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5 Google Business Profile Tweaks To Improve Foot Traffic

Posted by MiriamEllis

Your agency recommends all kinds of useful tactics to help improve the local SEO for your local business clients, but how many of those techniques are leveraging Google Business Profile (GBP) to attract as many walk-ins as possible?

Today, I’m sharing five GBP tweaks worthy of implementation to help turn digital traffic into foot traffic. I’ve ordered them from easiest to hardest, but as you’ll see, even the more difficult ones aren’t actually very daunting — all the more reason to try them out!

1) Answer Google Q&A quickly (they might be leads)

Difficulty level: Easy

If you have automotive industry clients, chances you’re familiar with Greg Gifford from DealerOn. At a recent local search conference, Greg shared that 40 percent of the Google Q&A questions his clients receive are actually leads

40 percent!

Here’s what that looks like in Google’s Q&A:

It looks like Coast Nissan has a customer who is ready to walk through the door if they receive an answer. But as you can see, the question has gone unanswered. Note, too, that four people have thumbed the question up, which signifies a shared interest in a potential answer, but it’s still not making it onto the radar of this particular dealership.

Nearly all verticals could have overlooked leads sitting in their GBPs — from questions about dietary options at a restaurant, to whether a retailer stocks a product, to queries about ADA compliance or available parking. Every ask represents a possible lead, and in a competitive retail landscape, who can afford to ignore such an opportunity?

The easiest way for Google My Business (GMB) listing owners and managers to get notified of new questions is via the Google Maps App, as notifications are not yet part of the main GMB dashboard. This will help you catch questions as they arise. The faster your client responds to incoming queries, the better their chances of winning the foot traffic.

2) Post about your proximity to nearby major attractions

Difficulty level: Easy

Imagine someone has just spent the morning at a museum, a landmark, park, or theatre. After exploring, perhaps they want to go to lunch, go apparel shopping, find a gas station, or a bookstore near them. A well-positioned Google Post, like the one below, can guide them right to your client’s door:

This could become an especially strong draw for foot traffic if Google expands its experiment of showing Posts’ snippets not just in the Business Profile and Local Finder, but within local packs:

Posting is so easy — there’s no reason not to give it a try. Need help getting your client started? Here’s Google’s intro and here’s an interview I did last year with Joel Headley on using Google Posts to boost bookings and conversions.

3) Turn GBPs into storefronts

Difficulty level: Easy for retailers

With a little help from SWIS and Pointy, your retail clients’ GBPs can become the storefront window that beckons in highly-converting foot traffic. Your client’s “See What’s In Store inventory” appears within the Business Profile, letting customers know the business has the exact merchandise they’re looking for:

Pointy is Google’s launch partner for this game-changing GBP feature. I recently interviewed CEO Mark Cummins regarding the ultra-simple Pointy device which makes it a snap for nearly all retailers to instantly bring their inventory online — without the fuss of traditional e-commerce systems and at a truly nominal cost.

I’ll reiterate my prediction that SWIS is the “next big thing” in local, and when last I spoke with Mark, one percent of all US retailers had already adopted his product. Encourage your retail clients to sign up and give them an amazing competitive edge on driving foot traffic!

4) Make your profile pic a selfie hotspot

Difficulty level: Medium (feasible for many storefronts)

When a client has a physical premise (and community ordinances permit it), an exterior mural can turn through traffic into foot traffic — it also helps to convert Instagram selfie-takers into customers. As I mentioned in a recent blog post, a modest investment in this strategy could appeal to the 43–58 percent of survey respondents who are swayed to shop in locations that are visually appealing.

If a large outdoor mural isn’t possible, there’s plenty of inspiration for smaller indoor murals, here

Once the client has made the investment in providing a cultural experience for the community, they can try experimenting with getting the artwork placed as the cover photo on their GBP — anyone looking at a set of competitors in a given area will see this appealing, extra reason to choose their business over others.

Mark my words, local search marketers: We are on the verge of seeing Americans reject the constricted label of “consumer” in a quest for a more holistic view of themselves as whole persons. Local businesses that integrate art, culture, and community life into their business models will be well-placed to answer what, in my view, is a growing desire for authentic human experiences. As a local search marketer, myself, this is a topic I plan to explore further this year.

5) Putting time on your side

Difficulty level: Medium (feasible for willing clients)

Here’s a pet peeve of mine: businesses that serve working people but are only open 9–5. How can your client’s foot traffic achieve optimum levels if their doors are only open when everybody is at work?

So, here’s the task: Do a quick audit of the hours posted on the GBPs of your client’s direct competitors. For example, I found three craft shops in one small city with these hours:

Guess which competitor is getting all of the business after 6 PM every day of the week, when most people are off work and able to shop?

Now, it may well be that some of your smaller clients are already working as many hours as they can, but have they explored whether their hours are actually ideal for their customers’ needs and whether any time slots aren’t being filled in the community by their competitors? What if, instead of operating under the traditional 9–5, your client switched to 11–7, since no other competitor in town is open after 5 PM? It’s the same number of hours and your client would benefit from getting all the foot traffic of the 9–5-ers.

Alternatively, instead of closing on Saturdays, the business closed on Mondays — perhaps this is the slowest of their weekdays? Being open on the weekend could mean that the average worker can now access said business and become a customer.

It will take some openness to change, but if a business agrees to implementation, don’t forget to update the GMB hours and push out the new hours to the major citation platforms via a service like Moz Local

Your turn to add your best GMB moves

I hope you’ll take some of these simple GBP tips to an upcoming client meeting. And if they decide to forge ahead with your tips, be sure to monitor the outcomes! How great if a simple audit of hours turned into a foot traffic win for your client? 

 In the meantime, if you have any favorite techniques, hacks, or easy GMB wins to share with our community, I’d love to read your comments!

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Lilium eVTOL Jets Aim To Be First To Offer Ride-Sharing Autonomous Flights

Lilium is a company whose vision is to enable a world where anyone can fly, anywhere anytime, according to Lilium’s Head of Program Management, Andrew Welling. “We’re doing that via an all-electric vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) jets,” he says. “By 2025, we hope that everyone will be able to order one of our jets at the push of a button.” Eventually, Lilium aims to go completely autonomous.

Andrew Welling, Head of Program Management at Lilium, discusses their goal of becoming the first company to offer autonomous ride-sharing electric jets in a feature produced by Amazon Web Services:

The World’s First eVTOL Jets

Lilium is a company whose vision is to enable a world where anyone can fly, anywhere anytime. We’re doing that via an all-electric vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) jets. It’s the world’s first eVTOL jets. We are hoping to have a service operational in the early 2020s. By 2025, we hope that everyone will be able to order one of our Jets at the push of a button. Our Jets our vertical takeoff and landing jets which means that they can take off from a normal helipad. They take off vertically, rising to a few hundred meters before they transition into a forward flight.

For sure, our batteries are not light, they are obviously one of the heaviest components in our aircraft. But fundamentally, for the future of transport, it’s really important that we move to a world where we’re no longer reliant on fossil fuels. Our services are more like a ride-sharing air taxi service so we want this service to be accessible for anyone and not just the privileged few. The idea is that you’d be able to order a jet via an app on your phone. You would go to initially a defined landing pad to meet the jet, but pretty much it would be an on-demand service. You would be ride-sharing with others who are going to the same destination as you are.

The world’s first eVTOL jet.

The Aim is Autonomous Flight

One of the greatest things about our design is the efficiency that you get through having a wing on the aircraft which can tilt. That means we can take off and land vertically but then when we transition to forward flights we actually get the efficiencies that you get from a winged aircraft. Initially, we will have a pilot on board but the aim is eventually to go to autonomous flight.

We’re building our headquarters in Munich, Germany. That’s where we’re building up both our engineering teams, our production teams, and eventually where our core airline operations will be based. Our target is to have a service operational somewhere in the world by 2025.

Lilium eVTOL Jets Aims To Be First in Offering Ride-Sharing Autonomous Flights

The post Lilium eVTOL Jets Aim To Be First To Offer Ride-Sharing Autonomous Flights appeared first on WebProNews.

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Using insights to find new audiences to test for awareness campaigns

Learn how to test new audience combinations with the Audience Insights tool in Google Ads Audience Manager.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.


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March 1st Google Update: The Mysterious Case of the 19-Result SERPs

Posted by Dr-Pete

Late last week (Feb 28 – Mar 1), we saw a sizable two-day spike in Google rankings flux, as measured by MozCast. Temperatures on Friday reached 108°F. The original temperature on Thursday was 105°F, but that was corrected down to 99°F (more on that later).

Digging in on Friday (March 1st), we saw a number of metrics shift, but most notably was a spike in page-one Google SERPs with more than 10 organic results. Across the 10,000 keywords in MozCast, here’s what we observed at the high end:

Counting “organic” results in 2019 is challenging — some elements, like expanded site-links (in the #1 position), Top Stories, and image results can occupy an organic position. In-depth Articles are particularly challenging (more on that in a moment), and the resulting math usually leaves us with page-one SERPs with counts from 4 to 12. Friday’s numbers were completely beyond anything we’ve seen historically, though, with organic counts up to 19 results.

Dissecting the 19-result SERP

Across 10K keywords, we saw 9 SERPs with 19 results. Below is one of the most straightforward (in terms of counting). There was a Featured Snippet in the #0 position, followed by 19 results that appear organic. This is a direct screenshot from a result for “pumpkin pie recipe” on Google.com/US:

Pardon the long scroll, but I wanted you to get the full effect. There’s no clear marker here to suggest that part of this SERP is a non-organic feature or in some way different. You’ll notice, though, that we transition from more traditional recipe results (with thumbnails) to what appear to be a mix of magazine and newspaper articles. We’ve seen something like this before …

Diving into the depths of in-depth

You may not think much about In-depth Articles these days. That’s in large part because they’re almost completely hidden within regular, organic results. We know they still exist, though, because of deep source-code markers and a mismatch in page-one counts. Here, for example, are the last 6 results from today (March 4th) on a search for “sneakers”:

Nestled in the more traditional, e-commerce results at the end of page one (like Macy’s), you can see articles from FiveThirtyEight, Wired, and The Verge. It’s hard to tell from the layout, but this is a 3-pack of In-depth Articles, which takes the place of a single organic position. So, this SERP appears to have 12 page-one results. Digging into the results on March 1st, we saw a similar pattern, but those 3-packs had expanded to as many as 10 articles.

We retooled the parser to more flexibly detect In-depth Articles (allowing for packs with more than 3 results), and here’s what we saw for prevalence of In-depth Articles over the past two weeks:

Just under 23% of MozCast SERPs on the morning of March 1st had something similar to In-depth Articles, an almost 4X increase from the day before. This number returned to normal (even slightly lower) the next day. It’s possible that our new definition is too broad, and these aren’t really traditional “In-depth” packs, but then we would expect the number to stay elevated. We also saw a large spike in SERP “real-estate” shares for major publications, like the New York Times, which typically dominate In-depth Articles. Something definitely happened around March 1st.

By the new method (removing these results from organic consideration), the temperature for 2/28 dropped from 105°F to 99°F, as some of the unusual results were treated as In-depth Articles and removed from the weather report.

Note that the MozCast temperatures are back-dated, since they represent the change over a 24-hour period. So, the prevalence of In-depth articles on the morning of March 1st is called “3/1″ in the graph, but the day-over-day temperature recorded that morning is labeled “2/28″ in the graph at the beginning of this post.

Sorting out where to go from here

Is this a sign of things to come? It’s really tough to say. On March 1st, I reached out to Twitter to see if people could replicate the 19-result SERPs and many people were able to, both on desktop and mobile:

This did not appear to be a normal test (which we see roll out to something like 1% or less of searchers, typically). It’s possible this was a glitch on Google’s end, but Google doesn’t typically publicize temporary glitches, so it’s hard to tell.

It appears that the 108°F was, in part, a reversal of these strange results. On the other hand, it’s odd that the reversal was larger than the original rankings flux. At the same time, we saw some other signals in play, such as a drop in image results on page one (about 10.5% day-over-day, which did not recover the next day). It’s possible that an algorithm update rolled out, but there was a glitch in that update.

If you’re a traditional publisher or someone who generally benefits from In-depth Articles, I’d recommend keeping your eyes open. This could be a sign of future intent by Google, or it could simply be a mistake. For the rest of us, we’ll have to wait and see. Fortunately, these results appeared mostly at the end of page one, so top rankings were less impacted, but a 19-result page one would certainly shake-up our assumptions about organic positioning and CTR.

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How to Set Up GTM Cookie Tracking (and Better Understand Content Engagement)

Posted by Joel.Mesherghi

The more you understand the behaviour of your users, the better you can market your product or service — which is why Google Tag Manager (GTM) is a marketer’s best friend. With built-in tag templates, such as scroll depth and click tracking, GTM is a powerful tool to measure the engagement and success of your content. 

If you’re only relying on tag templates in GTM, or the occasionally limiting out-of-box Google Analytics, then you could be missing out on insights that go beyond normal engagement metrics. Which means you may be getting an incomplete story from your data.

This post will teach you how to get even more insight by setting up cookies in GTM. You’ll learn how to tag and track multiple page views in a single session, track a specific set number of pages, based on specific on-page content elements, and understand how users are engaging with your content so you can make data-based decisions to better drive conversions.

Example use case

I recently worked with a client that wanted to better understand the behavior of users that landed on their blog content. The main barrier they faced was their URL structure. Their content didn’t live on logical URL structures — they placed their target keyword straight after the root. So, instead of example.com/blog/some-content, their URL structure looked like example.com/some-content.

You can use advanced segments in Google Analytics (GA) to track any number of metrics, but if you don’t have a logically defined URL, then tracking and measuring those metrics becomes a manual and time-consuming practice — especially when there’s a large number of pages to track.

Fortunately, leveraging a custom cookie code, which I provide below, helps you to cut through that time, requires little implementation effort, and can surface powerful insights:

  1. It can indicate that users are engaged with your content and your brand.
  2. The stored data could be used for content scoring — if a page is included in the three pages of an event it may be more valuable than others. You may want to target these pages with more upsell or cross-sell opportunities, if so.
  3. The same scoring logic could apply to authors. If blogs written by certain authors have more page views in a session, then their writing style/topics could be more engaging and you may want to further leverage their content writing skills.
  4. You can build remarketing audience lists to target these seemingly engaged users to align with your business goals — people who are more engaged with your content could be more likely to convert.

So, let’s briefly discuss the anatomy of the custom code that you will need to add to set cookies before we walk through a step by step implementation guide.

Custom cookie code

Cookies, as we all know, are a small text file that is stored in your browser — it helps servers remember who you are and its code is comprised of three elements:

  • a name-value pair containing data
  • an expiry date after which it is no longer valid
  • the domain and path of the server it should be sent to.

You can create a custom code to add to cookies to help you track and store numerous page views in a session across a set of pages.

The code below forms the foundation in setting up your cookies. It defines specific rules, such as the events required to trigger the cookie and the expiration of the cookie. I’ll provide the code, then break it up into two parts to explain each segment.

The code

<script>
function createCookie(name,value,hours) {
    if (hours) {
        var date = new Date();
        date.setTime(date.getTime()+(hours*60*60*1000));
        var expires = "; expires="+date.toGMTString();
    }
    else var expires = "";
    document.cookie = name+"="+value+expires+"; path=/";
}
if (document.querySelectorAll("CSS SELECTOR GOES HERE"").length > 0) {
var y = {{NumberOfBlogPagesVisited}}
if (y == null) {
    createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',1,1);
}
  else if (y == 1) {
    createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',2,1);
  } 
  else if (y == 2) {
    var newCount = Number(y) + 1;
    createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',newCount,12);
  }
 if (newCount == 3) {
 dataLayer.push({
 'event': '3 Blog Pages'
 });
 }
}
</script>

Part 1

<script>
function createCookie(name,value,hours) {
    if (hours) {
        var date = new Date();
        date.setTime(date.getTime()+(hours*60*60*1000));
        var expires = "; expires="+date.toGMTString();
    }
    else var expires = "";
    document.cookie = name+"="+value+expires+"; path=/";
}

Explanation:

This function, as the name implies, will create a cookie if you specify a name, a value, and the time a cookie should be valid for. I’ve specified “hours,” but if you want to specify “days,” you’ll need to iterate variables of the code. Take a peek at this great resource on setting up cookies.

    Part 2

    if (document.querySelectorAll("CSS SELECTOR GOES HERE").length > 0) {
    var y = {{NumberOfBlogPagesVisited}}
    if (y == null) {
    createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',1,1);
    }
    else if (y == 1) {
    createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',2,1);
    }
    else if (y == 2) {
    var newCount = Number(y) + 1;
    createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',newCount,12);
    }
    if (newCount == 3) {
    dataLayer.push({
    'event': '3 Blog Pages'
    });
    }
    </script>

    Explanation:

    The second part of this script will count the number of page views:

    • The “CSS SELECTOR GOES HERE”, which I’ve left blank for now, will be where you add your CSS selector. This will instruct the cookie to fire if the CSS selector matches an element on a page. You can use DevTools to hover over an on-page element, like an author name, and copy the CSS selector.
    • “y” represents the cookie and “NumberOfBlogPagesVisited” is the name I’ve given to the variable. You’ll want to iterate the variable name as you see fit, but the variable name you set up in GTM should be consistent with the variable name in the code (we’ll go through this during the step-by-step guide).
    • “createCookie” is the actual name of your cookie. I’ve called my cookie “BlogPagesVisited.” You can call your cookie whatever you want, but again, it’s imperative that the name you give your cookie in the code is consistent with the cookie name field when you go on to create your variable in GTM. Without consistency, the tag won’t fire correctly.
    • You can also change the hours at which the cookie expires. If a user accumulates three page views in a single session, the code specifies a 12 hour expiration. The reasoning behind this is that if someone comes back after a day or two and views another blog, we won’t consider that to be part of the same “session,” giving us a clearer insight of the user behaviour of people that trigger three page views in a session.
    • This is rather arbitrary, so you can iterate the cookie expiration length to suit your business goals and customers.

    Note: if you want the event to fire after more than three page views (for example, four-page views) then the code would look like the following:

    var y = {{NumberOfBlogPagesVisited}}
    if (y == null) {
    createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',1,1);
    }
    else if (y == 1) {
    createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',2,1);
    }
    }
    else if (y == 2) {
    createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',3,1);
    }
    else if (y == 3) {
    var newCount = Number(y) + 1;
    createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',newCount,12);
    }
      
    if (newCount == 4) {
    dataLayer.push({
    'event': '4 Blog Pages'
    });

    Now that we have a basic understanding of the script, we can use GTM to implement everything.

    First, you’ll need the set up the following “Tags,” “Triggers”, and ”Variables”:

    Tags

    Custom HTML tag: contains the cookie script

    Event tag: fires the event and sends the data to GA after a third pageview is a session.

    Triggers

    Page View trigger: defines the conditions that will fire your Custom HTML Tag.

    Custom Event trigger: defines the conditions that will fire your event.

    Variable

    First Party Cookie variable: This will define a value that a trigger needs to evaluate whether or not your Custom HTML tag should fire.

    Now, let’s walk through the steps of setting this up in GTM.

    Step 1: Create a custom HTML tag

    First, we’ll need to create a Custom HTML Tag that will contain the cookie script. This time, I’ve added the CSS selector, below:

     #content > div.post.type-post.status-publish.format-standard.hentry > div.entry-meta > span > span.author.vcard > a

    This matches authors on Distilled’s blog pages, so you’ll want to add your own unique selector.

    Navigate to Tags > New > Custom HTML Tag > and paste the script into the custom HTML tag box.

    You’ll want to ensure your tag name is descriptive and intuitive. Google recommends the following tag naming convention: Tag Type – Detail – Location. This will allow you to easily identify and sort related tags from the overview tag interface. You can also create separate folders for different projects to keep things more organized.

    Following Google’s example, I’ve called my tag Custom HTML – 3 Page Views Cookie – Blog.

    Once you’ve created your tag, remember to click save.

    Step 2: Create a trigger

    Creating a trigger will define the conditions that will fire your custom HTML tag. If you want to learn more about triggers, you can read up on Simo Ahava’s trigger guide.

    Navigate to Triggers > New > PageView.

    Once you’ve clicked the trigger configuration box, you’ll want to select “Page View” as a trigger type. I’ve also named my trigger Page View – Cookie Trigger – Blog, as I’m going to set up the tag to fire when users land on blog content.

    Next, you’ll want to define the properties of your trigger.

    Since we’re relying on the CSS selector to trigger the cookie across the site, select “All Page Views”.

    Once you’ve defined your trigger, click save.

    Step 3: Create your variable

    Just like how a Custom HTML tag relies on a trigger to fire, a trigger relies on a variable. A variable defines a value that a trigger needs to evaluate whether or not a tag should fire. If you want to learn more about variables, I recommend reading up on Simo Ahava’s variable guide.

    Head over to Variables > User-Defined Variables > Select 1st Party Cookie. You’ll also notice that I’ve named this variable “NumberOfBlogPagesVisited” — you’ll want this variable name to match what is in your cookie code.

    Having selected “1st Party Cookie,” you’ll now need to input your cookie name. Remember: the cookie name needs to replicate the name you’ve given your cookie in the code. I named my cookie BlogPagesVisited, so I’ve replicated that in the Cookie Name field, as seen below.

    Step 4: Create your event tag

    When a user triggers a third-page view, we’ll want to have it recorded and sent to GA. To do this, we need to set up an “Event” tag.

    First, navigate to Tags > New > Select Google Analytics – Universal Analytics:

    Once you’ve made your tag type “Google Analytics – Universal Analytics”, make sure track type is an “Event” and you name your “Category” and “Action” accordingly. You can also fill in a label and value if you wish. I’ve also selected “True” in the “Non-interaction Hit” field, as I still want to track bounce rate metrics.

    Finally, you’ll want to select a GA Setting variable that will pass on stored cookie information to a GA property.

    Step 5: Create your trigger

    This trigger will reference your event.

    Navigate to Trigger > New > Custom Event

    Once you’ve selected Custom Event, you’ll want to ensure the “Event name” field matches the name you have given your event in the code. In my case, I called the event “3 Blog Pages”.

    Step 6: Audit your cookie in preview mode

    After you’ve selected the preview mode, you should conduct an audit of your cookie to ensure everything is firing properly. To do this, navigate to the site you where you’ve set up cookies.

    Within the debugging interface, head on over to Page View > Variables.

    Next, look to a URL that contains the CSS selector. In the case of the client, we used the CSS selector that referenced an on-page author. All their content pages used the same CSS selector for authors. Using the GTM preview tool you’ll see that “NumberOfBlogPagesVisited” variable has been executed.

    And the actual “BlogPagesVisited” cookie has fired at a value of “1” in Chrome DevTools. To see this, click Inspect > Application > Cookies.

    If we skip the second-page view and execute our third-page view on another blog page, you’ll see that both our GA event and our Custom HTML tag fired, as it’s our third-page view.

    You’ll also see the third-page view triggered our cookie value of “3” in Chrome DevTools.

    Step 7: Set up your advanced segment

    Now that you’ve set up your cookie, you’ll want to pull the stored cookie data into GA, which will allow you to manipulate the data as you see fit.

    In GA, go to Behaviour > Events > Overview > Add Segment > New Segment > Sequences > Event Action > and then add the event name you specified in your event tag. I specified “3 Blog Page Views.”

    And there you have it! 

    Conclusion

    Now that you know how to set up a cookie in GTM, you can get heaps of additional insight into the engagement of your content.

    You also know how also to play around with the code snippet and iterate the number of page views required to fire the cookie event as well as the expiration of the cookies at each stage to suit your needs.

    I’d be interested to hear what other use cases you can think of for this cookie, or what other types of cookies you set up in GTM and what data you get from them.

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    Our Own Sarah Bird Joins the 2019 Class of Henry Crown Fellows!

    Posted by TheMozTeam

    Mozzers believe in doing good, whether we’re helping new SEOs learn the ropes, encouraging young girls to consider a career in STEM, or just maintaining a dog-friendly (and thus smile-friendly) office. It’s why so much of our content and tools are available for free. It’s why Moz has a generous employee donation-match program that matched over $ 500,000 between 2013 and 2017, supporting organizations making the world a more just and charitable place. It’s why we partner with programs like Year Up, Ignite, and Techbridge to inspire the next generation of technology leaders.

    And of course, TAGFEE is the beating heart of everything we do. It’s part of our DNA. That’s why we’re incredibly proud (and humbled!) to announce that our very own CEO and Disney-karaoke-extraordinaire, Sarah Bird, has been accepted into The Aspen Institute’s 23rd class of Henry Crown Fellows, a program whose values resonate deeply with our own.

    The Henry Crown Fellowship is an influential program that enables leaders to embrace their inner do-gooder. Every year, around twenty leaders from around the world are accepted into the fellowship. Having proven their success in the private sector, each new Fellow uses this opportunity to play a similar role in their communities, their country, or the world.

    Pretty exciting, right? The best part of all, though: it’s not just about reflection. It’s about action. Fellows in the program have launched over 2,500 leadership ventures, using the opportunity to tackle everything from improving healthcare access, to battling domestic violence, to enhancing sustainable living, and beyond. It’s important, highly impactful stuff.

    “Executives are often criticized for building successful businesses without giving back to the communities that helped them along the way,” says Sarah, “but we must lead as much in our communities as we do in our businesses.”

    Tech companies and executives often face deserved scrutiny for the second- and third-order impacts of their successes. It’s a hard truth that the benefits and costs of technology advances aren’t shared equally between all people, and the cost to our environment is often not fully accounted for. The consequence is an understandable backlash against technologists.

    “In order to change this,” adds Sarah, “we need to earnestly and with rigor dive into the sociological and ecological consequences of our work. Those of us with great power and privilege need to recognize and embrace our role in creating a more just and healthy future. I feel called to make a difference, and I’m glad there is a program out there to provide a framework and accountability for action.”

    Here at Moz, we’ve been lucky enough to benefit from Sarah’s influence for years — we know she’s good people, inside and out. And now, we can’t wait to see her make waves in the world at large with the support of the Henry Crown Fellowship.

    We’d love for you to join us in congratulating her in the comments below, and bonus points if you share the cause that’s closest to your heart!

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    Conversational Marketing Closes the Gap Between B2C and B2B, Says Drift Marketing VP

    Conversational marketing is a whole new way of thinking about marketing and sales, says Dave Gerhardt, VP of Marketing at Drift. “We go to our jobs in B2B and none of the tools that we use match how we actually buy as real people,” he says. “That’s the most exciting thing to me about conversational marketing. It’s really closing the gap between B2C and B2B. We just call it B2P, marketing to people.”

    Dave Gerhardt, VP of Marketing at Drift, was recently interviewed on the B2B Growth podcast by John Rougeux who is VP of Marketing at Skyfii. Gerhardt discusses conversational marketing as a new B2B product category and how it is changing marketing from reaching out to you later to a conversation that is happening now:

    Conversational Marketing is About Connecting You Now

    Conversational marketing is a whole new way of thinking about marketing and sales. The traditional way of doing marketing and sales is all about later. Come to my website and fill out this form and somebody is going to reach out to you later, when it’s convenient for them. The big shift that is happening in marketing and business over the last five to ten years is customers have all the power today. You can’t make people wait. Information is free now.

    I can find anything I want to know about a company without ever having to go to your website. It’s crazy to think that you are going to force people to go to your website, fill out a form, wait three days to hear back from your sales team, and then get a demo. Conversational is all about connecting you now with the people who are ready to buy now while they are live on your website.

    B2P – Marketing to People

    It’s not about buyers. It’s not about sellers. It’s not about sales. It’s not about marketing. It’s about people. That’s how people all communicate online today. I pressed one button in my car and I got a list. I ordered something from Amazon while I was here this morning to send back to my house and it’s going to be there tomorrow when I get home. There are countless examples of that. That is how we all behave online in our real lives today.

    But then something happens weird happens. We go to our jobs in B2B and none of the tools that we use match how we actually buy as real people. That’s the most exciting thing to me about conversational marketing. It’s really closing the gap between B2C and B2B. We just call it B2P, marketing to people.

    What Ties Our Products Together is Conversation

    We have an email product and we have a landing page product. Black and white versions of those people would say everybody has email, everybody has landing pages. The thing that ties those together is conversation. That forces us to think about what is conversational email? What is conversational landing pages? What is conversational whatever? That one word forces our product team to think about how can we change this? If our fundamental stance as a company is that the internet should be one conversation, then how does that weave into everything that we build?

    Ultimately what we care about is that email becomes a conversation. Meaning, the way that marketers have had to use email the last decade is a one-way channel. Email is meant to be a two-way channel. Marketers have been using it as, “John come to my webinar.” What happens if you actually respond to that email? Most of the time you can’t because it’s donotreply@ or it just goes to some inbox where nobody is answering it. That is a terrible experience. Our belief is that if you reply, “Hey actually I can’t make it. Can you reregister my colleague?” That should get handled. We are thinking of that from an evolution standpoint.

    The same thing with landing pages. Most landing pages today are static. You go to the landing page, put a bunch of info in and you are gone. What if that was a real-time conversation on the page? That one topic has to weave itself into everything we do from a product perspective.

    >> Listen to the complete interview with Drift Marketing VP Dave Gerhardt on the B2B Growth podcast.

    The post Conversational Marketing Closes the Gap Between B2C and B2B, Says Drift Marketing VP appeared first on WebProNews.

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    Copyblogger Book Club: Master Content Strategy

    You might have noticed that we tend to be pretty big on content marketing strategy around here. “Throw a ton…

    The post Copyblogger Book Club: Master Content Strategy appeared first on Copyblogger.


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    Tactics and Strategies that Help You Look (and Think) Like a Pro

    This week, we’ve got a bunch of tips, tactics, and strategies to help you get more out of the work…

    The post Tactics and Strategies that Help You Look (and Think) Like a Pro appeared first on Copyblogger.


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    The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 1: SEO Strategy – Whiteboard Friday

    Posted by randfish

    Can you learn SEO in an hour? Surprisingly, the answer is yes, at least when it comes to the fundamentals! 

    With this edition of Whiteboard Friday, we’re kicking off something special: a six-part series of roughly ten-minute-long videos designed to deliver core SEO concepts efficiently and effectively. It’s our hope that this will serve as a helpful resource for a wide range of people:

    • Beginner SEOs looking to get acquainted with the field concisely & comprehensively
    • Clients, bosses, and stakeholders who would benefit from an enhanced understanding of your work
    • New team members who need quick and easy onboarding
    • Colleagues with SEO-adjacent roles, such as web developers and software engineers

    Today we’ll be covering Part 1: SEO Strategy with the man who wrote the original guide on SEO, our friend Rand. Settle in, and stay tuned next Friday for our second video covering keyword research!

    Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!

    Video Transcription

    Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to a special edition of the Whiteboard Friday series. I’m Rand Fishkin, the founder and former CEO of Moz, and I’m here with you today because I’m going to deliver a one-hour guide to SEO, front and back, so that you can learn in just an hour the fundamentals of the practice and be smarter at choosing a great SEO firm to work with, hiring SEO people. 

    A handy SEO resource for your clients, team, and colleagues

    If you are already in SEO, you might pick up some tips and tactics that you didn’t otherwise know or hadn’t previously considered. I want to ask those of you who are sort of intermediate level and advanced level SEOs — and I know there are many of you who have historically watched me on Whiteboard Friday and I really appreciate that — to give this video a chance even though it is at the beginner level, because my hope is that it will be valuable to you to send to your clients, your potential customers, people who join your team and work with you, developers or software engineers or web devs who you are working with and whose help you need but you want them to understand the fundamentals of SEO.

    If those are the people that you’re talking to, excellent. This series is for you. We’re going to begin with SEO strategy. That is our first part. Then we’ll get into things like keyword research and technical SEO and link building and all of that good stuff as well. 

    The essentials: What is SEO, and what does it do?

    So first off, SEO is search engine optimization. It is essentially the practice of influencing or being able to control some of the results that Google shows when someone types in or speaks a query to their system.

    I say Google. You can influence other search engines, like Bing and DuckDuckGo and Yahoo and Seznam if you’re in the Czech Republic or Baidu. But we are primarily focused on Google because Google has more than a 90% market share in the United States and, in fact, in North America and South America, in most of Europe, Asia, and the Middle East with a few exceptions.

    Start with business goals

    So SEO is a tactic. It’s a way to control things. It is not a business goal. No one forms a new company or sits down with their division and says, “Okay, we need to rank for all of these keywords.” Instead what you should be saying, what hopefully is happening in your teams is, “We have these business goals.”

    Example: “Grow our online soccer jersey sales to a web-savvy, custom heavy audience.”

    Let’s say we’re an online e-commerce shop and we sell customized soccer jerseys, well, football for those of you outside of the United States. So we want to grow our online soccer jersey sales. Great, that is a true business goal. We’re trying to build a bigger audience. We want to sell more of these jerseys. In order to do that, we have marketing goals that we want to achieve, things like we want to build brand awareness.

    Next, marketing goals

    Build brand awareness

    We want more people to know who we are, to have heard of our particular brand, because people who have heard of us are going to be more likely to buy from us. The first time you hear about someone, very unlikely to buy. The seventh time you’ve heard about someone, much more likely to buy from them. So that is a good marketing goal, and SEO can help with that. We’ll talk about that in a sec.

    Grow top-of-funnel traffic

    You might want to grow top-of-funnel traffic. We want more people coming to the site overall so that we can do a better job of figuring out who is the right audience for us and converting some of those people, retargeting some of those people, capturing emails from some of those people, all those good things. 

    Attract ready-to-buy fans

    We want to attract ready-to-buy fans, people who are chomping at the bit to buy our soccer jerseys, customize them and get them shipped.

    SEO, as a strategy, is essentially a set of tactics, things that you will do in the SEO world to rank for different keywords in the search engines or control and influence what already ranks in there so that you can achieve your marketing goals so that you can achieve your business goals.

    Don’t get this backwards. Don’t start from a place of SEO. Especially if you are an SEO specialist or a practitioner or you’re joining a consulting firm, you should always have an excellent idea of what these are and why the SEO tactics that you are undertaking fit into them. If you don’t, you should be asking those questions before you begin any SEO work.

    Otherwise you’re going to accomplish things and do things that don’t have the impact or don’t tie directly to the impact that the business owners care about, and that’s going to mean probably you won’t get picked up for another contract or you won’t accomplish the goals that mean you’re valuable to the team or you do things that people don’t necessarily need and want in the business and therefore you are seen as a less valuable part of it.

    Finally, move into SEO strategy

    But if you’re accomplishing things that can clearly tie to these, the opposite. People will really value what you do. 

    Rank for low-demand, high-conversion keywords

    So SEO can do things like rank for low demand, things that don’t have a lot of searches per month but they are high conversion likely keywords, keywords like “I am looking for a customized Seattle Sounders soccer jersey that’s in the away colors.” Well, there’s not a lot of search demand for that exact phrase. But if you’re searching for it, you’re very likely to convert. 

    Earn traffic from high-demand, low-competition, less commerce-focused keywords

    You could try and earn traffic from high-demand, low competition keywords that are less focused directly on e-commerce. So it could be things like “Seattle Sounders news” or “Seattle Sounders stats” or a comparison of “Portland Timbers versus Seattle Sounders.” These are two soccer or football clubs in the Pacific Northwest. 

    Build content that attracts links and influencer engagement

    Or you might be trying to do things like building content that attracts links and influencer engagement so that in the future you can rank for more competitive keywords. We’ll talk about that in a sec. SEO can do some amazing things, but there are also things that it cannot do.

    What SEO can do:

    If you put things in here, if you as an SEO pitch to your marketing team or your business owners that SEO can do things that it can’t, you’re going to be in trouble. So when we compose an SEO strategy, a set of tactics that tries to accomplish marketing goals that tie to business goals, SEO can do things like:

    • Attract searchers that are seeking your content.
    • Control how your brand is seen in search results when someone searches for your particular name. 
    • Nudge searchers toward queries by influencing what gets suggested in the auto suggest or by suggesting related searches or people also ask boxes. 

    Anything that shows up in the search results, nearly anything can be influenced by what we as SEOs can do.

    What SEO cannot do:

    Grow or create search demand on its own

    But SEO cannot grow or create search demand by itself. So if someone says, “Hey, I want us to get more traffic for this specific keyword,” if you’re already ranking number one and you have some videos showing in the results and you’re also in the image results and you’ve got maybe a secondary page that links off to you from the results, you might say, “Hey, there’s just not more demand,” and SEO by itself can’t create that additional demand.

    Build brand (by itself)

    SEO also can’t build brand, at least not by itself. It can certainly be a helpful part of that structure. But if someone says, “Hey, I want us to be better known among this audience,”you can say, “Well, SEO can help a little, but it can’t build a brand on its own, and it certainly can’t build brand perception on its own.” People are going to go and visit your website. They’re going to go and experience, have an interaction with what you’ve created on the web. That is going to be far more of a brand builder, a brand indicator than just what appears in the search results. So SEO can’t do that alone. 

    Directly convert customers

    It also can’t directly convert customers. A lot of the time what we find is that someone will do a great job of ranking, but when you actually reach the website, when visitors reach the website, they are unsatisfied by the search, which by the way is one of the reasons why this one-hour guide is going to include a section on searcher satisfaction.

    When Google sees over time that searchers are unsatisfied by a result, they will push that result down in the rankings and find someone who does a great job of satisfying searchers, and they will rank them instead. So the website has to do this. It is part of SEO. It’s certainly part of the equation, but SEO can’t influence it or control it on its own.

    WORK OVERNIGHT!

    Finally, last but not least, SEO cannot work overnight. It just won’t happen. SEO is a long-term investment. It is very different from paid search ads, PPC, also called SEM sometimes, buying from Google ads or from Bing ads and appearing in the sponsored results. That is a tactic where you can pour money in and optimize and get results out in 24 hours. SEO is more like a 24-month long process. 

    The SEO Growth Path

    I’ve tried to show that here. The fundamental concept is when you have a new website, you need to earn these things — links and engagement and historical performance in the rankings.

    As you earn those things, other people are linking to you from around the web, people are talking about you, people are engaging with your pages and your brand, people start searching for your brand specifically, people are clicking you more in the search results and then having good experiences on your website, as all those great things happen, you will grow your historical engagement and links and ranking factors, all these things that we sort of put into the bucket of the authority and influence of a website.

    3–6 months: Begin to rank for things in the long tail of search demand

    As that grows, you will be able to first, over time, this might be three to six months down here, you might be able to rank for a few keywords in the long tail of search demand. 

    6–9 months: Begin to rank for more and more competitive keywords

    After six to nine months, if you’re very good at this, you may be able to rank for more and more competitive keywords.

    12–18 months: Compete for tougher keywords

    As you truly grow a brand that is well-known and well thought of on the internet and by search engines, 12 to 18 months in, maybe longer, you may be able to compete for tougher and tougher keywords. When I started the Moz website, back in the early days of Google, it took me years, literally two or three years before I was ranking for anything in Google, anything in the search engines, and that is because I had to first earn that brand equity, that trust, that relationship with the search engines, those links and that engagement.

    Today this is more true than ever because Google is so good at estimating these things. All right. I look forward to hearing all about the amazing strategies and structures that you’ve got probably in the comments down below. I’m sure it will be a great thread. We’ll move on to the second part of our one-hour guide next time — keyword research. Take care.

    Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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