CLIENTS IN THE NEWS:

  • Lee Odden — Why Content Marketing is Good for B2B Companies — Atomic Reach
  • Lee Odden — Top 2018 Influencers That Might Inspire Your Inner Marketer — Whatagraph
  • Lee Odden — Better than Bonuses: 4 Motivators that Matter More than Money — Workfront
  • Anne Leuman — What’s Trending: Marketing GOOOOOAAAALS! — LinkedIn (client)

Thanks for visiting, and please join us next week for a new selection of the latest digital marketing news, and in the meantime you can follow us at @toprank on Twitter for even more timely daily news. Also, don’t miss the full video summary on our TopRank Marketing TV YouTube Channel.

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SearchCap: ASCI rankings, featured snippet quiz & consumer behavior

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: ASCI rankings, featured snippet quiz & consumer behavior appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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SearchCap: Pinterest Lens, SEO budgets & reviews user behavior

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

The post SearchCap: Pinterest Lens, SEO budgets & reviews user behavior appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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The Shifts In Consumer Behavior Driving Google’s Maturation

Columnist Nathan Safran takes a look at where Google is heading — and what challenges it faces — in the age of mobile.

The post The Shifts In Consumer Behavior Driving Google’s Maturation appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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How Google May Use Searcher, Usage, & Clickstream Behavior to Impact Rankings – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish

A recent patent from Google suggests a new kind of influence in the rankings that has immense implications for marketers. In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand discusses what it says, what that means, and adds a twist of his own to get us thinking about where Google might be heading.

How Google May Use Their Knowledge of Surfer & Searcher Behavior to Impact the Rankings - Whiteboard Friday

For reference, here’s a still of this week’s whiteboard. Click on it to open a high resolution image in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week let’s chat about some things that Google is learning about web searchers and web surfers that may be impacting the rankings.

I was pretty psyched to see a patent a few weeks ago that had been granted actually to Google, so filed a while before that. That patent came from Navneet Panda who, as many in the SEO space may remember, is also the engineer for whom Panda, the Panda Update from Google, is named after. Bill Slawski did a great analysis of the patent on his website, and you can check that out, along with some of the other patent diagrams themselves. Patents can be a little confusing and weird, especially the language, but this one had some surprising clarity to it and some potentially obvious applications for web marketers too.

Deciphering searcher intent

So, in this case, Googlebot here — I’ve anthropomorphized him, my Googlebot there, nicely — is thinking about the queries that are being performed in Google search engine and basically saying, “Huh, if I see lots of people searching for things like ‘find email address,’ ‘email address tool,’ ‘email finder,’ and then I also see a lot of search queries similar to those but with an additional branded element, like ‘VoilaNorbert email tool’ or ‘Norbert email finder’ or ‘how to find email Norbert,’ or even things like ‘email site:voilanorbert.com,’” Googlebot might actually say, “Hmm, lots of searchers who look for these kinds of queries seem to be also looking for this particular brand.”

You can imagine this in tons and tons of ways. Lots of people searching for restaurants also search for Yelp. Lots of people searching for hotels also add in queries like “Trip Advisor.” Lots of people searching for homes to buy also add in Zillow. These brands that essentially get known and combined and perform very well in these non-branded searches, one of the ways that Google might be thinking about that is because they see a lot of branded search that includes the unbranded words around that site.

Google’s site quality patent

In Panda’s site quality patent — and Navneet Panda wasn’t the only author on this patent, but one of the ones we recognize — what’s described is essentially that this algorithm, well not algorithm, very simplistic equation. I’m sure much more than simplistic than what Google’s actually using if they are actually using this. Remember, when it comes to patents, they usually way oversimplify that type of stuff because they don’t want to get exactly what they’re doing out there in the public. But they have this equation that looks like this: Number of unique searchers for the brand or keyword X — so essentially, this is kind of a searches, searchers. They’re trying to identify only unique quantities of people doing it, looking at things like IP address and device and location and all of that to try and identify just the unique people who are performing this — divided by the number of unique searches for the non-branded version.

So branded divided by non-branded equals some sort of site quality score for keyword X. If a lot more people are performing a search for “Trip Advisor + California vacations” than are performing searches for just “California vacations,” then the site quality score for Trip Advisor when it comes to the keyword “California vacations” might be quite high.

You can imagine that if we take another brand — let’s say a brand that folks are less familiar with, WhereToGoInTheWorld.com — and there’s very, very few searches for that brand plus “California vacations,” and there’s lots of searches for the unbranded version, the site quality score for WhereToGoInTheWorld.com is going to be much lower. I don’t even think that’s a real website, but regardless.

Rand’s theory

Now, I want to add one more wrinkle on to this. I think one of the things that struck me as being almost obvious but not literally mentioned in this specific patent was my theory that this also applies to clickstream data. You can see this happening obviously already in personalization, personalized search, but I think it might be happening in non-personalized search as well, and that is essentially through Android and through Chrome, which I’ve drawn these lovely logos just for you. Google knows basically where everyone goes on the web and what everyone does on the web. They see this performance.

So they can look and see the clickstream for a lot of people’s process is a searcher goes and searches for “find email address tool,” and then they find this resource from Distilled and Distilled mentions Rob Ousbey’s account — I think it was from Rob Ousbey that that original resource came out — and they follow him and then they follow me and they see that I tweeted about VoilaNorbert. Voila, they make it to VoilaNorbert.com’s website, where their search ends. They’re no longer looking for this information. They’ve now found a source that sort of answers their desire, their intent. Google might go, “Huh, you know, why not just rank this? Why rank this one when we could just put this there? Because this seems to be the thing that is answering the searcher’s problem. It’s taking care of their issue.”

So what does this mean for us?

This is tough for marketers. I think both of these, the query formatting and the potential clickstream uses, suggest a world in which building up your brand association and building up the stream of traffic to your website that’s solving a problem not just for searchers, but for potential searchers and people with that issue, whether they search or not, is part of SEO. I think that’s going to mean that things like branding and things like attracting traffic from other sources, from social, from email, from content, from direct, from offline, and word-of-mouth, that all of those things are going to become part of the SEO equation. If we don’t do those things well, in the long term, we might do great SEO, kind of classic, old-school keywords and links and crawl and rankings SEO and miss out on this important piece that’s on the rise.

I’m looking forward to some great comments and your theories as well. We’ll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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The Future of User Behavior – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by willcritchlow

In the early days of search, Google used only your typed query to find the most relevant results. We’re now increasingly seeing SERPs that are influenced by all kinds of contextual information — the implicit queries.

In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Will Critchlow covers what exactly that means and how it might explain why we see “(not provided)” in our analytics more often than we’d like.









PRO Tip: Learn more about how Google ranks pages at Moz Academy.

For reference, here’s a still image of this week’s whiteboard:

Video Transcription

Hi, Moz fans. I’m Will Critchlow, one of the founders of Distilled, and I want to talk today about the future of user behavior, something that I’ve been talking about a MozCon this year. In particular, I want to talk about the implications of query enhancement. So I’m going to start by telling you what we mean by this phrase.

Old-school query, key phrase, this is what we’ve talked about for a long time. In SEO, something like “London tube stations,” a bunch of words strung together, that’s the entire query, and we would call it a query or a key phrase. But we’ve been defining this what we call the “new query” made up of two parts. The explicit query here in blue is London tube stations, again, in this example, exactly the same. What we’re calling the “implicit query” is essentially all of the other information that the search engine knows about you, and this what they know about you in general, what they know about you at this specific moment in time, and what they know about your recent history and any other factors they want to factor in.

So, in this particular case, I’ve said this is an iPhone user, they’re on the street, they’re in London. You can imagine how this information changes the kind of thing that you might be looking for when you perform a query like this or indeed any other.

This whole model is something that we’ve been kind of building out and thinking about a lot this year. Tom Anthony, one of my colleagues in London, presented this at a conference, and we’ve been working on it together. We came up with this kind of visual representation of what we think is happening over time. As people get used to this behavior, they see it in the search results, and they adapt to the information that they’re receiving back from the search engine.

So old school search results where everybody’s search result was exactly the same, if they performed a particular query, no matter where in the world they were, wherever in the country they were, whatever device they were on, whatever time of day it was, whatever their recent history, everybody’s was the same. In other words, the only information that the search engine is taking into account in this case is the old-style query, the explicit part.

Then, what we’ve seen is that there’s gradually been this implicit query information being added on top. You may not be able to see it from my brilliant hand-drawn diagram here, but my intention is that these blue bars are the same height out to here. So, at this point, there’s all of the explicit query information being passed over. In other words, I’m doing the same kind of search I’ve always done. But Google is taking into account this extra, implicit information about me, what it knows about me, what it knows about my device, what it knows about my history and so forth. Therefore, Google has more information here than they did previously. They can return better results.

That’s kind of what we’ve been talking about for a long time, I think, this evolution of better search results based on the additional information that the search engines have about us. But what we’re starting to see and what we’re certainly predicting is going to become more and more prevalent is that as the implicit information that search engines have grows, and, in particular, as their ability to use that information intelligently improves, then we’re actually going to see users start to give less explicit information over. In other words, they’re going to trust that the search engines are going to pull out the implicit information that they need. So I can do a much shorter, simpler query.

But what you see here is, again, to explain my hand-drawn diagram in case it’s not perfectly beautiful, the blue bars are declining here. In other words, I’m sending less and less explicit information over as time goes along. But actually, the total information that search engines have to work with, as time goes on, is actually increasing, because the implicit information they’re gathering is growing faster than the explicit information is declining.

I can give you a concrete example of this. So I vividly remember giving a talk about keyword research, and it was a few years ago. I was kind of mocking that business owner. We’ve all met these business owners who want to rank for the one-word key phrase. So I want to rank for restaurant or whatever. I say, “This is ridiculous. What in the world can you imagine somebody is possibly looking for when they do a search of ‘restaurant.’ ”

Back then, if you did a search like that, you got a kind of weird mix, because this is back in these days when there essentially no implicit information being taken in. You’ve got a mix of the most powerful websites of actual restaurants anywhere in your country plus some news, like a powerful page on a big domain, those kinds of things. Probably a Wikipedia entry. Why would a business owner want to rank for that stuff? That’s going to convert horribly poorly.

But my mind was changed powerfully when I caught myself. I was in Boston, and I caught myself doing a search for “breakfast.” I went to Google, typed in “breakfast,” hit Search. What was I thinking? What exactly was I hoping the outcome was going to be here? Well, actually, I’ve trained myself to believe that all of this other implicit information is going to be taken into account, and, in fact, it was. So, instead of getting that old-style Wikipedia entry, a news result, a couple of random restaurants from somewhere in the country, I got a local pack, and I got some local Boston news articles on the top 10 places to have breakfast in Boston. It was all customized to my exact location, so I got some stuff that was really near me, and I found a great place to have breakfast just around the corner from the hotel. So that worked.

I’ve actually noticed myself doing this more and more, and I imagine, given obviously the industry I work in, I’m pretty much an early adopter here. But I think we’re going to see all users adopt this style of searching more and more, and it’s really going to change how we as marketers have to think, because it doesn’t mean that you need to go out there and rank for the generic keyword “breakfast.” But it does mean that you need to take into account all of the possible ways that people might be searching for these things and the various different ways that Google might piece together a useful search result when somebody gives them such apparently unhelpful explicit information, in particular, obviously, in this case, local.

I kind of mentioned “not provided” down here. This is my one, I guess, non-
conspiracy theory view of what could be going on with the whole not provided thing, which is that actually, if Google’s model is looking more and more like this and less like this, and, in particular, as we get further over to this end, and of course, you can consider something like Google Now would be the extreme of this where is in fact no blue bar and pure orange, then actually the reliance on keywords goes away. Maybe the not provided thing is actually more of a strategic message for Google, kind of saying, “We’re not necessarily thinking in terms of keywords anymore. We’re thinking in terms of your need at a given moment in time.”

So, anyway, I hope that’s been a useful kind of rapid-fire run through over what I think is going to happen as people get used to the power of query enhancement. I’m Will Critchlow. Until next time, thanks.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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